Definition of op in English:

op

noun

informal
  • 1A surgical operation.

    ‘a minor op’
    • ‘Until the double transplant ops, Laura was forced to spend nine hours every day hooked up to a dialysis machine.’
    • ‘‘It varies from traumatic amputation landmine injuries, gunshot wounds, motor vehicle accidents or elective cases through to minor ops,’ he said.’
    • ‘Next month, she will have been off booze and cocaine for three years and ops to rebuild her nose have been a success.’
    • ‘It will separate planned surgery from emergency care so patients do not face cancelled ops at the 11 th hour.’
    • ‘More worrying is that they are encouraged to use national health beds and operating theaters to do private ops the next day.’
    1. 1.1ops Military operations.
      as modifier ‘the ops room’
      • ‘Weather has a huge impact on military ops, ‘from the mud to the sun’ as they say.’
      • ‘Third, I think it's interesting to note that the CIA is one of the leading employers taking personnel away from military special ops.’
      • ‘This leaves very little capability with which to airlift anything else - for humanitarian ops in the Sudan, or contingency operations in East Asia, for example.’
      • ‘Sunday night we played for the operation warrior's foundation which is basically they raise funds for children of special ops forces that have been killed in action to send their children to college.’
      • ‘‘The Spanish special ops team came in first and did the take down, meaning they took the ship,’ said Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt.’
      • ‘Just as I turned toward Aircraft Issue, the squadron ops officer chimed in.’
      • ‘The force is designed, built, and skilled for integrated, networked operations that make today's joint ops seem clumsy.’
      • ‘In the first week of ops, the Army Field Force Group cleared 147 houses, 28 flats and two warehouses.’
      • ‘I'm not sure why, other than many critics don't know squat about military ops.’
      • ‘I doubt it, terrorism is all about covert ops, stealthy operations and leaving as little evidence and traces as possible.’
      • ‘That means bunker-busters, covert ops - whatever ensures America is safe.’
      • ‘However, there's a big difference between this and Desert One in that this event was forecast well in advance and thoroughly planned for; very focused ops would continue where the weather would allow.’
      • ‘But then, when you put together all these elements, you realize that this rather significant Special Forces operation really indicates that special ops has come of age.’
      • ‘Consider the rarity of a Vickers gun - handmade by an 18-year-veteran of not just Special Forces, but the most elite group in the entire spec ops community.’
      • ‘The special ops units have been losing men to the private security firms, who pay between $100,000 a year and $200,000 a year, rather more than do the US armed services.’
      • ‘So, we're keeping some of our men there, but they were going to send me in for a special ops things, you know.’
      • ‘Officers who serve on the line - be they CIA, or special forces ops, or undercover local narcotics cops in your town - these people serve because they must.’
      • ‘The men and women of the various special ops teams have taken part in a host of operations - from flood relief actions in Ivory Park to earthquake relief in Algeria, Iran and India.’
      • ‘If you don't hear from us in an hour, send a special ops team down into the city and sweep it clean.’
      • ‘And I think they're probably North Korean special ops.’
  • 2A radio or telephone operator.

    • ‘Assistant engineer makes it sound rather grand, they were just called tape ops really, the skivvies of the recording studio.’
    • ‘The question for cable ops is who can get and keep that digital box into the home, and who can make more incremental cash flow?’
    • ‘When you have those ops interconnected with each other, you are going to get quality problems, and I think that's one of the major issues at the moment.’
    • ‘(He was an air OP in the war and has just finished a stint as officer in charge of Windsor Castle.)’
    • ‘It's a tricky equation - one few cable ops can afford to lose.’

Pronunciation

op

/ɒp/