Definition of nought in English:

nought

noun

British
  • The digit 0.

    • ‘Inevitably most of the best bits get picked up by the handful of adjacent shopkeepers who can add three noughts to the local price - and get it.’
    • ‘It is far from the first time a country has dispensed with excess noughts - some 50 countries have done so since Germany in 1923.’
    • ‘‘Er, no, an eight-figure sum,’ said Gerald Krasner, trying to keep a grip on all the noughts.’
    • ‘I thought it was €30,000 I had won but there was a couple of more noughts!’
    • ‘It's worth spelling that out in noughts - $7,000,000, 000,000-to get the true picture.’
    • ‘Multiply population by wealth and compare the two countries - you will have to get rid of some of the noughts or your calculator will overload.’
    • ‘The bill from the hotel came to 1644 Turkish lira followed by six noughts.’
    • ‘My father worked there for 40 years, I've been a customer for almost another 40, and I still owe it a large number with several noughts on the end.’
    • ‘Just to see a ‘one’ with those six noughts next to it is hard to believe.’
    • ‘The more precise figure is a big number with a lot of noughts: £5,842, 700,000,000!’
    • ‘In pre-euro days, Italians had little confidence in the lira - and no wonder, with all those absurd noughts that required a focusing of the eyes on the dinner bill.’
    • ‘When the money came through, I went to the cash machine, pressed that little button and saw all the noughts come up at the end.’
    • ‘It is the number one followed by 12 noughts; a trillion pounds is roughly equivalent to the combined gross domestic product of the world's 155 least wealthy nations.’
    • ‘I once had to pay a tax bill with a serious number of noughts on it.’
    • ‘The numbers are moving lightning fast, but are very simple: made up of noughts and ones.’
    • ‘Smailes added: ‘It will add two or three noughts to the value of a painting.’’
    • ‘From July 1 every 10,000 of the old lei will be exchanged for one new leu, knocking four noughts off the currency.’
    • ‘If there's something that sets my tolerance barometer to nought it's people suggesting presents for people they don't know.’
    • ‘Sadly, when some ends of the sporting market do business with seven noughts permanently attached, it is hard to admit failure.’
    • ‘It's dangerous to make moral judgments on the Leeds players just because they have more noughts than us on the end of their salaries.’
    nil, zero, 0
    View synonyms

pronoun

  • variant spelling of naught
    • ‘Yet the courts of the land counted as nought this wondrous devotion.’
    • ‘The driver tried to swerve out of he way but it was for nought: they hit the other vehicle head on and died in a blaze of fire.’
    • ‘Their good work was set at nought a minute later when Kildare lost the ball in midfield and senior midfielder Martin McGrath raced through to stick the ball in the net four minutes from the interval.’
    • ‘It is home where the criminal attitude of the children towards women could be prevented and thus the crimes against women in the future could be brought to nought.’
    • ‘Most of the Crustacean's money-making schemes came to nought.’
    • ‘In Frost at Midnight, Coleridge, with his young son at his side, muses on his own childhood in London, where he ‘saw nought lovely but the sky and stars’.’
    • ‘We must not believe that the triumph of experimental science reduced to nought the dreams and ideals of the alchemist.’
    • ‘The existence of a parallel common law right, whereby individual householders who suffer sewer flooding may themselves bring court proceedings when no enforcement order has been made, would set at nought the statutory scheme.’
    • ‘But the fact the Cowboys had never beaten the Broncos counted for nought last weekend.’
    • ‘But if I had pride in my learning, I had more in my desire not to remain where there was nought for me but the fading memory of my father's name.’
    • ‘Still, there was nought he could do, other than fight and survive.’
    • ‘One more error and all the good work she had done on Friday would be for nought.’
    • ‘Roudaire's dream came to nought but a few years later, an engineer from Montpellier, Alphonse Duponchel, argued that a railway should be driven across the Sahara linking French colonies in North and West Africa.’
    • ‘But if the proposition is that State amendment rules can displace and effectively set at nought the Commonwealth limitation, then we obviously would have difficulty and reject that proposition.’
    nothing, nothing at all, naught
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Pronunciation

nought

/nɔːt/