Definition of overground in English:

overground

adjective & adverb

  • 1On or above the ground:

    [as adverb] ‘it has suggested that a new line be built overground’
    [as adjective] ‘overground stations’
    • ‘I tracked down the local overground station, only to find that this part of London merits merely two trains an hour, and so sat freezing on the platform until my deliverer arrived.’
    • ‘The Tube had been sealed off due to an earlier security alert, but the concourse for overground trains was extremely busy.’
    • ‘We eventually found a bench on a windy overground train platform and huddled round lousy tea and coffees trying to keep warm.’
    • ‘It's a bit like riding the London tube when it goes overground out in the suburbs.’
    • ‘Dart is the overground Dublin urban rail system.’
    • ‘The overground train line to Sutton did not achieve the same success as the underground, as the line was expensive because of construction and compensation costs.’
    • ‘That is a fine evocation of an overground platform in suburban London.’
    • ‘This morning, I just wanted the tube to keep on travelling overground.’
    • ‘The overground railway should be upgraded to tube level.’
    • ‘Although Liverpool Street had now reopened, and there was a fair chance I'd have been able to get home by overground train, a fallen tree still stood between myself and my car.’
    • ‘It wasn't just the underground system that was actually put out, but it was the overground rail system taking people out into the suburbs as well.’
    • ‘At Vauxhall I get an overground train to Putney, and from there a bus up the hill.’
    • ‘With the nights drawing in, overground railway stations in south-east London (the land the underground map forgot) have become a popular location for the streetwise mugger.’
    • ‘Concerns have been raised about the overground car park and its design, the store's appearance, increased noise, road and pedestrian access issues and the overall scale of the new store.’
    • ‘Car parking would be provided in 171 overground and underground spaces.’
    • ‘While the platforms are bricked up, meaning little can be seen as trains rush through, those allowed entry via the still-existing overground station facade enter one of London's most curious historic sites.’
    • ‘The revised bylaw would also regulate overground networks like masts erected by telecommunications operators.’
    • ‘On this side, under the window, there is construction work - apparently a depot for the overground metro line nearby.’
    • ‘Here, both with Tube trains and overground commuter trains, it's increasingly a story of delays, horrendous overcrowding and reduced off-peak services.’
    • ‘But new figures show that just 170 of Britain's 2,500 overground and underground stations are classed as ‘secure’ and Swindon is not one of them.’
  • 2[as adjective] Not subversive or illicit:

    ‘they devised plans for using overground political processes’
    • ‘The second was an overground pop smash, with a groovy state-of-the-art video that got everyone talking.’
    • ‘Sawhney is also working on a commission from the BBC for a piece to be played at the Proms - and you don't get much more overground than that.’

Pronunciation:

overground

/ˈəʊvəɡraʊnd/