Definition of over in English:

over

preposition

  • 1Extending directly upwards from.

    ‘I saw flames over Berlin’
    ‘cook the sauce over a moderate heat’
    • ‘Continue to cook over a low heat until vegetables are submerged in their own liquid.’
    • ‘Lift the fish out onto warm plates and place the baking dish over a moderate flame.’
    • ‘Add olives to the pan and cook over a moderate heat until they begin to wrinkle.’
    • ‘Let it cook over a relatively low heat till the bottom has formed a golden crust.’
    • ‘Cook over a fairly high heat for two to three minutes, then add the tomatoes and juices.’
    • ‘Cook over a high heat until just wilted, cool a bit, then squeeze out most of the moisture.’
    • ‘Put the yolk in a metal bowl, held close to a flame but not over it, and mix until it turns white.’
    • ‘In a large heavy pan, melt half the butter with the oil over a moderate heat.’
    • ‘Soaring directly over our heads, she disappears back into the main current and is gone.’
    • ‘This occurred when a new building was built directly over the top of the remains of its predecessor.’
    • ‘This brings the centre of gravity directly over the right foot, which supports her weight.’
    • ‘Keep mixing the roux over the flame until the mixture comes off the sides of the pot.’
    • ‘If you position your eyes directly over the ball then your eyes will always be aligned with the hole.’
    • ‘Melt the fat in a pan, beat the egg and milk together, add to the fat in the pan, season well and cook over a gentle heat.’
    • ‘Heat the oil in a large saucepan, add the leeks and bay leaves, and fry over a high heat until the leeks have some colour.’
    • ‘For a more reliable source, you need to be directly over the clay seam where the fossils are buried.’
    • ‘They were meant to be cooked the rest of the way by the diners over a flame that was brought in for that purpose.’
    • ‘Cook over a gentle heat for five minutes, and then add the chopped anchovies and the olives.’
    • ‘The meat is seared over the hottest flames, then moved to a cooler part of the fire to cook gently through.’
    • ‘We are welcomed in with open arms and hearts, and they prepare beautiful food, cooked over an open fire.’
    above, on top of, higher than, higher up than, atop
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    1. 1.1 Above so as to cover or protect.
      ‘an oxygen tent over the bed’
      ‘ladle this sauce over fresh pasta’
      • ‘It was only when the council put a thick layer of clay over it that this flora was lost.’
      • ‘He innocently assumed that a steel cover placed over a drainpipe was safe to walk on.’
      • ‘Place a layer of tomato slices over the pesto then top with crumbled cheese.’
      • ‘They had set up a shelter over their fire.’
      • ‘He was on his bed with the covers over him and she thought he was asleep.’
      • ‘Many of you suggested laying small lengths of holly over the damaged area of garden.’
      • ‘In case of cold weather, it would be a good idea to apply a layer of mulch over the bulbs.’
      • ‘The cloths were laid on the ground directly over the plants and fixed with spikes.’
      • ‘The blast from the bomb had blown out all the windows but my mother had pulled the covers over us.’
      • ‘When I stop the car for a while and switch off the engine, the silence falls like a cloak over the countryside.’
      • ‘Scatter the fresh coriander over the curry and serve with plain boiled rice.’
      • ‘Mix well and spray thoroughly over both sides of the foliage and onto the offending pest.’
      • ‘Mix together the salt and sugar, and rub evenly over both sides of the salmon.’
      • ‘They have looked into loaning some covers to put over the pitch tomorrow night in case of overnight frost.’
      • ‘Two engineers were then able to pull up the two covers over the damaged cable.’
      • ‘I turned up to the theatre in the costume and a couple of people threw coffee over me.’
      • ‘She then ran into the bedroom where her husband finally poured water over the flames.’
      • ‘The kettle had boiled so Don poured the water over the coffee powder in the mug.’
      • ‘A kind of invisible bell jar had been dropped over it, protecting it from change.’
      • ‘Sprinkle cracker crumbs evenly over the bottom and sides, then pour in the ricotta mixture.’
    2. 1.2 Extending above (an area) from a vantage point.
      ‘views over Hyde Park’
      • ‘A sunroom looks out over the vegetable garden.’
      • ‘This is a gracious and welcoming house with spectacular views over open countryside.’
      • ‘There's a large outside balcony area which faces South over the city centre rooftops.’
      • ‘This area has great views over the rear garden through large windows and a set of patio doors.’
      • ‘Still wearing her pajamas she went onto the balcony and looked over the front lawns.’
      • ‘Looking over the side you would expect to see a treasure chest full of gold.’
      • ‘Even on the stormy day that we visited, the vista over some of the uninhabited islands was magical.’
      • ‘She looks out of the window over the parking lot and slides the tray of untouched fries away.’
      • ‘He walked to the single window looking out over the front lawn and road and opened it.’
      across, on to, around, throughout, all through, throughout the extent of, everywhere in, in all parts of
      View synonyms
  • 2At a higher level or layer than.

