Definition of official secret in English:

official secret

noun

British
  • A piece of confidential information that is important for national security:

    ‘it is a crime to disclose an official secret’
    • ‘The RAF were so determined to keep the incident secret, they declared his two suicide notes official secrets and only allowed his mother to read one.’
    • ‘He said the head of the relevant administrative unit would determine which information constituted an official secret.’
    • ‘It is interesting that the attorney general's advice should still be an official secret despite the freedom of information act.’
    • ‘As for the film, members of production team kept all information close to their hearts as if it were some official secret!’
    • ‘According to Article 1 of the bill, official secrets relate to all information or things relevant to state security.’
    • ‘The former MI5 officer, who is also challenging Mr Blair, was jailed in 2002 for revealing official secrets.’
    • ‘For four decades the location of his grave remained an official secret.’
    • ‘Would he be prosecuted for leaking official secrets?’
    • ‘The case against Burrell was hardly an official secret.’
    • ‘According to its text, state action is required whenever official secrets are ‘revealed’ and thus ‘important public interests endangered.’’
    • ‘The event which occurred on August 21, 1915, when an entire battalion was gone in the presence of other people, had been an official secret for over fifty years.’
    • ‘As a result the draconian machinery protecting official secrets is now looking increasingly unworkable; a review has been set up and reform seems inevitable.’
    • ‘The plant Deny discovered in 1937 seems to have disappeared and the location of the one from which he took specimens has been kept an official secret.’
    • ‘I should like to emphasise with all the power at my command that this case is not primarily about national security or official secrets.’
    • ‘The British government can restrict individual liberties, limit access to official secrets, and so on, in ways which would be intolerable to most Americans.’
    • ‘This woman says that the government knows who the Anthrax mailer is, but won't reveal his name because he's a former government employee who knows official secrets.’
    • ‘The media's role as critic, investigator, vigilant sceptic and scourge of official secrets is essential in any democracy.’
    • ‘The state imagines its citizens as untrustworthy, as objects of information, and therefore it needs official secrets in order to protect its knowledge from us, the citizens.’
    • ‘Whether they also provided a significant body of intelligence remains an official secret.’
    • ‘Apart from extending the protection of official secrets to include any government document, the Bill makes it easier to jail journalists or anyone else found with a leaked government document.’

Pronunciation:

official secret

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