Definition of offset in English:

offset

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈɒfsɛt/
  • 1A consideration or amount that diminishes or balances the effect of an opposite one:

    ‘widow's bereavement allowance is an offset against income’
    • ‘Thus, offsets may be considered a form of indirect subsidization, and possibly a second-best, or blunt form of government intervention or commercial policy.’
    • ‘Consequently, there is a need for an offset as personal household savings rates begin to rise.’
    • ‘The nub of the matter is who controls what and what offsets there are in the boardroom to dominant forces in companies.’
    • ‘The eruption caused a temporary offset to the greenhouse effect, due to the increased rate of photosynthesis under diffuse light.’
    • ‘There was, however, property tax on man-made capital to be reduced as an offset to higher tax on pure land rents.’
    • ‘We'll gladly talk to whoever wins the competition about offsets when the contract is signed.’
    • ‘In addition, the economy is benefiting from some powerful offsets to the higher oil tab.’
    • ‘An offset is considered a benefit to you because the money was used to pay your debts, the IRS says.’
    • ‘These are known as carbon offsets through carbon sequestration.’
    • ‘Furthermore, no offset of personal allowances or tax credits will be allowable against tax arising at this low rate.’
    • ‘The Italian, Austrian, Portuguese, Spanish, Greek, Norwegian and Danish governments insist on offsets equivalent to the full price of defence industry contracts.’
    • ‘An individual can obtain relief on an annual investment of up to €31,750 by way of offset against taxable income.’
    • ‘Countries will make bilateral agreements to transfer clean technology and provide development assistance, possibly creating emission offsets for participating countries.’
    • ‘It worked, and since then we have raised much material, both from further offsets, as well as from seed, and distributed material to other growers.’
    • ‘Policyholders receive the subsidy through a 30 percent reduction in the insurance premium, as a payment from the Health Insurance Commission or as a tax offset at the end of the year.’
    • ‘The other is to find offsets for what we are doing so we don't use Medicare funds and we don't open up the tax cut.’
    • ‘The results are centered, economic, and if occasionally obvious, prove an effective offset to vocals that run from austere to jarringly dense and discordant.’
    • ‘Consumers bear the real cost of health care through wage offsets or through higher prices for U.S. output.’
    • ‘The only offset to rising real rates that I can see is a reduction in the government's holding of debt, which would free funds for the private sector.’
    • ‘Thus interest relief of 5 per cent is only available for offset against the rental income.’
  • 2The amount or distance by which something is out of line:

    ‘these wheels have an offset of four inches’
    • ‘The offset between the two trails corresponds to the difference of the lines-of-sight from the two telescopes.’
    • ‘Try different putter styles and offsets until you find one that seems easiest to get on the target line at address.’
    • ‘At least four measurements are required, as there are four unknowns: three coordinates of position plus the receiver clock offset.’
    • ‘Pile head displacement was measured automatically every 5 minutes by four displacement gauges at 90° offsets mounted on two reference beams supported by steel posts on either side.’
    • ‘It is expected however that progress in clock technology will in the future allow the control of the time offset to within 1 ns.’
    • ‘Three aspects of the wheels are relevant to the suspension design: wheel offset, aspect ratio, and tire width.’
    • ‘The FIFO buffer is sized to include a number of storage cells equal to the product of the maximum frequency offset between the write clock and read clock and the maximum number of data units in a packet.’
    • ‘One and two-way range observations were used and both position and clock offset were estimated.’
    • ‘From this adjustment we can determine the offset and rotations to align the vehicle platform and digital video camera reference frames.’
    • ‘Combining these two types of data we computed the offset between UTC and GPS Time for the whole time span of the test.’
    • ‘The first is the moment at a two-degree offset of the initial slope.’
    • ‘First comes the original measurement, then the actual offset between brackets, then the margin of error.’
    • ‘The offset between the mean phase center and the geometric center of an antenna can range from a few millimeters to several centimeters.’
    1. 2.1Surveying A short distance measured perpendicularly from the main line of measurement:
      ‘if it was a simple curve, he was taught the ‘ranging by offsets’ technique’
      • ‘The first segments make offsets on the abscissas and are steeper and extend approximately above C = 30%.’
      • ‘We can estimate this deviation by measuring the same step height with different offsets, or different average positions, of the scanner relative to the surface.’
      • ‘The accuracy in measuring the vertical offset is constrained by the resolution of the available maps and errors are no more than + / - 10 m.’
      • ‘The offset is determined by a self-calibration logic that uses the same type of delay units.’
    2. 2.2Electronics A small deviation or bias in a voltage or current:
      [as modifier] ‘offset adjustment circuits’
      • ‘Before recordings, the offset of the electrodes was measured and appropriate corrections made to recorded values.’
      • ‘The architecture has a block that measures and cancels any remaining DC offset.’
      • ‘Concerning the gyroscope, two parameters need to be calibrated: voltage offset and volts per degrees per second.’
      • ‘Voltage sensors can set secure voltage offsets.’
      • ‘A second lookup table stores a plurality of DC adjust values, which are added during operation to further reduce DC offset.’
  • 3A side shoot from a plant serving for propagation:

