Definition of on the hoof in English:

on the hoof

phrase

  • 1(of livestock) not yet slaughtered.

    ‘livestock on the hoof’
    • ‘It made you gaze knowingly out over the herd as if you were calculating what they'd bring on the hoof at market.’
    • ‘‘It would be so much more humane to send them on the hook, and not on the hoof,’ said SPCA local manager Marie Eekhout.’
    • ‘This all seemed to work well, but as well as this, according to the regulations, you must have a vet to first inspect all slaughter animals on the hoof - thus adding to the expense.’
    • ‘Moreover, the settlers augmented the Aboriginal food supply by providing them with dogs to hunt kangaroos plus a plentiful supply of beef and lamb on the hoof.’
    • ‘The continuing recovery of the live export trade resulted in the export on the hoof of 113,000 head, and increase of 67,000 head, but still well below the level of thirty years ago.’
    • ‘The levy of 30% on cattle exported on the hoof, on the other hand, is aimed at discouraging the export of live animals from the country.’
    • ‘In the past the production, distribution and circulation of buffaloes, both on the hoof and as meat, were controlled by the nobility and other wealthy commoners.’
    • ‘It is also used by a number of exporters in the Irish livestock industry who ship cattle on the hoof to Lebanon, Egypt and Europe.’
    • ‘Remember that we're talking about an animal that weighs all of 110 lb. on the hoof.’
    • ‘He said livestock was judged on the hoof at the show and subsequently slaughtered at the East London abattoir.’
  • 2British informal Without proper thought or preparation.

    ‘policy was made on the hoof’
    • ‘The spectacle of government policy being manufactured on the hoof left an indelible stain.’
    • ‘They were instead consummate opportunists, wily politicians who made up policy on the hoof.’
    • ‘It is worse when the government appears to make policy on the hoof.’
    • ‘Unfortunately they look set to continue the trend of setting parking policy on the hoof, in response to short-term financial pressures rather than in accordance with a long-term vision.’
    • ‘But too often, he appears to be making up crime policy on the hoof, like his decision today to release hundreds of criminals early because the prisons are full.’
    • ‘Are we about to witness more policy made on the hoof, or is this merely evidence they are struggling to defend the indefensible against valid widespread public protest?’
    • ‘One Scottish advertising director, who did not wish to be named, said: ‘It really has been devised on the hoof.’’
    • ‘If you're a struggling authority, you court further disaster if you try to make policy on the hoof.’
    • ‘He made up policies on the hoof with his spin doctors, sometimes minutes before appearing on television.’
    • ‘So rather than doing it on the hoof, as it were, perhaps your Lordships would be minded to adopt our suggestion.’