Definition of novice in English:

novice

noun

  • 1A person new to and inexperienced in a job or situation.

    ‘he was a complete novice in foreign affairs’
    • ‘I don't see why it shouldn't become as popular as snowboarding - it attracts skiers, skaters and complete novices.’
    • ‘None of us had been skating in ages, and one was a complete novice.’
    • ‘Now 68, he's taught more than 4,000 students, from novice to expert.’
    • ‘The suggestions that follow below offer basic searching suggestions for Internet novices.’
    • ‘In fact, it can help even novices refine a search.’
    • ‘If you are a complete novice I wouldn't worry about spending much time here.’
    • ‘The system used is not particularly user friendly for novices or inexperienced staff: this could be improved with more modern software facilities.’
    • ‘Yes, sowing is fiddly, to a degree that can terrify novice gardeners.’
    • ‘Louise, a fellow novice, and I are in excited anticipation.’
    • ‘The book will probably be more attractive to Durkheim specialists and graduate students than to novices in the field.’
    • ‘Success also came for Phil Stanley who won the novice sculls in confident style.’
    • ‘The beginning of Serious Poker is aimed at relative novices.’
    • ‘Professional photographers Jan Checker and Sally Vigilante were on hand to teach the photography novices some useful skills.’
    • ‘A political novice, Simpson all but wiped out Trimble's personal majority of 15,000 votes.’
    • ‘He ended up losing to Michael Burgess, a medical doctor and political novice.’
    • ‘For novice users and people with cognitive difficulties, navigation must be intuitive and logical.’
    • ‘The document format provided to him was sufficient to accommodate even a novice computer user.’
    • ‘While the LSO no longer directs the pilot down, he is constantly giving advice if required and can be a calming voice for the inexperienced novice.’
    • ‘This annual sporting event takes place on Sunday, May 1 when keen runners and complete novices get together for a five-mile race, a one-mile adult run and a one-mile children's event.’
    • ‘Persistent weeds are a common problem for both the novice gardener and the professional farmer.’
    beginner, learner, inexperienced person, neophyte, newcomer, new member, new recruit, raw recruit, new boy, new girl, initiate, tyro, fledgling
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    1. 1.1 An animal, especially a racehorse, that has not yet won a major prize or reached a sufficient level of performance to qualify for important events.
      ‘last season as a novice he won three races’
      as modifier ‘the novice hurdles’
      • ‘I may not have been a winner but at least I had completed the novice hurdle.’
      • ‘Culloty sustained the injury when falling from Only Vintage at the fourth flight in a novices' hurdle at the same course on Tuesday.’
      • ‘And there was some consolation for the connections of Limestone Lad when Solerina won the novice hurdle.’
      • ‘Only seven, he was one of the better novice chasers last season but there is hopefully a lot more improvement to come.’
      • ‘He ended last season by winning the Scottish Champion Hurdle, then injured himself in his first novice chase.’
      • ‘It was only fitting that there should be a female winner on Ladies Day and trainer Venetia Williams obliged when Limerick Boy won the novices' hurdle handicap.’
      • ‘A useful novice chaser two seasons ago, the Ferdy Murphy-trained gelding showed all of his old sparkle as he took the spoils.’
      • ‘He only went down by half a length in a seven-furlong novice event and may well have won had he known more about the racing game.’
      • ‘But that was before the Queen's horse, Shining Strand, won a novice hurdle race at Wetherby.’
      • ‘There is nothing to stop novices running in normal hurdles or chases.’
      • ‘Today's Royal Bond Hurdle will go a long way towards sorting out the pecking order of the Cheltenham-bound novices and two further pieces in the jigsaw should be provided at Navan next month.’
      • ‘He was a decent novice hurdler, who took to fences really well, initially.’
      • ‘Cornish Rebel made a successful start to his chasing career with victory in a novice chase at Lingfield.’
      • ‘Captain Christy, ridden by Bobby Beasley, remains the last novice to have won chasing's blue riband event.’
      • ‘Watch for an Irish outsider in the supreme novice hurdle and an Irish winner of the Coral Cup.’
      • ‘Karanja has what it takes to make a high-class novice over hurdles this season and, with Andrew Thornton in the saddle, he can begin this new phase of his career on a high note.’
      • ‘Lord Sam, one of last season's top novices, made several jumping errors before finally dumping jockey Jim Culloty at a fence on the back straight.’
      • ‘The gelding's new trainer may try to capitalise on Captain Corelli's novice hurdle status before reverting to chases.’
      • ‘Apparently the horse jumped particularly well and his trainer expects him to make a big impression in novice chases.’
  • 2A person who has entered a religious order and is under probation, before taking vows.

    • ‘Whether novice monks will result from that I don't really know.’
    • ‘Both were described in the future tense since both took place in the context of the Eucharist, of which the novice had no direct experience.’
    • ‘He was an officer in the Irish Guards before becoming a novice monk in the Benedictine Order in 1955.’
    • ‘Similarly, a young novice entered St. Martin's cell and was puzzled not to find him there.’
    • ‘The deportment of Buddhist monks and novices is governed by many exacting rules, and phenomenological accounts of this celibate, contemplative way of life are available in a number of texts.’
    • ‘Still very active at sixty years old, she was sent to the motherhouse to oversee the novices ' manual work.’
    • ‘At present an average 220 monks and novices live within the temple compound.’
    • ‘A friend who is a novice in an Episcopal religious order recently told me that she has no taste now for books of contemporary spirituality.’
    • ‘So there are hundreds or even thousands of postulants, novices, seminarians, active priests, and retired priests who live, work, or hang out at American seminaries.’
    • ‘In ten short years, several historic monasteries and convents have been restored to the Orthodox church and have welcomed hundreds of young novices.’
    • ‘Is there a potential that there will be some novice monks among them?’
    • ‘The area under claim amounted to a sacred precinct as most of the acreage was associated with initiation rites, the storage of sacred objects, and the activities of religious tutors and novices.’
    • ‘How many monks and nuns, or novices, would you say?’
    • ‘Galileo had a mixed education, starting at a monastery school in Vallombrosa where he entered the order as a novice, against the wishes of his father.’
    • ‘These words from Jeremiah were engraved on a plaque on our dormitory wall when I was a novice with Mother Teresa in Calcutta.’
    • ‘One confessor ordered Veronica Giuliani to kneel while a novice of the order kicked her in the mouth.’
    • ‘Maana's wife went to the temple to give alms daily, serving breakfasts and lunches to her son, other novices and monks, until her son was disrobed.’
    • ‘The opening programme has a brief section in which the novices question a monk on celibacy but, at the risk of the sin of prurience, I wanted to know more about the dynamics of living in a community of men.’
    • ‘His dilemma is crystallised by his " irregular fondness " for two fellow novices.’
    • ‘He joined the monastic order as a novice, and studied the Hua-yen ching with Chih-yen.’
    novitiate, postulant, proselyte, catechumen, neophyte
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Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from late Latin novicius, from novus ‘new’.

Pronunciation

novice

/ˈnɒvɪs/