    ‘a present of tulip bulbs, offsets, and seeds for his garden’
    • ‘Only offsets - small bulblets that sometimes grow alongside the parent bulb - will produce identical blooms to the parent.’
    • ‘The bulbs spread thanks to the fluctuating stream that carries and deposits them along the length of the wood, and by producing offsets or bulblets.’
    • ‘When an offset forms, let it grow to at least half the size of the mother plant before separating.’
    • ‘Most gardeners propagate sagos from offsets from the mother plant, but you can sow fertilized seeds.’
    • ‘To divide them, separate offsets from mother bulbs.’
    • ‘They multiply by offsets - little plants that form along the sides of the parent.’
    • ‘Propagation from offsets is a fairly easy task.’
    • ‘If, however, you want to try for another generation, you can; mother plants produce new plants called offsets, or pups, before they die.’
    • ‘Propagation is rarely from seed as the colonies of bulbs spread and divide up into offsets freely.’
    • ‘The plant is propagated by separating offsets from its large onion-like bulbs.’
    • ‘When the offsets are well-developed with a few roots at the base, they can be removed from the parent plant with a clean, sharp knife.’
    • ‘For those that do not produce seeds or offsets readily, propagation by bulb-scales is resorted to, each healthy scale being capable of producing a new bulb at its base.’
    • ‘The offsets are usually connected to the parent by a single root that's easy to sever.’
    • ‘The Hippeastrum is easily multiplied in the original pot itself by bulbous offsets, which may be separated and potted.’
    • ‘They rarely increase from seed, instead multiplying fairly rapidly from offsets of the mother bulb.’
    • ‘I was amazed to find that the comfrey plants (I planted the offsets last Thursday) which were only just sprouting a couple of days ago, all now have proper leaves!’
    1. 3.1 A spur in a mountain range.
  • 4Architecture
    A sloping ledge in a wall or other feature where the thickness of the part above is diminished.

    • ‘Similar cracks occur at offsets in masonry walls.’
    • ‘You can also specify part wall thickness or clearance offset.’
  • 5A bend in a pipe to carry it past an obstacle:

    ‘allow for any bend you need including offsets for connecting the downpipe’
    • ‘This will allow for the offset of the venting elbow.’
  • 6[mass noun], [often as modifier] A method of printing in which ink is transferred from a plate or stone to a uniform rubber surface and from that to the paper:

    ‘they produced banknotes by offset’
    [as modifier] ‘offset printing’
    • ‘They are printed by offset and are sold by open subscription.’
    • ‘One notable exception to the norm is an offset litho print of Mandela, dated 1989.’
    • ‘It is within that context that we should see this group of about one hundred offset lithographs published in 1970 and 1971.’
    • ‘‘It is one of the most heated debates in the print world: offset vs. direct lithography,’ said Creyts.’
    • ‘One side has optimum freedom from surface imperfections; supplied with a maximum degree of flatness, for use as a plate in offset printing.’
    • ‘The offset printing machines allow the simultaneous printing of both sides of the banknotes.’
    • ‘The most interesting is the offset monopoint, which was designed to put the weight of the front points directly under the big toe, as would naturally occur in rock climbing.’
    • ‘All stamps in Taiwan are made using the offset printing technique, the most basic, which further undercuts their appeal.’
    • ‘A canvas print is created when inks are applied directly to canvas using offset printing techniques.’

