Definition of orate in English:

orate

Pronunciation: /ɒˈreɪt//ˈɔːreɪt/

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Make a speech, especially pompously or at length.

    ‘Hamlet thinks, speaks, orates, and acts’
    [with direct speech] ‘‘Lend me your ears,’ Fred orated’
    • ‘And if the television shows she had selected began to lose her attention, she'd orate.’
    • ‘When the headmaster attempted to take the money, the speaker moved it just beyond grasp while he orated on and on and on.’
    • ‘Most statues of King have him marching or holding his hand up and orating.’
    • ‘Ken Livingstone eventually emerged to orate about the day's Olympic bid.’
    • ‘Republican State Chairman Tina Benkiser will orate, flanked by representatives of organizations such as the Southern Baptists and the Texas Conference of Churches.’
    • ‘Whereas Olivier orates in his first scenes, Branagh converses.’
    • ‘I remember him orating to a crowd of 200 or so steel workers, and someone shouted, ‘Winterbottom, you're a nutcase’.’
    • ‘The pimply-faced pubescent gazed in wonderment as his elder sibling orated perceptively on the great mysteries of teenage life.’
    • ‘I recall, in my time here as a whip, which was some time ago, listening to him lamenting how members in the House had lost the ability to orate with skill.’
    • ‘And Adams, who the world likes, is there, orating, in the middle of what the world certainly does not like.’
    • ‘He lectured pairs of tourists, gestured and orated grandly, tried to recruit them to his cause, and promptly forgot that he ever saw them.’
    • ‘Our President isn't just going to just stand on a box and orate all the time.’
    • ‘Sticking to his set speech he orated on governance and standards.’
    • ‘Candidates may not move about the stage as they orate, nor may they question each other.’
    • ‘While Banquo is orating, just overhead a servant on his knees is scrubbing a bridge.’
    • ‘The girl or woman he was addressing seemed to be expected to sit in silence, marvelling at the brilliance of the person orating at her.’
    • ‘Still, with the thundering voice I'll bet he could certainly orate from the top of that tower.’
    • ‘He orates to overcapacity crowds on his favourite themes: ideology, psychoanalysis, religion and love.’
    • ‘Ali squeezed between the tables to capture our full attention, and began to orate: ‘Today, my dears, we have some specials.’’
    • ‘At the podium he stood erect as if he were Adolf orating to a crowd of Hitler Youths.’
    declaim, make a speech, hold forth, speak, discourse, pontificate, preach, sermonize, sound off, spout off
    spiel, speechify, mouth off
    perorate
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: back-formation from oration.

Pronunciation:

orate

/ɒˈreɪt//ˈɔːreɪt/