Definition of obstruction in English:

obstruction

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The action of obstructing or the state of being obstructed.

    ‘walkers could proceed with the minimum of obstruction’
    • ‘For the administration and its conservative allies, the United Nations represents embarrassment and obstruction.’
    • ‘That's why it's so troubling today to see Clark join in the same self-fulfilling wave of determined pessimism and obstruction he battled four years ago.’
    • ‘But what's interesting to me is that we're talking about obstruction, and that is the issue that some people have just never learned a lesson about.’
    • ‘He is tired of delays and apparently endless obstruction from planners, he said this week.’
    • ‘I suspect his obstruction of Johnson's appointment due to the abortive toxics study is related more to political posturing than to anyone's health or safety.’
    • ‘If the restaurant continues to defy the order, the mayor may be held responsible, and any action causing further delay or obstruction could be punishable by both fines and imprisonment.’
    • ‘Alimentary canal obstruction canal obstruction should not be always assumed to be caused by faecal matter a this can be a tumour.’
    • ‘By elevating these panels, we were able to ensure a true south orientation, free of obstruction, while at the same time providing some shade for the rooftop patio.’
    • ‘This official obstruction would seem to be a clear indication that the president is worried about embarrassing details emerging that could threaten his re-election.’
    • ‘The integrity of Congress has been called into question by his obstruction and tampering and interference with an investigation.’
    • ‘What is unhealthy is the growing habit of obstruction, delay and occasional flat refusal to co-operate.’
    • ‘Foreign aid does not challenge Wilsonian principles; it involves cooperation, or at least a lack of obstruction, from foreign governments.’
    • ‘Footpath obstruction is one of the most common complaints received by council.’
    • ‘Remember, snoring means obstructed breathing, and obstruction can be serious.’
    • ‘The ultimate obstruction to carrying out our parliamentary duties is something that prevents us from exercising free speech.’
    • ‘Document all instances of denied access, lack of cooperation, or other obstruction to carrying out your mission.’
    • ‘The local population might have that knowledge because we don't know of any obstruction being removed.’
    • ‘Rather than substantive debate, political leaders are still adhering to a failed strategy of spite, obstruction, and conspiracy theories.’
    • ‘War reporters, working under threats to their safety and obstruction from military controllers, find their newsdesks demanding copy when they have few new facts to report.’
    1. 1.1[count noun]A thing that impedes or prevents passage or progress; an obstacle or blockage.
      ‘the tractor hit an obstruction’
      • ‘The complete route is along public rights of way, plus three deviations required by obstructions.’
      • ‘Apart from a few rocks obscured in shadow and a waist high metal guard rail, the area was clear of any obstructions.’
      • ‘Because there had been no trains on the line for two days because of Christmas he was checking for fallen trees or other obstructions.’
      • ‘Nosehill Park is a large, open space and has absolutely no obstructions.’
      • ‘Avoid blocks which will be overshadowed in winter by obstructions north of the house site.’
      • ‘A canoeist who can read a river and avoid underwater obstructions is a priceless companion on any river trip.’
      • ‘Councillor Pickup condemned the mobile takeaway on safety grounds, saying larger vehicles caused obstructions.’
      • ‘The nylon line that anglers use frequently breaks when hooks become snagged on underwater obstructions or bankside vegetation.’
      • ‘It is asking the tidy towns members to ensure that street furniture does not cause any obstructions for people with disabilities.’
      • ‘Check for depth and obstructions before diving, then go in feet first for the initial try.’
      • ‘The key attraction of high-clearance 4x4 cars in the city is their ability to deal with these obstructions.’
      • ‘The stairwell was exhausting, yet he encountered no fall away steps and no large obstructions as he made his way down.’
      • ‘Check that the attic space is clear of obstructions above where you wish to locate the skylight.’
      • ‘A survey was being carried out round the village, and some obstructions had been found in the sewer from the top of Armscote Road.’
      • ‘The floor of the corridor was not level: beams and other obstructions poked through the walls at interesting heights.’
      • ‘The first flood was caused by a combination of obstructions in the gutter and the absence of any overflow to deal with excess water not taken away by obstructed drains.’
      • ‘They cleared about 2,400 obstructions, most of them mined, and removed the charges from scores of Beetle tanks.’
      • ‘Emergency exits must be made of fireproof materials and must be clear of any obstructions, and must be illuminated at all times.’
      • ‘The tank's 115-mm main armament couldn't get low enough to blast the obstructions.’
      • ‘There are no obstructions along the coast (just an oil rig near Rioconcha).’
    2. 1.2(in various sports) the action of unlawfully obstructing a player in the opposing team.
      • ‘After four minutes Barnhall were awarded a penalty when a Naas player was penalised for obstruction.’
      • ‘The Oilers are a free-wheeling, offense-oriented team that will benefit greatly from the crackdown on obstruction.’
      • ‘Melvin, too, was informed that the only player guilty of obstruction was Lopez.’
      • ‘It's true that less obstruction helps all players and speeds up the game.’
      • ‘To combat the obstruction and generate scoring chances, teams must attack with speed and fight it out.’
    3. 1.3Medicine
      Blockage of a bodily passage, especially the gut.
      ‘they presented with severe intestinal obstruction’
      • ‘A thorough examination of the head and neck should be performed to look for obstruction, inflammation and infection.’
      • ‘Intestinal strictures and bowel obstruction may develop in patients with refractory sprue or celiac disease that has been untreated over a long period.’
      • ‘An infectious cause should be suspected in children with signs and symptoms of airway obstruction accompanied by a prodromal illness or fever.’
      • ‘One hypothesis about the cause of sudden infant death syndrome is upper airway obstruction during sleep.’
      • ‘Lacrimal duct obstruction may result from swelling of the lining of the narrow tear passage, obstruction by mucus, pus or cellular debris.’
    4. 1.4Law
      The action of impeding the movement of traffic on a highway.
      ‘they were held for obstruction and other public order offences’
      • ‘The dictionary meaning of gridlock is obstruction of traffic caused by queues of vehicles forming across a junction and causing further queues to form in the intersecting streets.’
      • ‘On Thursday five men who dressed as Father Christmas in Liverpool city centre in a protest over fathers' rights were charged with highway obstruction.’
      • ‘The council decided this caused obstruction to traffic and painted yellow lines down both sides.’
      • ‘Meetings and marches are subject to the laws prohibiting obstruction of the highway, public nuisance, and trespass, and to local authority by-laws.’
      • ‘Traffic incidents included 15 motor accidents, 30 cases of traffic obstruction and 16 illegally parked cars.’
    5. 1.5Law
      The action of deliberately hindering the police in their duties.
      ‘he was charged with obstruction of a police officer in the execution of his duty’
      • ‘The refusal of a citizen to identify himself under such circumstances causes a major inconvenience and obstruction to the police in carrying out their proper duties.’
      • ‘Arrests on mischief, obstruction of police and possession of prohibited or restricted weapons charges were made, said Sergeant Jim Black of Toronto Police.’
      • ‘After being charged with the thefts and obstruction, police released him on bail to appear before magistrates the following week but he failed to turn up.’
      • ‘The adults, who had been staying in the motel room, were charged with cruelty to children, public indecency and obstruction of police and were taken to a psychiatric ward.’
      • ‘Each of the original 22 defendants were charged with break and enter, being unlawfully in a dwelling house, three counts of mischief, and obstruction of police.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin obstructio(n-), from the verb obstruere (see obstruct).

Pronunciation:

obstruction

/əbˈstrʌkʃ(ə)n/