    ‘his flat was over the shop’
    • ‘His powerful shot was just over the bar.’
    • ‘The office was over a newsagent's shop in the centre of Manchester.’
    • ‘He thumped a chance over the bar.’
    • ‘Byatt almost doubled his tally seven minutes later after a fine run ended with his shot whistling over the bar.’
    • ‘The ball eventually came into the possession of Mike Cooper and he stuck it over the bar.’
    • ‘This was done from the rear of the ranks in most circumstances, and over the heads of the shield wall of the thrower.’
    • ‘Sherry had another excellent chance after 27 minutes but he sent his header over the bar.’
    • ‘A pair of tame shots by Ben Thornley that floated up and over the bar were as much as they could muster in the first half.’
    • ‘The drysuit can be worn over a layer of clothing and it keeps its wearer completely dry and warm.’
    • ‘He then had an opportunity to put the visitors level but he flicked the shot just over the cross bar.’
    • ‘They were used and enjoyed by townsfolk who lived over their businesses and were unable to escape to a garden.’
    • ‘At the other end, a speculative lob from Ian Duncan dipped just over the bar.’
    • ‘His sweet right shot looked destined for the net but just sailed over the bar.’
    • ‘The volley sailed over the front rank of soldiers and fell among the battle leaders beyond.’
    • ‘He whipped in a viciously dipping shot that spun just a foot over the bar.’
    • ‘Then they must either transfer it quickly either over the bar or to a player in a better position.’
    • ‘After a long delay, he stepped up to sky the spot-kick over the bar.’
    • ‘Just to make sure, I now usually use a second layer of bandage over the first.’
    above, on top of, higher than, higher up than, atop
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    1. 2.1 Higher in rank than.
      ‘over him is the financial director’
      • ‘John had two levels of management over him.’
      • ‘The first-level manager, of course, has another manager over him.’
      • ‘He had six senior officers over him.’
      superior to, above, higher up than, more powerful than, in charge of, responsible for, commanding
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    2. 2.2 Expressing authority or control.
      ‘editorial control over what is included’
      • ‘Those receiving benefits would be given control over their own training budgets.’
      • ‘What they will not put up with, however, is a lack of control over other people.’
      • ‘Also, I always feel as though I have a certain measure of control over the situation.’
      • ‘Britain retains sovereign rights over two areas to be used as military bases.’
      • ‘Instead, the locals enjoy their town and impose some control over the speed of motor vehicles using it.’
      • ‘This structure is one which allows the spectator a degree of power over what is seen.’
      • ‘Second, it centralises that information and gives you control over what is visible to others.’
      • ‘At this time there was little or no control over speed boats by the authorities.’
      • ‘This time they will choose a government that will have real power over the direction of the country.’
      • ‘They seemed less stressed and they acted as if they had real control over what they were doing.’
      • ‘However, a Ministry of Defence official says his department has no control over the plant.’
      • ‘Let's hope it is just a first step in giving back people control over their own lives.’
      • ‘Family doctors in England are being given control over the budgets which buy hospital services.’
      • ‘However, the ship was teeming with children whose parents had absolutely no control over them.’
      • ‘He is no longer the grim dictator with the power of life and death over his subjects.’
      • ‘The charity said that women who had babies at home tended to have greater privacy and more control over the birth.’
      • ‘Help them to regain a sense of control over their life by offering choices and options.’
      • ‘He is concerned about the local education authority losing some control over the school.’
      • ‘The membership of the party have no say over the policy and direction of the party.’
      • ‘They also insist local authorities will still have some control over their own waste policies.’
    3. 2.3 Expressing preference.
      ‘I'd choose the well-known brand over that one’
      • ‘The shares are best left for those who prefer hope over reality with their investments.’
      • ‘How could anyone prefer that over a real democracy that had evolved since the end of World War Two?’
      • ‘It is necessary to look at the grounds on which we are persuaded to prefer one theory over another.’
      • ‘The evidence that the country's people would have preferred an invasion over other options is slight.’
      • ‘In terms of manufacture and for aesthetic reasons, plastics are preferred over metal.’
      • ‘It seems to be working as the family audience are slowly preferring it over other films.’
      • ‘Either way, give me this lot over a bunch of monosyllabic scowlers any day.’
      • ‘It also reveals a preference for debt over equity as a means of providing external funding.’
      • ‘Since then the cartel has been attempting to show how responsible it is and has favoured price over volume.’
      • ‘For those hoping to stay, it should be noted that their manager considers attitude over ability.’
      • ‘Is care and concern always to be preferred over more emotionally detached ways of relating to others?’
      • ‘None of this persuades me that my preference for poetry over politics is a wrong choice.’
      • ‘For long distances, he prefers the bus over airliners or rail because he likes the atmosphere.’
      • ‘In the old days, we used to prefer the wider good over personal convenience.’
      • ‘The choice of a sloping tiled roof over a flat roof had more to do with the local climatic conditions than with style.’
      • ‘Do seed predators, floral herbivores and pollinators prefer one sex over the other?’
    4. 2.4 Expressing majority.
      ‘there was a slight predominance of boys over girls’
      • ‘There was an excess of men over women.’
      • ‘Care was taken to attend showings at which the audience contained a predominance of adults over children’
    5. 2.5 Higher in volume or pitch than.
      ‘he shouted over the noise of the taxis’
      • ‘The television screen was enormous, but I had to turn up the volume to hear it over the roar of Park Lane.’
      • ‘Hearing him shout over a rumbling beat is one of life's singular pleasures.’
      • ‘People crowded round the bar frantically shouting their orders over the noise of the band.’
      • ‘Rogers screamed over the noise of rifle shots ringing out through the cool, night air.’
      • ‘The noise got so loud we had to shout over it.’
      • ‘I loved it so much that I wanted to shout about it over the cacophony of the real world.’
      • ‘Much of the night was spent shouting at increasing volumes over ear-splitting music.’
      • ‘I shouted over the noise.’
      • ‘There was some music playing in the background, which could barely be heard over the noise.’
      • ‘A confused babble of voices rose over the hubbub.’
  • 3Higher or more than (a specified number or quantity)