verb

Pronunciation: /ˈɒfsɛt//ɒfˈsɛt/
  • 1[with object] Counteract (something) by having an equal and opposite force or effect:

    ‘donations to charities can be offset against tax’
    ‘his unfortunate appearance was offset by a compelling personality’
    • ‘But part of the profit pressure is offset - at least on the income statement - with nonoperating gains.’
    • ‘The key question is whether wages will continue to grow fast enough to offset rising energy prices.’
    • ‘While the video has an awful amount of artifacting, it is somewhat offset by the above average audio track.’
    • ‘Previously, acute staff shortages had been partially offset by large amounts of overtime.’
    • ‘The lack of laughter in the auditorium is offset only by our blind hope that there is method in this madness and that an explanation is around the corner.’
    • ‘Initially they will accelerate, but they will soon reach a constant terminal velocity when the air resistance around them offsets their downward acceleration.’
    • ‘So world markets tend to move in tandem, and foreign investment, especially index investing, offsets domestic risk less than it once did.’
    • ‘An increasing university student population has partly offset these effects.’
    • ‘With job losses in manufacturing and agriculture offset by job gains in construction, unemployment has remained low.’
    • ‘Wi-Fi's strength as a broadband access technology has always been offset by its poor range.’
    • ‘Economics teaches us that lower margins are not necessarily bad and can be offset when a market is growing rapidly.’
    • ‘Because oil is priced in dollars the surge in oil prices for the past few years has been offset by the strong euro which traded as high as $1.33 at one point in the cycle.’
    • ‘Improvements in electricity and water supply have been offset by disruption caused by sabotage.’
    • ‘In some instances, any tendency to increase prices may be more than offset by efficiencies resulting from a merger.’
    • ‘The decline in the primary sector was to an extent offset by the growth in production in the secondary sector.’
    • ‘Correctly practiced martial arts can help offset these conditions or at least minimize their effects.’
    • ‘Improved nutrition in some countries is being more than offset by a decline in others.’
    • ‘Designing in the shade garden offers many challenges, but the wide palette of material that is available offsets this.’
    • ‘The educational costs were offset by reduced payroll costs, so there was a pay-back in less than six months.’
    • ‘All this upward pressure in demand offsets to a large degree the downward pull of rising interest rates in the national real estate market.’
    counterbalance, balance, balance out, cancel, cancel out, even out, even up, counteract, counterpoise, countervail, equalize, neutralize, nullify, compensate for, make up for, make good, redeem, indemnify
    atone for, redress, make amends for, make restitution for
    equilibrize
    View synonyms
  • 2[with object] Place out of line:

    ‘several places where the ridge was offset at right angles to its length’
    • ‘A full frame consists of two 1920x540 line fields, offset slightly.’
    • ‘Climbing the stairs to the upper room you are confronted with The Great Outdoors, a painting with a brave composition of a figure offset to one side of an infinite blue sky.’
    • ‘In places these are offset along lines that run at right angles to the magnetic lineaments, but the reasons for this remained a mystery.’
    • ‘Lay out the pieces offset like bricks, in three rows of four rectangles.’
    • ‘The lens-fiber assembly includes a casing having a first hole and a second hole offset from the first hole.’
    • ‘The pivotable attachment of the cylinder may be horizontally and vertically offset from a pivot connection of the scissors lift.’
    • ‘In shape it is like a distorted mushroom with a very short stem offset to the side and attached to the tree.’
    • ‘The Nepali cap, with its peak offset from the center, giving it a slightly lopsided look, completes the outfit.’
    • ‘Begin by overflying the entire runway at least 500 feet above pattern altitude, offset enough to see the wind and landing indicators below.’
    • ‘Jonas asked curiously as he guided me towards a classroom, a little offset from the main hallway.’
    • ‘The centre of the ring, which is 12 billion miles wide, is offset slightly from the star, suggesting that gravity of unseen planets is dragging it askew.’
    • ‘Beams spanning the roof to shoring towers on either side were located slightly offset from roof arches, which align with skylight mullions.’
  • 3[no object] (of ink or a freshly printed page) transfer an impression to the next leaf or sheet:

    ‘there was some offsetting on to text’

Pronunciation:

offset

Noun/ˈɒfsɛt/

offset

Verb/ˈɒfsɛt//ɒfˈsɛt/