Definition of old dear in English:

old dear

noun

informal
  • A patronizing term for an elderly woman.

    • ‘Two nice old dears are sitting in the foyer of Woburn Elderly Care, a rest home and hospital run by the Presbyterian Church.’
    • ‘It sometimes seems the only roles left to them are monstrous mothers and dotty old dears.’
    • ‘You should have seen the old dears tutting away.’
    • ‘I remember the poor old dear in the bed next to me had virtually no drink the whole day.’
    • ‘I am in a hotel three quarters full of white-haired old dears.’
    • ‘Then the old dear leaned across the stand and said, ‘May I?’’
    • ‘These people don't fit the danger-driver stereotype - they aren't boy racers or doddery old dears who go everywhere in third gear.’
    • ‘As the final moments of conference neared, an innocent-looking old dear distributed the words of all six inspiring verses round the back of the hall.’
    • ‘‘And I can spend more time with the old dear here,’ he says, nodding in the direction of Suzanne.’
    • ‘It has a faint odour of the 50s, of old dears knitting and nodding.’
    • ‘When I see all the old dears it makes me think of my mum and her mates going to oldies' aerobics back home.’
    • ‘One old dear brought the second half of a play at the National to a halt when she had trouble with her hearing aid.’
    • ‘‘Let's give the doubting old dear a surprise,’ she said.’
    • ‘One contained two old dears gamely trying to lever themselves out of their seats.’
    • ‘They take personal fitness very seriously here, with even the old dears in their eighties and nineties taking part.’
    • ‘Both arenas require the deft verisimilitude of the stage actor, the ability to squeeze a tear from the old dear in the back row.’
    • ‘We were a bit of a handful, the four of us, and the old dear needed some help to ensure we ate our fish fingers.’
    • ‘An old dear living on a council estate takes him in and teaches him to care for himself.’
    • ‘When she walked through the lobby an old dear loudly told her friend, ‘I do find women in jeans so very common’.’
    • ‘There was an old dear on the telly the other day who was about 80.’

Pronunciation:

old dear

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