Definition of ordination in English:

ordination

noun

  • 1The action of ordaining someone in holy orders.

    ‘the ordination of women’
    • ‘Infidelity to one's vows is sinful; infidelity to the grace and character of sacred ordination to the priesthood is sinful; sexual abuse in whatever form is sinful.’
    • ‘Among Anglicans, responsibility for the good order of the Church is placed in the hands of bishops by custom, rites of ordination, and canon law.’
    • ‘The Protestant Church of North India is now training women for ordination, despite initial resistance.’
    • ‘The nature of each is spelled out in baptism and ordination.’
    • ‘All churches have structures of ministry that they identify, in various ways, as arising from baptism and conferred through ordination and other forms of blessing and appointment.’
    • ‘Encouraged by his mother and her great friend, John Donne, he accepted ordination as a deacon.’
    • ‘As for Harrigan, no fair reader could claim that the article did not delve into contentious issues such as liturgical reform, women's ordination, clerical sexual abuse, and racism.’
    • ‘When I mentioned this to my wife Regina she said, ‘It should teach you that ordination isn't for you; it's for the church.’’
    • ‘Whether at ordination a man expected to be a priest for thirty-seven years or forty-eight years, ordination was ordination.’
    • ‘The church retains the right to deny ordination to people on many grounds: age, marital history, financial history, criminal history, psychiatric history, and so on.’
    • ‘I refer specifically to the Eastern tradition of requiring men to be married before they are ordained and prohibiting marriage after ordination.’
    • ‘Redwoods Presbytery voted 90-37 to approve Morrison's ordination and installation as a field director for More Light Presbyterians.’
    • ‘One is ordained and two are considering ordination.’
    • ‘Behr-Sigel recognizes that Orthodox women are not permitted to preach within the liturgy itself, and that the possibility of ordination to the presbyterate seems a dim prospect.’
    • ‘One of the things I most look forward to, if the Lord wills, is attending my son Jeremy's ordination to the ministry.’
    • ‘The more we think about ordination in the context of baptism, the greater the leveling effect.’
    • ‘Ministry does not begin at ordination, but at baptism.’
    • ‘Attending to political perceptions and consequences, while not unimportant, is nowhere to be found in the rite of episcopal ordination.’
    • ‘With other controversial issues such as slavery and women's ordination, laity and clergy could find Bible verses to help Spirit-led changes.’
    • ‘Lutherans had agreed to the Episcopal practice of ordination by a bishop.’
    induction, introduction, admission, admittance, installation, incorporation, ordination, investiture, investment, enlistment, enrolment, recruitment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[count noun]A ceremony in which someone is ordained.
      ‘they travel to Exeter for an ordination’
      • ‘In order for a woman to be recognized as deacon an ordination had to take place.’
      • ‘There are, however, no studies of Marrant's Narrative as an ordination sermon, and the function that it served as such.’
      • ‘The new ordinations also circumvent centuries-old protocol, said Jan Nunley, a priest who is deputy director of the Episcopal News Service.’
      • ‘What the church does, then, when it conducts the wedding rite or the ordination rite is clear enough.’
      • ‘There are now 400-500 ordinations annually in Italy, compared to 100-150 in France; in the 1950s France had a smaller population and ordained more priests.’
      • ‘The bishop, as spiritual elder, officiates at baptisms, weddings, communions, funerals, ordinations, and membership meetings.’
      • ‘But, at the end of that practice period, the fall of 1972, I came back up here for the ordination ceremony and was here for about a year acting as Richard's attendant.’
      • ‘After their ordinations, parishioners and others will help complete their formation.’
      • ‘Campbell participated in many ordinations of men who would become pastors in these new churches.’
      • ‘Lutherans have historically allowed pastors to preside at ordinations when authorized by the candidate's synod bishop.’
      • ‘In an older time, the hymn was frequently sung at priestly ordinations.’
      • ‘Participants in the ordination ceremony included Morrison's father, Steve, who is an elder at Pasadena Presbyterian Church.’
      • ‘Bishop Christy Jones sent his apologies as he was performing an ordination in Strokestown at the same time.’
      • ‘After all, a coronation is merely an ordination on the grand scale.’
      • ‘The ordination ceremony honors the presence of a special voice.’
      • ‘Two weeks later, Olsen participated in the Episcopalians' ordinations at St. James Cathedral.’
      • ‘So the headquarters decided to have a full ordination ceremony here in Australia.’
      • ‘I am reasonably sure the statement would also rule invalid the ordinations of several canonized saints.’
      • ‘There will be a solemn ordination service, with the taking of vows, the laying on of hands, and the giving of the right hand of fellowship.’
      • ‘If ordinations are classed as invalid because of such considerations, then the sacramental character of the ecclesial community is called into question.’
  • 2Ecology
    [count noun] A statistical technique in which data from a large number of sites or populations are represented as points in a multidimensional space.

    • ‘Such trends are better displayed by ordination techniques that map the relationship between communities in two- or three-dimensional space.’
    • ‘The requirements of assembling the ordination are the principal limitation to wide application.’
    • ‘Inter-sample relationships in ordination space were largely determined by the abundance of common taxa.’
    • ‘Both the habitat data and the ordination analysis indicate that many of these exotic species are found in forested areas.’
    • ‘A non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination identified two gradients of species replacement distinguished by differences in forest canopy species and groundcover.’
  • 3literary The action of decreeing or ordaining.

Origin

Late Middle English (in the general sense ‘arrangement in order’): from Latin ordinatio(n-), from Latin ordinare put in order (see ordain).

Pronunciation:

ordination

/ɔːdɪˈneɪʃ(ə)n/