Definition of nouvelle vague in English:

nouvelle vague

noun

  • [mass noun] A grouping of French film directors in the late 1950s and 1960s who reacted against established French cinema and sought to make more individualistic and stylistically innovative films. Exponents included Claude Chabrol, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, and François Truffaut.

    • ‘Woo was profoundly influenced by Hollywood classics, French nouvelle vague and politically engaged Japanese cinema.’
    • ‘Godard's existentialist classic also stars poster boy of the nouvelle vague Jean-Pierre Léaud as Goya's idle boyfriend.’
    • ‘Though spiced with a few new-school sequences of digital editing, Charlie is an overwhelming homage to the French nouvelle vague.’
    • ‘In the absence of nouvelle vague mystique, and because he's through pushing films to their aesthetic limits, Chabrol's later films aren't as exhilarating as his early ones.’
    • ‘That Chabrol's Les Bonnes Femmes, one of the landmarks of the nouvelle vague, never received an official release in the United States is surprising considering the film's many sensational elements.’
    • ‘I'm talking about films in the realist tradition: news reels, documentaries, home movies, nouvelle vague, etc.’
    • ‘Constituting cinema as a defined specificity, the nouvelle vague conferred upon the cinematic materials what Bakhtin has called a ‘double orientation.’’
    • ‘But I was seduced by the nouvelle vague, because it was really reinventing everything.’
    • ‘In a way, the depiction of intimacy with a twist of irony is a nouvelle vague device that goes back to À bout de souffle.’
    • ‘In France, many of the techniques of cinéma verité were incorporated into commercial feature films by the likes of Godard and Truffaut, leading directors of the nouvelle vague.’
    • ‘In 1965, when Loach made this ‘Wednesday Play’ for the BBC, he was, like most young people interested in film, under the influence of the nouvelle vague, the French new wave.’
    • ‘They became fascinated, almost to obsession, by nouvelle vague films from France like Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless.’
    • ‘I had to defend, you know, a lot of nouvelle vague films, and then Antonioni, and certain Hollywood directors, like, say, Aldrich.’
    • ‘By taking the camera to the streets and showing the faces and lives of ordinary people, the neorealists and the directors of the nouvelle vague had fomented a true ethical and aesthetic revolution in films.’
    • ‘The DVD, digitally manipulated and looped, scans a cobbled-together world of iconic monuments and empty, eerie vistas that are at once familiar and not, a futuristic film in 1960s nouvelle vague mode.’
    • ‘The Dogme anarchists have eclipsed the nouvelle vague as a philosophy for the modern filmmaker.’
    • ‘Expanding upon this unlikely image, Julie Perron constructs an engaging film about the visit of French nouvelle vague icon/iconoclast, Jean-Luc Godard, to a small town in Quebec.’
    • ‘Think back to the nouvelle vague, if you will, and what they did with the underappreciated gems of Hollywood cinema.’
    • ‘Like most leftist movements, neorealism was co-opted by intellectuals, at least in France, where it transformed into French nouvelle vague, popularly known as ‘New Wave.’’
    • ‘The film depicted is essentially a Hollywood picture with a French accent, with all the potential logistical nightmares attendant on that style of shooting, which were so artfully avoided by the early nouvelle vague efforts.’

Origin

French, literally new wave.

Pronunciation:

nouvelle vague

/nuːˌvɛl ˈvɑːɡ//French nuvɛl vaɡ/