    ‘over 40 degrees C’
    ‘they've been married for over a year’
    • ‘Most of the material is stuff we'd been playing in front of live audiences for over a year.’
    • ‘As the globe warms and over a billion people live on less than one dollar a day, a global left is needed more than ever.’
    • ‘Flood levels over three meters deep drowned cars and drove people from their homes.’
    • ‘Water in the house reached a level of over three feet and considerable damage was caused.’
    • ‘Pensions have fallen in value by over a third since the change was introduced.’
    • ‘We raise such a hue and cry when a tree is cut down, but with every heavy shower over a dozen trees fall.’
    • ‘Mind you, I think it was probably over thirty degrees when this was filmed earlier today.’
    • ‘In fact he supervised the production of over 30 volumes in his role as general editor.’
    • ‘He was trapped in the car, which burst into flames, for over an hour.’
    • ‘We had been together for over a year, but I left him because everything he did seemed so boring and dull.’
    • ‘In some areas of the county over half the number of fires reported are started deliberately.’
    • ‘On that basis the unemployment levels of those over forty are not reasonable.’
    • ‘The age of some of the rocks in the area has been a subject of debate by geologists for over 150 years.’
    • ‘We spent a lot of time together, well over two months, and so we really got to know each other.’
    • ‘The shores of these islands are often sandy but temperatures over 30 degrees are rare.’
    • ‘She was born in Oxford and has lived in Ireland for over twenty five years.’
    • ‘Applicants must be over 25 and have had a clean driving licence for more than five years.’
    • ‘I have friends who have lived in Thailand for over thirty years and can't speak a work of Thai.’
    • ‘The house, the entrance lodge and garden of just over an acre comprise lot one.’
    • ‘The house, which is very elegant, had not been lived in for over four years and was slowly crumbling away.’
    more than, above, in excess of, exceeding, upwards of, beyond, greater than
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  • 4Expressing passage or trajectory across.

