Definition of offload in English:

offload

Pronunciation: /ˈɒfləʊd//ɒfˈləʊd/

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Unload (a cargo):

    ‘a delivery could be offloaded immediately on arrival’
    • ‘The teachers from the orphanage immediately formed a line to help us offload our cargo.’
    • ‘To our pleasant surprise, the luggage had been offloaded more quickly than we were used to.’
    • ‘We're going to drop in on Deidre's mum and offload most of our luggage, taking only overnight bags with us to Sydney.’
    • ‘There was no standard gauge in Australia, which meant that at each break, all passengers and goods had to be offloaded and changed onto another train.’
    • ‘‘They are the biggest pipes ever used in the country, and they are all offloaded at our harbour,’ Saith said.’
    • ‘He said that the company was manufacturing its own spare parts and other accessories for the machinery a development that caused considerable cut down on time to load and offload cargo.’
    • ‘About 400 farmers from various parts of the country prevented a shipment of 3,100 tonnes of wheat being offloaded from a ship that had docked at Drogheda Port 10 days ago.’
    • ‘By the end of June, over 289,827 tons of supplies had been offloaded onto the Normandy beaches.’
    • ‘A decision on the contentious breakwater, a rail spur for trains to offload and collect cargo, has delayed the tender process since the team first met in September last year.’
    • ‘They quickly offloaded the much-needed cargo.’
    • ‘Although the UK was a key destination, some drugs were also offloaded in Bulgaria and sold here, he said.’
    • ‘There's additional fodder on the ship that will be offloaded for the sheep as well.’
    • ‘Radice claims cargo taken up by space shuttle from Earth can be offloaded onto an orbiting ‘tether’.’
    • ‘Soon he joined the green-smocked staff, offloading pallets and restocking shelves.’
    • ‘‘The logs will most probably be offloaded directly onto trucks which will take them to wherever they will be stored,’ he said.’
    • ‘Fixed-wing air land is the next most responsive mode, because it travels at the fastest speeds and the cargo can be offloaded quickly at the destination airstrip.’
    • ‘Salvors are offloading potentially hazardous cargo from the ship which ran aground near Grosvenor Point off the Wild Coast on Saturday night.’
    unload, dump, jettison, discharge, unship, deposit, drop, get rid of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Rid oneself of (something) by selling or passing it on to someone else:
      ‘a dealer offloaded 5,000 of these shares on a client’
      • ‘Through simultaneous spending hikes and tax cuts, he offloaded onto future generations responsibility to foot the bill for the present generation's security.’
      • ‘Making an exit occurs when a venture capitalist offloads their stake in an unquoted company.’
      • ‘This means that they must, legally and constitutionally, seek to offload as many of their costs onto other people or the environment as they can.’
      • ‘That left scalpers who had expected to sell seats for many times their face value scrambling to offload them at knock-down prices.’
      • ‘Often they were offloading defective goods they could not sell at a shop.’
      • ‘Currently, shareholders who want to offload shares sell back their stakes to the group.’
      • ‘He took advantage of strong gains in the company's share price this year to offload some of his stake, although he still owns 10% of the £228m company.’
      • ‘All we have to do now is locate a suitable restaurant for our Sunday evening meal; a job I plan to offload onto a Spanish speaking member of the choir.’
      • ‘He will probably also get higher prices when he offloads marginal stores if he can sell them at a measured pace.’
      • ‘Yet with annual medical costs averaging nearly $9,000 per employee, there's little doubt that U.S. corporations need to offload some of this burden.’
      • ‘Giving the UN a role could soothe anti-American tempers and offload some of the burden of responsibility.’
      • ‘The business was one of a number to have been offloaded in recent years, leaving Dawson as a focused cashmere yarn spinning and garment sales group.’
      • ‘They offload them at their factory outlets or sell them to furniture warehouses.’
      • ‘We ended up offloading the tickets and my friend's daughter and walked back to her house via a food stop with my son sleeping in his pram.’
      • ‘The EU pays 2.7 billion euros a year to farmers to grow sugar beet, and then offloads the resulting surpluses on the world market.’
      • ‘As living-wage laws get broader and more expansive, supporters are also trying to offload some of the cost, increasingly burdensome to cities, onto state and federal government.’
      • ‘Any airport sale in Scotland is likely to centre around Glasgow, which could be offloaded to a private bidder who could then refocus the business on low-cost airlines, killing off Prestwick.’
      • ‘He sold his synthesizers, offloaded his collection of more than 200 records and switched his focus to books.’
      • ‘I've gradually been offloading my comics and web commitments onto the community without them suffering.’
      • ‘Banks are increasingly offloading cash machines to finance companies, which impose a so-called ‘convenience’ fee.’
      dispose of, dump, jettison, get rid of, transfer, shift
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Relieve oneself of (a problem or worry) by talking to someone else:
      ‘it would be nice to have been able to offload your worries on to someone’
      • ‘It's like you're using me to offload all your troubles and I'm sick!’
      • ‘Before I cover the combat, I'll offload all the negative comments I have.’
      • ‘I'm sorry to offload all this onto you but I guess its just fair to warn you what you may be getting yourself into.’
      • ‘‘Hairdressing salons are no longer the place to go to have your hair restyled, you can chill out, get a massage or go in and talk to your stylist and offload all your problems,’ says the writer.’
    3. 1.3Computing Move (data or a task) from one processor to another in order to free the first processor for other tasks:
      ‘a system designed to offload the text on to a host computer’
      • ‘Luckily, Linux makes it possible to set up workstations with minimal Linux installations that offload most of the work to a powerful, central server.’
      • ‘This allows them to offload much of the communications processing from the operating systems and CPU.’
      • ‘To provide the highest possible server performance, the vendor may want to offload as much I / O processing as possible from the server CPU to the HBA.’
      • ‘The hardware initiator provides maximum benefit to the host CPU processing by offloading both the networking and iSCSI stack processing, and also provides remote booting capability.’
      • ‘The Amiga was able to offer advanced sound and graphics through custom chips that offloaded many of the tasks that would have otherwise been the responsibility of the processor.’

Pronunciation:

offload

/ˈɒfləʊd//ɒfˈləʊd/