Main definitions of oratory in English

: oratory1oratory2

oratory1

noun

  • 1A small chapel, especially for private worship.

    • ‘Beside this the oratory has a high beamed ceiling, an exposed stone wall and views over the garden to the front and side.’
    • ‘At the same time, the Filippine Order was spreading its wings, and oratories were set up in many cities in Roman Catholic countries.’
    • ‘The compactness of the oratory contributed to the reverence and respect which was to be found everywhere.’
    • ‘The oratories tended to have permanent officers under the direction of the rector of the local baptismal church.’
    • ‘He and the students who flocked to him in droves constructed an oratory named the Paraclete, where he continued to write, teach, and research.’
    • ‘Upstairs there is a small oratory with stained glass window, four bedrooms, a linen room, washroom and shower room.’
    • ‘Concern has been expressed at the unsuitability of the current oratory premises and the people are concerned that the oratory will be permanently closed.’
    • ‘Her mortal remains repose in a private oratory of the Institute's Motherhouse in Rome.’
    • ‘My room key came with an invitation to use the oratory in Kohne Hall, open 24 hours a day.’
    • ‘A successful lecture was held in the Dominican oratory recently on the subject of how the church began.’
    • ‘Religious services will be conducted by visiting clergy, and the home has a tranquil oratory.’
    • ‘There are the remains of a number of oratories and some stone monuments that may be pre-Christian.’
    • ‘The conditions in the oratory at the time were light years ahead or rural houses.’
    • ‘Nunnington Hall is reputed to be haunted by a presence that prevents any occupant of the Panelled Bedroom, which has an adjoining oratory, from sleeping until it has passed over the bed and out through the wall.’
    • ‘It was painted for the private oratory in the apartments of Anne of Austria in the Palais Royale, Paris, into which she had moved following the death of her husband, Louis XIII, in 1643.’
    • ‘Archbishop Neary recalled that the men and boys of the surrounding parishes had carried stones, timber and cement to the summit during the construction of the oratory in the early 1900s.’
    • ‘It regularly functioned as a point of transition between the life of prayer in the oratory and the more routine actions of eating, sleeping, and administration organized around its perimeter.’
    • ‘The oratory provides them with a sanctuary to reflect while the immaculate gardens allow them to enjoy the serenity and scenery of the area.’
    • ‘We also visit the peaceful oratory and the Institute's chapel, where students can attend mass every day.’
    • ‘Stephen Tempest said that in 1453 the Archbishop of York granted a licence to Roger Tempest to establish a private oratory in his house.’
  • 2(in the Roman Catholic Church) a religious society of secular priests founded in Rome in 1564 to provide plain preaching and popular services and established in various countries.

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French oratorie, from ecclesiastical Latin oratorium, based on Latin orare ‘pray, speak’; sense 2 is from Congregation of the Fathers of the Oratory.

Pronunciation

oratory

/ˈɒrət(ə)ri/

Main definitions of oratory in English

: oratory1oratory2

oratory2

noun

mass noun
  • 1The art or practice of formal speaking in public.