    ‘she trudged over the lawn’
    • ‘It was possible that a big cat could roam over a huge area.’
    • ‘Together we bounded over a meadow and parked the car on the edge of a copse.’
    • ‘A small climb up over a muddy slope gains a corner with some fine formations.’
    • ‘Some headed directly east: over the mountains and into the tribal areas of Pakistan.’
    • ‘Police, including six armed officers, swarmed over the area and the gangsters fled.’
    • ‘The pace picks up as the river flows swift and shallow over a rocky bed.’
    • ‘The Act, creates a new legal right to roam over areas, mapped as open land and registered common land.’
    • ‘We headed off down Pierce's Passage and over a muddy boulder slope until we reached some cascades.’
    • ‘An injured climber walked for a mile over rocky terrain after falling off a cliff and breaking his arm and foot.’
    • ‘Flying over vast areas of vegetation, the scale of the disaster caused by the floods begins to unfold.’
    • ‘Ignore side roads as you go up the hill and over a cross roads with traffic lights.’
    • ‘Ranks closed and the birds swept over the estuary, rising and falling, packed together.’
    • ‘The more obvious route goes directly up the ridge over steep, rocky ground, though there is a path to follow.’
    • ‘Clamber over this, and follow the passage through a short canal to a rope climb up a rift.’
    • ‘Then it was time to go home and everyone started to drive over the newly fallen snow in their cars with the big fat tyres on them.’
    • ‘Once changed we set off over the fell with the rain thankfully absent for the time being.’
    across, on to, around, throughout, all through, throughout the extent of, everywhere in, in all parts of
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 Beyond and falling or hanging from.
      ‘he toppled over the side of the boat’
      • ‘He left the pub alone at closing time and must have fallen over the wall on his walk home.’
      • ‘I scowled into the night, took a swig of my beer and dumped the rest over the side of the deck.’
      • ‘They roll him over on his side and his arm flaps limply over the side of the gurney.’
      • ‘Working on a film in St Lucia, he almost crashes a bus over the side of a ravine.’
      • ‘Can I report a loss because I have dropped my wallet over the side of the boat on the way back from France?’
      • ‘Her long, brown legs were draped over the side of the boat.’
      • ‘Bait and decoys keep the sharks close to the boats, and a cage can then be dropped over the side for a diver to get a much closer look.’
      • ‘Six-foot waves crash over the sides of the landing craft and several are swamped.’
      • ‘Wounded in the leg, he fell back over a ledge and was fortunate to be snagged by a tree.’
      • ‘Many of the owners are given time frames of how long it will be before their homes topple over the cliff.’
      • ‘On a perfect day, with someone on shark-watch, we had leapt over the side to go for a swim.’
      • ‘When we moved off and dropped over the hull side, however, we found the visibility was as good as 1m!’
      • ‘It drops over the side of the canoe as I try to store it away in a waterproof container.’
      • ‘They claimed they were breaching a crazy law that was forcing them to dump fish caught in their nets over the side.’
      • ‘They wrapped the first bomb in a sack and carefully rolled it over the side, where it exploded.’
      • ‘He is splashing fish heads over the side of the boat, looking sick and out of place.’
      • ‘He fell 25 feet over a ledge and suffered head injuries after crashing into rocks.’
      • ‘There are five people on board and you have to decide who to chuck over the side to save the rest.’
      • ‘Cars had been crushed like balls of paper, and chucked over the side of the bridges.’
      • ‘As it is, any adult proposing to get comfortable back there is going to have to dangle their feet over the sides.’
    2. 4.2 At the other side of; beyond.
      ‘over the hill is a small village’
      • ‘There is a village over the river from Liverpool called Port Sunlight.’
      • ‘He sits next to his Personal Assistant, with his sales and marketing director over the partition.’
      • ‘She asks if he could give her a lift to a town over the border.’
      • ‘Just over the other side of the mountain, on the other slope at 770 foot, is the weather station.’
      • ‘Over the river, King's College has an absolutely stunning Fellows' Garden.’
  • 5Expressing duration.

    ‘you've given us a lot of heartache over the years’
    ‘she told me over coffee’
    • ‘However, a number of the York side have improved over the last year and a close result is forecast.’
    • ‘I've been in a lot of interesting places over the past two years and worked with some really great people.’
    • ‘Police are also linking the duo to two other attacks in the Nottinghamshire area over the past few days.’
    • ‘With the fine weather there has been a huge increase in visitors to the area over the past month or so.’
    • ‘In just over a month the area was evacuated and the village literally vanished off the map.’
    • ‘The stones of the path had been polished by the passage of feet over hundreds, if not thousands, of years.’
    • ‘We had a longer day care service, holiday cover and respite care over the weekend.’
    • ‘They will be able to pay £12 a month over three years to cover their end of the deal.’
    • ‘To enjoy these bulbs year after year, they must be dug up in fall and stored indoors over the winter.’
    • ‘Security forces were thought to have largely cleaned up the area over the past two years.’
    • ‘The cost of generating electricity by wind power has fallen dramatically over the past few years.’
    • ‘Alan eventually broke the news to her over a cup of coffee when they got home.’
    • ‘There has been an increase in firearm crime in the area over the last five years.’
    • ‘My memory of the entrance passages had faded over the years, so we took a few wrong turnings.’
    • ‘Collectors from the scheme will be calling to homes in the area over the coming two weeks.’
    • ‘The couple said they will be organising lots of fundraising events over the coming year.’
    • ‘We talk over coffee in his small Knightsbridge office, where he employs just one assistant.’
    • ‘Search teams have been combing the area over the weekend but have so far been unable to trace the murder weapon.’
    • ‘Attacks on staff have increased in almost all areas of the NHS over the last 10 years.’
    • ‘The direction of the markets over the coming months will largely be down to American interest rates.’
  • 6Expressing the medium by which something is done; by means of.

