Definition of of an age in English:

of an age

phrase

  • 1Old enough to be able or expected to do something.

    ‘the sons are of an age to marry’
    • ‘You'd probably been up late on the phone with them, despite being of an age where should know better, talking all night like high school kids with their first crush.’
    • ‘She was not of an age to have helped or even to have supported the Nazis, and therefore (if justice requires that each should get his desert) it was unjust that she should bear the guilty burden of the past.’
    • ‘They are now of an age that exceeds the average life expectancy in the countries where they live.’
    • ‘He said some members of staff may be of an age where they want to consider voluntary retirement, while others would be re-deployed and High Lawn would also consider how many extra staff will be needed.’
    • ‘Usually I like getting a new phone - I'm of an age where there's still some nagging sense of wonder that I can pick out my own phone in the first place.’
    • ‘My teenage daughters get the bus all the time, but I know that when they are of an age when they can drive, they will start to use the car because it's cheaper.’
    • ‘Zoe is glad when they marry; she's of an age where she's dying to flee the family home but wants to see her mother settled first.’
    • ‘Leaving aside that they are not yet of an age considered able to make mature decisions, many are driven into conflict by pressures beyond their control, usually economic in nature.’
    • ‘And so I was of an age where I wasn't being hired as an actress.’
    • ‘The VEC was starting in 2001 with the first of the retirees- ‘none of whom looked to be of an age when they should retire’ -.’
    • ‘Two of the sons are now 18 and 17 years old, certainly of an age when they could be rounded up.’
    • ‘Indeed, those parents of an age to have had to put up with the abuse, ranting, demonstrating, and phony political idealism of the sixties will at last be getting some kind of return from their children.’
    • ‘Memorandum to the elderly (and by elderly I mean anyone who is of an age to fit in to the generational demographic known as ‘baby boomer’, or older).’
    • ‘One afternoon when we were eight or nine, still of an age when curiosity can over-ride kindness, my friend John McGuinness and I spent longer than we should have done proving that his dog was word-deaf.’
    • ‘Mary Boyd Higgens is the main person behind it, though she must be very advanced in years now, as she was alive and of an age advanced enough to be appointed trustee when Reich died in '57.’
    • ‘For the Professor, there was a terrible urgency to the rallies, since he was of an age where he could have been forced into uniform and sent off to fight, and this made the chanting and the cheering for Dr. Jim's oratory so much more passionate.’
    • ‘Of the 6 blokes I am 1 of only 2 who is not married and is still of an age where getting blind drunk and climbing on top of bus shelters is ‘a plan’.’
    • ‘More intensive training and supervision is needed to prevent mentors from inadvertently role modeling RA behaviors, since they are still of an age where this dynamic can be an issue.’
    • ‘The main problem is that we're dealing with people who are largely of an age when they're anti-establishment and don't like being told what to do.’
    • ‘I have to add that there is a very large decline in the attendance of dances held in the village hall every Monday night and run by an excellent team of teachers, all because those attending now are of an age when they cannot continue to attend.’
  • 2(of two or more people or things) of a similar age.

    ‘the children all seemed of an age’
    • ‘Though Kaumai was 'Aukele's nephew they were nearly of an age and surfed and boxed together.’
    • ‘Bryan McFadden, of an age with me, has released a song called Irish Son.’
    • ‘A well written story and something we, as we are of an age can understand where others cannot.’
    • ‘The cousins were almost of an age, of much the same stature; but Olga had a pallid tint, tawny hair, and bluish eyes, whilst Irene's was a warm complexion, her hair of dark-brown, and her eyes of hazel.’
    • ‘From my mid-30’s to mid-40’s, there were those who told me I looked ‘just like Reba McEntire’. We are of an age, and, at the time, I found it quite annoying.’