Definition of outmanoeuvre in English:

outmanoeuvre

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Evade (an opponent) by moving faster or with greater agility:

    ‘the YF-22 can outmanoeuvre any fighter flying today’
    • ‘Speed gives a great deal of versatility to a unit, allowing the player to respond quickly, choose when and where they want to fight, and generally outmaneuver an opponent.’
    • ‘It is largely irrelevant to humanitarian relief and peacekeeping operations because rapid movement usually is not important in the sense of outmaneuvering an enemy.’
    • ‘She still had enough speed and agility to outmaneuver the more powerful attacks directed at her.’
    • ‘The aircraft was specifically designed to outmanoeuvre enemy aircraft and, while slower than its main opponent, the Albatros, it could easily turn inside that aircraft at a much quicker turn rate.’
    • ‘Frightened but quick-witted, the shapely skin diver outmanoeuvres the silent predator and stays low among the coral and such, where the shark can't get her.’
    • ‘He can't get by on skill and athletic ability and must outmuscle opponents instead of outmaneuvering them.’
    • ‘In their opening and closing games England's lumbering back four were hopelessly outmanoeuvred by bursts of fast, mobile, unpredictable attacks, like tankers anchored as speedboats darted around them.’
    • ‘But much to the Americans' surprise, the Eurofighter shook them off, outmanoeuvred them and moved into shooting positions on their tails.’
    • ‘It gave Allied pilots a major tactical advantage as they were able to tolerate greater G-forces to outmanoeuvre their opponents.’
    • ‘The Navy specified they wanted a fighter that could greatly outclimb and outmaneuver the Hellcat while being capable of operation from the smallest of aircraft carriers.’
    • ‘They were outmanoeuvred for 70 minutes by a decent Dunfermline side, but a late burst of urgency brought them a consolation goal and made the last few minutes tense for the winners.’
    • ‘A boxing match is like a chess game, with fighters trying to outwit and outmaneuver their opponent to deliver the knockout blow.’
    • ‘The flight of two Harriers outmaneuvered the Mirages and quickly downed two of the fighters with Sidewinder missiles.’
    outflank, circumvent, bypass, shake off, throw off, get around
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Use skill and cunning to gain an advantage over:
      ‘he hoped he would be able to outmanoeuvre his critics’
      • ‘He was eventually able to outmaneuver his own teacher, Janie.’
      • ‘It remains to be seen if a new president will be able to outmaneuver them.’
      • ‘We were also outmaneuvered by his sophisticated public relations machine.’
      • ‘An alliance of limited duration with a player who is deficient in strategy can leave you in a much better position as you outmaneuver him in dealing with the players on the other side of the board.’
      • ‘It did that by outmaneuvering and underselling its competitors for decades, thereby earning its station as the top global retailer.’
      • ‘And for that matter, is the reason he's now so interested in learning the truth behind the newspaper fire simply that he doesn't like her having outmaneuvered him?’
      • ‘And after pinning all its economic hopes on exporting to the US market, it finds itself outmaneuvered in low-wage manufacturing.’
      • ‘But he was outmaneuvered by politicians, teacher union activists, and school officials, who thought he was out to profiteer from poor children.’
      • ‘In 2002, green groups got outspent and outmaneuvered.’
      • ‘He struggles to keep the upper hand, but she outmaneuvers him more often than not.’
      • ‘After a decent interval of licking our wounds and pondering what might have been and where we went wrong, we need to spit out our despair and return - united - to battling those who have for the moment outmaneuvered us.’
      • ‘He is a solid strategist, who uses his entire roster and rarely gets outmaneuvered.’
      • ‘He answers his own question: ‘I got outmaneuvered at a big company.’’
      • ‘Deportation or the failure to get a visa is seen as a temporary setback during which strategies to outmaneuver consular officers, who are perceived as racists, are elaborated.’
      • ‘But here, too, the company has had to figure out ways to outmaneuver players with vast R&D resources.’
      • ‘He outmaneuvered people in the past who could somehow become too dangerous for him.’
      • ‘Rebuffed in the world's biggest market, it turned to Spain, investing in port facilities and outmaneuvering European rivals for control of the country's two largest cement firms.’
      • ‘As a fox is able to recognize traps, a prince must be able to outmaneuver his foes.’
      • ‘Companies that rely solely on such a customer-focused approach may find themselves outmaneuvered by competitors with more imagination.’
      • ‘They battle amongst themselves, and with him, until the government becomes nothing more than a game board upon which each faction presses his advantage of the moment, only to be outmaneuvered or overtaken by a rival.’
      outwit, outsmart, out-think, outplay, be cleverer than, steal a march on, trick, make a fool of, get the better of
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Pronunciation:

outmanoeuvre

/aʊtməˈnuːvə/