    ‘a voice came over the loudspeaker’
    • ‘The lights began to dim out and then a voice was heard over the microphone.’
    • ‘Within a few moments a reply was clearly voiced over the small speaker in the headrest of the chair.’
    • ‘Customers will get used to making free voice calls over the internet.’
    • ‘His or her face is illuminated with a soft red light, and white noise is played over headphones.’
    • ‘This month's Athens Olympics will become the first to be broadcast live over the Net.’
    • ‘The company also put out Madonna's concert at Slane live over the internet last year.’
    • ‘The Dominoes On Line web site enables you to play dominoes live over the Internet.’
    • ‘This is usually much more expensive than buying direct over the telephone or internet.’
    • ‘The almost robotic voice of the security office fizzed over the voice comm.’
    • ‘She printed a map with instructions, but he insisted on giving directions over the phone.’
    • ‘Increasingly customers buy insurance direct over the phone, or on the internet.’
    • ‘The lights over the rink dimmed and flashed colors, and a slow song came on over the loudspeakers.’
    • ‘The crowd listened in silence as the service was broadcast over loudspeakers.’
    • ‘These could be used to attract more sales, perhaps even direct sales over the internet.’
    • ‘Although not available in Orkney, the station broadcasts live over the internet.’
    • ‘My husband heard the shouts over the phone and called the police when he realised I was being robbed.’
  • 7On the subject of.

    ‘a long and heated debate over unemployment’
    • ‘Protests were staged in Kew on Monday over fresh attempts by a phone company to put up a mast in North Road.’
    • ‘There were concerns over your level of alcohol consumption and its effect on your conduct.’
    • ‘We argue all the time, whether it's over my driving or directions or anything really.’
    • ‘The next battles were over the first direct elections to the European Parliament.’
    • ‘That has raised fresh concerns over the nation's ability to pull itself out of recession.’
    • ‘A fresh row has erupted over the thorny issue of a northern bypass for Witham.’
    • ‘New figures show that the highest number of complaints are made over domestic noise.’
    • ‘There has been a strong feeling among rank and file workers to walk out over this issue.’
    • ‘MPs said it was a straight fight between the two sides over who would win approval for a new medical school.’
    • ‘The protagonists are ex-college buddies who fell out over a girl called Betty Anne.’
    • ‘The debate over the use of cannabis in medicine is controversial and emotive.’
    • ‘We need joint union rallies over pensions and a serious campaign among rank and file members.’
    • ‘Right now, the world is faced with a debate over how to deal with the water crisis.’
    • ‘This incident raises fresh concerns over safety, and public access to the water's edge.’
    • ‘After bringing the railways to the city, he fell from grace over dodgy financial dealings.’
    • ‘Many couples fall out over the house when they separate since it is usually the biggest asset.’
    • ‘There is a great deal of debate over the safety of buying on the internet.’
    • ‘He has been getting a lot more aggressive recently over such trivial things as the housework and his dinner.’
    • ‘Publicans are falling out over new licensing laws allowing pubs to open much later.’
    • ‘The traffickers then had a gunbattle with a rival drug gang over drug selling areas.’
    on the subject of, about, concerning, apropos of, with reference to, speaking of, with regard to, with respect to, regarding, as regards, relating to, respecting, in connection with, as for, re
    View synonyms

adverb

  • 1Expressing passage or trajectory across an area.

    ‘he leant over and tapped me on the hand’
    • ‘He lifted me over and then one of them grabbed my hand.’
    • ‘I put it back to its original position and wandered over to the other side of the room.’
    • ‘He immediately rushed over to the area, which was in a barren part of the forest.’
    • ‘The gunman went directly over to him, and fired at least three shots.’
    • ‘It was a delight to watch the bird in flight as it flew over in the direction of Rookfield village.’
    • ‘He crawled over to her side at once and picked up one of her hands, clenching it tightly in his grip.’
    • ‘As she went to climb over, she fell and clipped her feet on the wall and her whole body flipped and she landed on her head.’
    • ‘Then he bounded over to the opposite side of the busy pedestrian area to another target.’
    • ‘He leaned over and sloppily kissed her, and she could smell liquor on his breath.’
    • ‘I wander over to the opposite side of the arena.’
    • ‘Loud snores drifted over from one side of the room as someone had become so relaxed they'd fallen asleep.’
    • ‘He reached over and gently stroked the cat.’
    • ‘She dunked her head under water and when she came up she swam over to my side of the pool.’
    1. 1.1 In or to the place indicated.
      ‘I'm over here’
      • ‘As you reach the first curve, you put your arm over to the side and you feel the acceleration.’
      • ‘Drizzle the lemon juice over and then sprinkle each plate with a tablespoon of olive oil.’
      • ‘He is sitting somewhere over on the far side of the room.’
      • ‘As the ugly scenes on the pitch spilled over into the crowd, police were called to the Corbet Field ground.’
      • ‘Isabel often has friends over for coffee in this room, as there is a playroom for children nearby.’
      • ‘I used to read the Craven Herald when I lived over here and always pick it up when back in the area.’
      • ‘World ranking points are lower over here, of course, but the standard of play isn't as good.’
      • ‘The scenery is brilliant, so why not take a trip west to see how we live over here.’
      • ‘It is no use the Minister over there shouting across the floor of the House to me.’
      • ‘Nick will do a fantastic job in America because he has played a lot over there.’
      • ‘The machine is right over on the other side of the house, and it has never woken us up before.’
      • ‘The other side of town is a virtual no go area for us living over here.’
      • ‘I also have a friend who has lived over here for a while and he really sold the city to me as a great place to live.’
      • ‘Although the film is due out soon, she confessed she would prefer to have friends over for a visit than go to a premiere.’
      • ‘He's over in the kitchen area, wearing nothing but his hat and a baggy pair of Y-fronts.’
      • ‘We've had a lot of fun over here in the last six years, but it's time to go home.’
      • ‘I was drinking in the area so I popped over to have a quick look.’
      • ‘She says she wishes to have me over for coffee.’
      • ‘The live scene over there is very active, but the geography doesn't make touring easy.’
      • ‘This is incredibly popular in America and would generate lots of interest over here.’
  • 2Beyond and falling or hanging from a point.

