Definition of ordinand in English:

ordinand

noun

  • A person who is training to be ordained as a priest or minister.

    • ‘Some evangelical ordinands are questioning whether they can in good conscience go forward to ordination in the current crisis.’
    • ‘Its resident priests and ordinands are surely not exemplars of unalloyed virtue; indeed, they all have reason for committing the murders.’
    • ‘Her priests and ordinands are fallible human beings, but they are serious about their faith and committed to their calling.’
    • ‘And most of the ordinands are facing the altar, either standing, or crouching down with their forehead touching the ground in a full bow.’
    • ‘As one of my characters says, these may be priests and ordinands, but they are still men.’
    • ‘Bishop Clarke explained that throughout the Church of Ireland there is a shortage of ordained clergy and of ordinands.’
    • ‘Jeff Rawle, star of Drop The Dead Donkey and I Saw You, plays the pernickety Father Peregrine, and Jesse Spencer is the handsome young ordinand Raphael.’
    • ‘The ‘reality’ about the Church is that it last year ordained 569 new deacons - 50 per cent more than four years ago - and that today there are more than 1,600 ordinands in training, it says.’
    • ‘He pointed out that women would soon outnumber men as ordinands.’
    • ‘As it happens, in 1978 only 15 percent of ordinands were female; by 1984 that had doubled to over 30 percent.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Latin ordinandus, gerundive of ordinare ‘put in order’ (see ordain).

Pronunciation

ordinand

/ˈɔːdɪnand/