Definition of offspring in English:

offspring

noun

  • 1A person's child or children.

    ‘the offspring of middle-class parents’
    • ‘True, he had expected me - more than any of his other offspring - to become the politician of the family.’
    • ‘Parents expect too much from their offspring and the children are unable to meet it.’
    • ‘The best solution on offer rests solely with the parents, as their offspring are a reflection of them.’
    • ‘Many parents moan about their offspring rising at the crack of dawn.’
    • ‘When my offspring were tiny, it was the thing that made it so you could tell which of their drawings was of me.’
    • ‘It could be argued that parents subsidising their offspring's first house purchase is not necessarily a good thing.’
    • ‘They play the offspring of two warring criminal families who join forces to try and bring peace to the neighbourhood.’
    • ‘Although it may deeply embarrass their teenage offspring, parents love to record family outings and special occasions for posterity.’
    • ‘Many parents have pulled their offspring out of school altogether, worried about the chaos on the streets.’
    • ‘Jim warned him prior to introducing him to Hannah that the youngest Dawson offspring is a charmer.’
    • ‘When parents accuse their offspring of treating the place like a hotel they are usually quite accurate.’
    • ‘In all cases, the parents revealed their offspring were kicking a ball, handling a racquet or racing about before their fifth birthday.’
    • ‘Admittedly, for its target audience of parents and accompanying offspring this is a safe bet.’
    • ‘Parents have a special seating area from where they can keep a close eye on their offspring as the children burn off some excess energy.’
    • ‘Grandparents, particularly grandmothers, cared for the offspring of married sons or daughters.’
    • ‘Parents let their offspring roam the streets quite happily, not knowing what they are up to.’
    • ‘A traditional craft, it is passed on from parents to their offspring.’
    • ‘However, to avoid paying strangers to look after their offspring, should parents be forced to ask such a task of their own parents?’
    • ‘Leaving a small child at day care can be a traumatic experience for both the parents and their offspring.’
    • ‘Many parents also introduce limited alcohol at home when their offspring are young, on the grounds that they must learn how to handle the substance.’
    children, sons and daughters, progeny, family, youngsters, babies, brood
    child, baby, infant, son, daughter, youngster, little one, tot, tiny tot
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An animal's young.
      • ‘It is the offspring of the onion fly, which sometimes flits about among the young onions at this season.’
      • ‘When the mouse bred with a normal female, his offspring retained the ability to fight off cancer.’
      • ‘However, the real way to make money in Wildlife Park is to get your animals to mate and then sell the offspring.’
      • ‘The offspring of control animals were kept under the same conditions.’
      • ‘Much of that outlay can be recouped by selling the offspring of the bird to other breeders at, say, £5,000 a bird.’
      • ‘Many species of animals gather in groups to rest or raise their offspring.’
      • ‘Packs are typically composed of an alpha pair and their offspring, including young of previous years.’
      • ‘European boars interbred with the Polynesians' small pigs, and the offspring ran wild.’
      • ‘In Kekexili, he encountered large groups of female antelopes with their offspring.’
      • ‘The first offspring of the animal is passed on to a neighbouring poor family, so that the benefit is multiplied each year.’
      • ‘After that, she lived alone in the woods, surrounded by the offspring of her cream-colored cat.’
      • ‘Researchers not too long ago successfully bred the offspring of two ‘species’ of Galapagos finches.’
      • ‘Even animals chastise their offspring with a little nip of pain to teach them to behave.’
      • ‘The young bird is the offspring of the well-known pair of black eagles that nests in the Walter Sisulu Botanical Garden.’
      • ‘Those calves include the offspring of the cow that tested positive for the disease.’
      • ‘Bird watchers will also be able to see the adult male teach his offspring how to snatch fish from the lake over the next few weeks.’
      • ‘Until the bird learns the tricky task of catching its own fish, the adult birds will continue to deliver food to their offspring.’
      • ‘Soon a little coop was constructed in the back garden and the duck and her eight offspring were installed in their new home.’
      • ‘The ‘isolated’ case of one cow has become the case of the cow and her two offspring.’
      • ‘When fully grown up, the offspring of birds and animals abandon their parents, and carve out a world of their own.’
    2. 1.2 The product or result of something.
      ‘German nationalism was the offspring of military ambition’
      • ‘Humourless and heavy-hearted love only produces hate as its offspring.’
      • ‘Indeed, 100 years of germ theory has spawned impressive germ-fighting offspring.’

Origin

Old English ofspring (see off, spring).

Pronunciation

offspring

/ˈɒfsprɪŋ/