    ‘she knocked the jug over’
    • ‘In explanation the guard said that it had fallen over as the train was crossing the curve at Neville Hill.’
    • ‘The two rear carriages tipped over on their sides before the train came to a halt.’
    • ‘It had toppled itself so far over to one side that it had pulled its roots out of the soil.’
    • ‘It is designed to be difficult to knock over because of gyroscopes that work to keep it upright.’
    • ‘The oil drum where the male monkey had been sitting began to wobble from side to side and finally toppled right over.’
    • ‘It was thought that a candle had fallen over and set alight the paperwork in an office in the garage.’
    • ‘One of my parsley pots had fallen over, so I picked it up and put it down properly.’
    • ‘Some the stems of the flowers seem too weak to support the flower, so they bend over and sometimes break off.’
  • 3Used to express action and result.

    ‘the car flipped over’
    ‘hand the money over’
    • ‘Initially doubtful, Bird was eventually won over and took control of the project.’
    • ‘Indeed, Henry became so afraid of the cult that he ordered that the tomb be covered over.’
    • ‘You have to hand it over to a director and allow them to do what they want to it.’
    • ‘They also dug over an area of ground which will be used to grow herbs and tomatoes for the school kitchen.’
    • ‘I rolled over and then it was as if someone had thrown a lot of grit into my eyes.’
    • ‘The cards are turned back over and then the next turn begins with two more cards being chosen.’
    • ‘It should also be the case that significant areas should be given over to free parking.’
    • ‘The boot gets tossed, it teeters on its side then rolls over with the shoe laces facing up.’
    • ‘It is about keeping the invader out, rather than allowing him in and winning him over to your side.’
    • ‘She wrapped it up in a piece of plastic and returned to the restaurant where she handed it over to the duty manager.’
    • ‘He handed a small stack of bills over and soon Nathan found himself heading back to his own car.’
    • ‘Why hand your cash over to a tout when you could work your passage, get a more secure sleeping area and get in for free?’
    • ‘Some of us are all too keen on putting our views over and not listening to what's being said.’
    • ‘It will be preserved and covered over by the floor slab of the new building.’
    • ‘I looked him over and quickly spotted a few cuts that had not been there the night before.’
    • ‘He looked himself over; he was covered in a greenish substance that he did not recognize.’
    • ‘Just watch the amiable face cloud over as the subject of passing years is raised.’
    • ‘The real eyesore was the derelict building we took over, which was covered in vandalism.’
    • ‘His shot from outside the area was just tipped over.’
    • ‘She had recently taken over as manager, and decided instead to keep it open.’
    1. 3.1 Finished.
      ‘the match is over’
      ‘message understood, over and out’
      • ‘The Indian series is over and almost immediately in this crowded age it is time to focus on Australia.’
      • ‘I'm going to wait till it's over and then somehow talk to her.’
      • ‘Well, the UK General Election is over and not much has changed in the cold light of day.’
      • ‘Now, our national game is in disarray, our World Cup is over and even the Tartan Army have had enough.’
      • ‘Fifty years of heartache is over for a former Rochdale man who has finally found the sister he has never met.’
      • ‘This is comforting somehow; the phoney war is pretty much over and now the real fight begins.’
      • ‘Our time together over, I shake hands, thank her for her candour and walk out the door.’
      • ‘Why do so many women think the battle is over?’
      • ‘But the game was far from over and the home side were not going to go down without a fight.’
      • ‘When mass was over and more prayers had been said, each body would be brought to its grave by clergy and mourners.’
      • ‘He waited until the game at Celtic Park was over and then phoned his son.’
      • ‘The crisis was over, but both sides were fully aware of how close they had come to nuclear annihilation.’
      • ‘The sterile and confrontational years should be declared over on all sides.’
      • ‘Yet the action still wasn't over with the away side determined to rescue some lost pride.’
      • ‘Sunday evening we managed to come out of our homes, not knowing if it was over or not.’
      • ‘The question should be whether the halcyon days of direct foreign investment are over.’
      • ‘Once this was over we were then subjected to more searches and much x-raying of luggage.’
      • ‘My long weekend is nearly over and then it is back to the drudgery of the workplace.’
      • ‘Do you know exactly what you want to do with yourself once your undergrad degree is over?’
      • ‘Any chance of further reform across other areas is now over.’
      at an end, finished, concluded, terminated, no more, ended, extinct, gone, dead, a thing of the past, ancient history
      View synonyms
  • 4Used to express repetition of a process.