    ‘the gift of persuasive oratory’
    • ‘Robinson divides Forensic Oratory into two parts, first discussing oratory in general and then exploring forensic oratory in particular.’
    • ‘And certainly, the two speeches delivered by Brutus and Antonius at the funeral are classics in oratory.’
    • ‘While men might employ poetry or oratory to criticize women, women compose and sing songs about men.’
    • ‘A celebrated public speaker, he established the tradition of commemorative oratory in the United States.’
    • ‘This is the way public meetings used to be when oratory mattered and they're surely not just there because they like the idea of not having to pay tuition fees.’
    • ‘In political oratory and pedagogy, as in the novel, the authority of displayed deliberation was pervasive.’
    • ‘Formal oratory notwithstanding, everyday speech is, on the other hand, largely informal and typically spontaneous.’
    • ‘The collection is enjoyable, and one can learn a fair bit about Thatcher herself, recent British political history, and oratory generally from listening.’
    • ‘Even by the dismal standards of modern political oratory, it was desperate stuff.’
    • ‘Rhetoric can be described as the art of composition, while oratory was the art of public speaking.’
    • ‘‘By any standards public oratory is appalling’, claimed Donald Horne in The Lucky Country.’
    • ‘They rank among the plainest final words in the history of oratory, yet they kindled great expectations.’
    • ‘Originally a term referring to the skills associated with public oratory, ‘rhetoric’ has come to mean the art of verbal discourse.’
    • ‘On the contrary, the art of persuasion, of which oratory is one branch, can never be much cultivated except in a free society.’
    • ‘Allen's primary intention, we can see, has been to explicate the art of oratory not for its own sake, but as a tool of social justice in general and of abolition.’
    • ‘It is instructive that Isocrates uses oral metaphors to describe the role of poetry and oratory in cultural reproduction and to convey the idea of an education he himself professes.’
    • ‘Fred Turner was a gifted speaker, attracted to books and public oratory.’
    • ‘Theology and history predominate; oratory, romance, philosophy, science, medicine, and lexicography also come within its scope.’
    • ‘Pointing out that his discourse is crafted not only for a festive display, but also for a particular historical moment, Isocrates affirms the legitimacy of oratory as a vehicle of political deliberation.’
    • ‘There are various different schools of public oratory.’
    rhetoric, eloquence, grandiloquence, magniloquence, public speaking, speech-making, declamation, way with words, the gift of the gab, fluency
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Eloquent or rhetorical language.
      ‘learned discussions degenerated into pompous oratory’
      • ‘His fervent soap-box oratory, rhetorical literary style, and experience as secretary of the Timber Workers Union brought a growing reputation.’
      • ‘Crowds delighted in speeches filled with double talk ridiculing the pompous, bombastic oratory that characterized familiar memorial rituals.’
      • ‘Parallels between persuasive oratory and eloquent musical performance are evident, but the precise relationship of music to rhetoric has often been unclear.’
      • ‘But at Davos, Chambers's persuasive oratory stole the show.’
      • ‘Although identified as a fierce partisan, he received high marks from members of both political parties for his hard work, reasonableness, and eloquent oratory.’
      • ‘The text of Chief Seattle's monologue has frequently appeared in anthologies of American Indian literature and oratory, but most do not identify its source.’
      • ‘Listen, I've had long conversations with him and Brown separately, and their level of rhetoric and oratory rises when they talk about this.’
      • ‘Elected to many political positions, including his appointment as mayor of Bogotá, Gaitán had captivated the country with his dynamic oratory and articulation of social problems.’
      • ‘The contemporary newspapers, even those opposed to George's policies, almost entirely agreed in paying tribute to his remarkable oratory and formidable rhetorical skills.’
      • ‘Now they could make up their own minds about the value of what the Prophet exemplified in his lifestyle and communicated with his brilliant oratory.’
      • ‘A cultural turn-around is usually marked by emotive rhetoric, sometimes even dazzling oratory.’
      • ‘The latter date commemorates the day King gave his famous ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, easily one of the greatest examples of oratory in American history.’
      • ‘Each of these bands was headed by both a war leader and a civil leader, the former chosen because of his reputation as a warrior, and the later chosen because of his eloquent oratory.’
      • ‘Contrary to popular belief, simple communication skills and good manners are more important than great oratory.’
      • ‘Aboriginal cultures also valued fine oratory and the languages were, and are, often poetic, inventive and witty.’
      • ‘These activities are spontaneous forms of heightened spoken language, much closer to casual speech than the older oratory.’
      • ‘Recently, however, a group of researchers led by James Cone has challenged this view, arguing that King's theology and oratory sprang mainly from his boyhood training at Ebenezer Church.’
      • ‘Eloquent oratory has long been an integral part of the Samoan culture.’
      • ‘In her public oratory and in letters to the newspapers, she urges people to sign the petition, offering them a voice in Congress even if laws and practices deny them an official vote on who serves in Congress.’
      • ‘Such oratory may offer proof that its subject is praiseworthy or blameworthy, but does not usually offer arguments for the values that underlie the speech.’

Origin

Early 16th century: from Latin oratoria, feminine (used as a noun) of oratorius ‘relating to an orator’.

Pronunciation

oratory

/ˈɒrət(ə)ri/