Definition of optic in English:

optic

adjective

  • Relating to the eye or vision.

    • ‘In 1892, there was only a rudimentary understanding of the relationship between increased intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy.’
    • ‘‘Good,’ he said, ‘and what are the causes of primary optic atrophy?’’
    • ‘Vigilance is needed for any features of possible optic neuropathy, such as blurred vision, impaired colour perception, and reduced visual acuity’
    • ‘The ophthalmic artery may have a separate foramen located between the optic foramen and the superior orbital fissure.’
    • ‘All patients were diagnosed as having anterior optic neuropathy.’
    optical, seeing, optic, ocular, eye
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noun

  • 1A lens or other optical component in an optical instrument.

    • ‘The shop, primarily, handles optics from Leupold and Swift Instruments.’
    • ‘Roseann Hanson has been a professional natural history guide and a field-tester of outdoor optics for the past five years.’
    • ‘Not only does the lens have the power of some of the white-coloured optics you've seen at sidelines of football matches and other sporting events, the Leica-made zoom features image stabilisation to reduce blur too.’
    • ‘They presented us with a great channel to reach those who want to buy high-quality optics for their firearms.’
    • ‘This method is reasonably adequate for small optics but breaks down when the optic is exposed to beams substantially larger than the area tested.’
  • 2humorous, archaic The eye.

    organ of sight, eyeball
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  • 3British trademark A device fastened to the neck of an inverted bottle for measuring out spirits.

    • ‘Skinner once again has optics filled with various spirits mounted on the drum riser, allowing him to distribute drinks to the front row.’
    • ‘It's a small vacuum optic that is attached to the top of a bottle after it has been opened to stop oxygen getting in and ruining wine.’
    • ‘The group of fourth-year Master of Engineering degree students have designed a new optic which can dispense either single or double shots of spirits in a single, quick operation.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French optique or medieval Latin opticus, from Greek optikos, from optos seen.

Pronunciation:

optic

/ˈɒptɪk/