Definition of October in English:

October

noun

  • The tenth month of the year, in the northern hemisphere usually considered the second month of autumn.

    ‘the project started in October’
    ‘one of the wettest Octobers on record’
    • ‘During the last two Octobers we had seven flight Class A mishaps and killed eight Airmen in ground accidents.’
    • ‘City have failed to win in three games since Todd was named October manager of the month.’
    • ‘Fresh or canned, they can help keep you healthy for many Octobers to come.’
    • ‘To that end the council will hold a ballot of tenants in September or October this year.’
    • ‘By October the next year all salvage was abandoned and she became a total loss.’
    • ‘Mild Septembers, kind Octobers - they build up this strange meteorological goodwill that seeks you through the bleakest February.’
    • ‘The centre would open from April to October each year and by appointment at other times.’
    • ‘In October a reader asked if I could think of a way of earning some money at home.’
    • ‘They've completely lost my December, shifted my November and given me two Octobers instead.’
    • ‘In October a general amnesty was declared for all who had taken up arms against the Republic.’
    • ‘But I do wonder what happened to the kids I met a few Octobers ago.’
    • ‘Two of his first four wins came against the Yankees, the team that knocked the Mariners out of the playoffs in each of the past two Octobers.’
    • ‘It turned out to be the only ring Bouton won, because New York fell to the Dodgers and Cardinals, respectively, the next two Octobers.’
    • ‘A decision on the hospital is due to be taken by the trust at its October meeting.’
    • ‘In October 2002 Evans pounced on the youngster as he went to the shops to buy a pint of milk.’
    • ‘By October the Americans had heard of the project and asked for the details and an engine.’
    • ‘Last October the company decided they wanted to close the scheme to new entrants.’
    • ‘By October she was back to the No.1 spot in the rankings and her career was back on track.’
    • ‘It was a cold October night and the wind was howling and it had started to spit with rain.’
    • ‘Some Octobers have been particularly rough sledding for the stock market.’

Origin

Late Old English, from Latin, from octo ‘eight’ (being originally the eighth month of the Roman year).

Pronunciation

October

/ɒkˈtəʊbə/