Definition of off-centre in English:

off-centre

adjective & adverb

  • 1Not quite in the centre of something.

    as adjective ‘the main axes of the quadrangle are off-centre’
    as adverb ‘if the ball's struck off-centre, it will wobble’
    • ‘An extra arm placed off-centre wouldn't do, you see, but Medusa-style hair of snakes would be fine (so long as it was balanced by a single of similar scale - say, a large beard).’
    • ‘There's a slightly off-centre 4in screen alongside a four-way navigation control with a separate button in the middle.’
    • ‘Many had off-centre bores, which affected not only accuracy but also greatly weakened their breech ends, rendering them liable to burst.’
    • ‘Final position of the tummy button may be off-centre.’
    • ‘For instance, the Earth is not exactly at the centre of the deferent, but is a little off-centre.’
    • ‘This effect was also, as the experts agreed, exaggerated by the fact that the sensors of the Stal system were set off-centre in some of the holds.’
    • ‘One off-centre bay window extends upwards, bringing views of the sky in addition to the broad sweep of the hills.’
    • ‘Lombardy's centres of viticulture are off-centre geographically - in the far north, in the far south, and in the far east - all well off the region's main axis of communication.’
    • ‘A later invention, the unicycle with an off-centre hub, would bring people out into the corridors to watch him as he rode it, bobbing up and down like a duck.’
    • ‘Mr. Butler liked everything quite off-centre and most ballet companies have to be on-centre for their particular kind of work.’
    • ‘In the picture of a lustre bowl with green peas, the main items are off-centre, giving a diagonal thrust to the composition.’
    • ‘With modern auto-focus cameras the most obvious focussing problem is where the subject is off-centre.’
    • ‘In the second shot, Mthethwa moves his human subject off-centre.’
    • ‘There is something so beautiful about it, the treatment of paint depicting the velvety skin, the delicious red/orange tones, and the placement - off-centre.’
    • ‘Naturally, there is a fairly large screen, plus Canon's nine-point auto-focusing system, which rarely misses an off-centre subject.’
    • ‘Its orientation, however, was curious, running diagonally across the ditch extension towards a position off-centre of the mound.’
    • ‘People opt for one fairly lush plant and place it off-centre on their mantel, rather than filling a whole shelf with plants.’
    • ‘In the Skara Brae object, you can see how cunningly the top and base ridges are off-centre, allowing it initially to be held vertically.’
    • ‘The composition of the figures is placed off-centre and the zigzagging lines of the cafe tables convey their situation in space.’
    • ‘He posed the dancers in strange positions and put them off-center or cut off from the frame.’
    zany, madcap, offbeat, quirky, outlandish, eccentric, idiosyncratic, surreal, ridiculous, nonsensical, crazy, absurd, insane, far out, fantastic, bizarre, peculiar, weird, odd, strange, cranky, freakish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Unconventional or unusual.
      ‘an off-centre comedy sketch show’
      • ‘That is why, in our respectful submission, the approach taken in point of principle is off centre.’
      • ‘Yet her chief prescription seems oddly off centre.’
      • ‘Talk famously steals the riff from Kraftwerk's Computer Love and hearkens in tone to the quirky off centre Whisper.’
      • ‘Despite the fine leads, the TV series failed to match the off-centre appeal of the movie.’
      • ‘Not just cute and beguiling, Pilkington's sculptures are slightly off-centre being both disarming and disconcerting.’
      • ‘Harry paints some great pictures: just real enough to be believable, but just off-centre enough to be funny.’
      • ‘The band play a noisy, off centre indie rock with shades of PJ Harvey.’
      • ‘The dry, sharp wit of Enid's constant observations are matched by the deadpan outlandishness of the parade of off-centre characters she comes into contact with, which inspire them.’
      • ‘In contrast to this, they attempt to supplement work on the central institutions of China by presenting an off-centre view.’
      • ‘For me, already having an interest in the bizarre and anything off-centre, I liked Dada.’
      • ‘From the off-centre title metaphor to the beautifully layered arrangement, this is no mere pastiche.’
      • ‘In spite of all this, having the chance to watch a fine ensemble cast play such an array of off-centre characters is worth the price of admission alone.’
      • ‘Rhodes has spoken of how her work has its parallels in her own history of being culturally off-centre.’
      • ‘Soren Alberto Gauger, now living in Krakow, Poland, writes an off-centre, twisting narrative, sparkled with elaborate prose in "The Unusual Narrative of the Odessa Conference."’
      • ‘There's lots of movement that's upside down, off centre, racy.’

Pronunciation

off-centre

/ɒfˈsɛntə/