Definition of Okie in English:

Okie

noun

US
informal
  • 1A native or inhabitant of Oklahoma.

    ‘a grim-faced Okie’
    as modifier ‘an extended Okie family’
    • ‘He picks from sunrise to sundown for an old Okie family.’
    • ‘The mind reels and the stomach churns along to this blue-eyed Okie funk-rock.’
    • ‘Dean doesn't talk to the women and they return to the Okie house where the daughter is afraid of Dean.’
    • ‘Janet, the Okie woman, breaks a Dizzy Gillespie record over Dean's head.’
    • ‘Although my speech classes eliminated most if it, I still have a little Okie accent left.’
    • ‘But background never counts for much in pop music - remember the young Dylan's acquired Okie accent?’
    • ‘It seemed like we were waiting for a ringmaster to come out, but instead, four shaggy-haired Okie boys bounded on stage and launched into their riffy emo rock.’
    • ‘When I was 12 in the early 1960s, my Okie father bought me a bottle of cherry vodka, which I could drink when I wanted.’
    • ‘It features a soundtrack by fellow Okies The Flaming Lips.’
    • ‘A touring singer of the ‘country crooning style’, her cheery Okie songs - covered in the spit and hiss of old 78s - heighten the play's avant-weird air.’
    • ‘The Okie goes in search for his brother and brings back money.’
    1. 1.1historical, derogatory A migrant agricultural worker from Oklahoma who had been forced to leave a farm during the depression of the 1930s.
      • ‘They come to a blockade where they are kept from entering a town that does not want any ‘goddamn Okies.’’
      • ‘I love that idea of an adult influence on kids and also the idea that those children, the Okies, at that time were considered un-teachable.’
      • ‘The depictions of Okies as too stupid to scratch themselves show Steinbeck up for the product of an affluent middle class Coast family that he was.’
      • ‘They wanted to keep the Okies out of their stores and out of their schools.’
      • ‘We can't let these Okies get out of hand.’

Pronunciation

Okie

/ˈəʊki/