    ‘the jukebox plays every song twice over’
    • ‘Of course we wouldn't live the same life over, that wouldn't be possible, would it?’
    • ‘I loved the book so much that I have read it twice over.’
    • ‘It was the longest sentence he said that day, but he repeated it several times over.’
    • ‘As a healthcare professional that is what I observe over and again.’
    • ‘If you could pick just one day of your life to live over again, which day would you choose?’

noun

  • A sequence of six balls bowled by a bowler from one end of the pitch, after which another bowler takes over from the other end.

    • ‘At that stage, scoring at eight runs an over appeared to be a fantastic display.’
    • ‘His first eight overs yielded just 10 runs and included four wickets.’
    • ‘As on Saturday, play went on late because Worcestershire bowled their overs so slowly.’
    • ‘In the Indian first innings, he bowled just six overs at a cost of 32 runs.’
    • ‘He would bowl six overs, take wickets and get taken off because he was so unfit.’

Phrases

  • (all) over again

    • From the beginning for a second or subsequent time.

      ‘the sums will have to be done over again’
      ‘I tore it up and started all over again’
      • ‘This season, he has to prove himself all over again.’
      • ‘This was so good I wanted to start reading it all over again but I had to lend it to a friend to read first.’
      • ‘Becoming world champions undoubtedly boosted our confidence, but now we have to prove we're capable of doing it all over again.’
      • ‘It wouldn't be necessary to re-try the whole case all over again to determine the question of damages.’
      • ‘He said the intense media coverage was victimising her all over again.’
      • ‘He would have to endure the process all over again.’
  • be over

    • No longer be affected by.

      ‘we were over the worst’
      • ‘Wendy has been advised to stay on HRT for only five years, when she should be over her symptoms.’
      • ‘Please just strike me down here and now because I am just destined to never be over any of this.’
      • ‘We seem to be over the stomach problems now.’
      • ‘If I can keep it up right through the weekend I reckon I'll be over the worst of it.’
      • ‘He is now over his cold and is doing better everyday.’
  • get something over with

    • Do or undergo something unpleasant or difficult, so as to be rid of it.

      • ‘I am just looking forward to getting it over with.’
      • ‘I think he got it over with quickly because he hated auditions, just like me.’
      • ‘I just confessed and pled guilty and got it over with.’
      • ‘They made everyone stand up at staff meetings in order to get them over with quickly.’
      • ‘It was a case of just getting it over with and looking forward to next season.’
      • ‘While this often seems like a good way of speeding up a painful process and getting it over with, it is certainly no aid to communication or good public speaking.’
      • ‘He wanted to get the whole thing over with.’
      • ‘Damage was minimal and despite my irritation and extreme annoyance, my only goal was to get the formalities over with, get back into my car and go home.’
      • ‘I suppose it was a good idea to get it over with quickly.’
      • ‘We shopped at a leisurely pace in the supermarket, browsing and thinking rather than madly grabbing the same products as last week in order to get it over with.’
  • over against

    • 1Adjacent to.

      ‘over against the wall’
      • ‘A teacher who had joined the insurgents keeled over against him and whispered, ‘There is no god but God ‘, before dying.’’
      • ‘A voice called out, telling them to settle down, and they seated themselves on a mismatch of assorted chairs, a couple perching themselves on barrels and bales over against the wall.’
      • ‘The bed that was in the center of the room was now over against the left wall.’
      • ‘Instead it stands over against this process like a mirror held up to it.’
      • ‘He spied three familiar figures hunched over against the wall.’
    • 2In contrast with.

