Definition of oracy in English:

oracy

noun

British
  • [mass noun] The ability to express oneself fluently and grammatically in speech.

    ‘infant teachers will be urged to concentrate on reading, writing, oracy and numeracy’
    • ‘And we're offering the students a program which not only develops their writing but their oracy from the beginning of schooling.’
    • ‘There are low levels of English literacy and oracy in many cases.’
    • ‘It is in this context of the various communicative competencies required for electronic production and consumption that the term ‘literacy’ (or for that matter ‘oracy’) is questionable.’
    • ‘It has given shape to much of the Western world's inheritance of oracy and literacy.’
    • ‘She says research by the program's originators, Brian Gray and Wendy Cowie, at the University of Canberra, indicates that written English is a vehicle and means of improving children's oracy.’

Origin

1960s: from Latin os, or- mouth, on the pattern of literacy.

Pronunciation:

oracy

/ˈɔːrəsi/