      ‘over against heaven is hell’
      • ‘In fact, the New Testament is clearer and fuller on this than the Old Testament, as can be seen by looking at what Jesus, the incarnate Son of God, taught about Hell, over against the prophets, for example.’
      • ‘Evangelical Protestantism defines itself over against mainline Protestantism.’
      • ‘From that perspective, a main problem in the book is its tendency to posit psychosocial explanations over against ecclesiastical, theological, and philosophical turns.’
      • ‘The Commentary on the Song of Songs points much more in this direction, in that the synagogue and the church are set over against one another as the ‘old Eve’ and the ‘new Eve.’’
      • ‘But to find this a compelling argument, one must already be convinced of the inalienable sanctity of choice, over against every other social good.’
      • ‘He sets over against this his own clear spiritual position.’
      • ‘The Report could have chosen to speak in the strident tone of the Apocalypse, defining the church over against the whore of Babylon.’
      • ‘She is attempting to define herself over against the established powers.’
      • ‘They do not need to define Christianity as a religion of grace over against a religion of law, because they discover in the actual words of Paul that no such contrast exists in his letters.’
      • ‘She put her sixth-century royal French name and wealth to work for a safe and peaceful women's religious community over against the violence and brutality around her.’
  • over and above

    • In addition to.

      ‘exceptional service over and above what normally might be expected’
      • ‘A farmer may also apply for an additional bond over and above his or her basic quota.’
      • ‘The deal included a signing on bonus and an extra £85-a-day over and above their wages.’
      • ‘Each target audience requires information that is unique to itself over and above the general information.’
      • ‘Any profit they make over and above the interest charges of the loan, increases the value of the fund for all participating investors.’
      • ‘Drill pay, while adequate, is over and above what they are paid on their civilian jobs.’
      • ‘There are some locations where traffic calming, over and above that provided by the existing laws of the highway, may be desirable.’
      • ‘It is not envisaged that the proposal will lead to any increase in noise from the site over and above any that may be generated at present.’
      • ‘In fact, he had made a new addition to his daily itinerary over and above what he had been doing before.’
      • ‘He behaved as an employee but had an interest as shareholder over and above that of employee and stood to gain if the company prospered.’
      • ‘Any money allows us to improve patient comfort or bring in new equipment that is over and above what we would normally buy for ourselves.’
      in addition to, on top of, over and beyond, plus, as well as, besides, not to mention, along with, let alone
      View synonyms
  • over and done with

    • Completely finished.

      • ‘We go up and do our training, get it over and done with, and try not to be distracted by what people are saying about the match.’
      • ‘If I have to testify I ask that it be done as soon as possible, because I just want to get this over and done with and get on with my life.’
      • ‘It is a strange feeling to work on this project for a whole year, only for it to be over and done with in what feels like the blink of an eye.’
      • ‘It was as if everyone was waiting for the official speeches to be over and done with.’
      • ‘I'm not too concerned about the exam, just looking forwards to getting it over and done with.’
      • ‘But all we want to do is get it over and done with and hope that our daughter can go on to lead a normal life.’
      • ‘Thank goodness that's all over and done with for another year.’
      • ‘My only hope at this point is that they get this wretched debacle over and done with as soon as possible, and preferably before it gets really messy.’
      • ‘The longer this fiasco goes on, then the more shareholders are going to be hurt, so let's get it over and done with as quickly as possible.’
      • ‘I'd like to get this over and done with as quickly as possible.’
      completed, concluded, consummated, finalized, terminated, over and done with, over, in the past, at an end
      View synonyms
  • over and over

    • Again and again.

      ‘doing the same thing over and over again’
      • ‘She read the novel over and over.’
      • ‘I liked The Jungle Book soundtrack which I used to play over and over on my tape player.’
      • ‘There is this song repeating itself over and over in my head but I can't get further than a few words.’
      • ‘Repeat this over and over at gradually lengthening intervals until your baby goes to sleep.’
      • ‘It one of those movies you can watch over and over.’
      repeatedly, again and again, over and over again, time and again, time and time again, many times over, on many occasions, on several occasions, often, frequently, recurrently, constantly, continually, persistently, regularly, habitually, ad nauseam
      View synonyms
  • over to you

    • informal Used to say that it is now your turn or responsibility.

      ‘it's over to you, the people of Scotland, to decide who should win’
      • ‘Anyway, it's over to you now to listen to five of our favorites and pick the one that you fancy the most!’
      • ‘Over to you consumer: vote with your feet.’
      • ‘The nominees have been suggested by our judging panel but it's over to you to decide who should win.’
      • ‘Over to you to discuss whatever you want in the world of football transfers’
      • ‘We think this sums up things more eloquently than we ever could, so over to you John.’

Origin

Old English ofer, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch over and German über, from an Indo-European word (originally a comparative of the element represented by -ove in above) which is also the base of Latin super and Greek huper.

Pronunciation

over

/ˈəʊvə/