Definition of nor in English:

nor

Pronunciation /nɔː//nə/

conjunction & adverb

  • 1Used before the second or further of two or more alternatives (the first being introduced by a negative such as ‘neither’ or ‘not’) to indicate that they are each untrue or each do not happen.

    ‘they were neither cheap nor convenient’
    ‘the sheets were never washed, nor the towels, nor his shirts’
    • ‘Again, neither the affirmative nor the negative answer is really satisfactory.’
    • ‘He was carrying neither a towel nor a change of clothing, so he did not climb down with her.’
    • ‘On second thoughts, neither the apartment owner nor I had any reason to be unhappy.’
    • ‘However, humans and animals should not drink directly from the river nor enter the water.’
    • ‘English in Nepal is unique in that it was introduced neither by colonization nor by missionaries.’
    • ‘George said the building was not owned by the government nor the police force.’
    • ‘Neither trade nor industry could offer a major alternative source of employment.’
    • ‘It had neither had the space nor facilities to become a secondary school.’
    • ‘He explains that it's neither easy nor cheap to cast talented actors for just a small number of scenes.’
    • ‘This description is neither entirely accurate nor indicative of the Jewish legend.’
    • ‘They still judge a person's physical appearance which is neither safe nor reliable.’
    • ‘Neither the donor nor the hospital had any indication that he carried a hereditary disorder.’
    • ‘If this is not done, neither leopards, nor humans will have much to look forward to in the days ahead.’
    • ‘Looking at the market's current valuation, it appears neither too expensive nor too cheap.’
    • ‘Neither the directors nor the viewers are concerned about the quality of the programmes.’
    • ‘The Zoology Department where it is housed has neither money nor expertise to maintain it.’
    • ‘The author has already said that the Half Blood Prince is neither Harry nor Voldemort.’
    • ‘The third condition is used in such a way that it entails neither the second condition nor the first.’
    • ‘They indicated that they could neither speak nor hear but that they wanted him to sign the books of matches they had brought.’
    • ‘Neither taste nor strength have been compromised in producing this alternative.’
    1. 1.1
      ‘nor God nor demon can undo the done’
      literary term for neither
  • 2Used to introduce a further negative statement.

    ‘‘I don't see how.’ ‘Nor do I.’’
    • ‘I did not threaten him or the Second Defendant nor did I become verbally abusive towards them at any time.’
    • ‘Bermuda shorts are no longer sniggered at, nor are loud, multi-coloured shirts.’
    • ‘Rental of ski equipment, and the lessons, were not cheap but nor were they exorbitant.’
    • ‘There was no trace of cancer, nor was there any indication that she had ever had any!’
    • ‘I had no recollection of my journey to this place nor indication of the time it took to get here.’
    • ‘Our friends may not be the best indicators, nor a record's position in the charts.’
    • ‘The irony is that Robben was not allowed to complete the match, nor even take much part in the second half.’
    • ‘Just checked, and it doesn't do alternative languages, nor does it even run to subtitles.’
    • ‘She did not return to her GP for a second visit, nor was she taken into hospital on October 26.’
    • ‘An art gallery is not wanted, nor is it a viable financial alternative for the council.’
    • ‘The indications as stated are that this is not being achieved nor indeed will it be in the medium term at any rate.’
    • ‘This is not an article to point blame at anyone, nor is this article being used to criticize my country.’
    • ‘The man did not look at her, nor did he give any indication that he was even listening.’
    • ‘Take it from one who knows: our second First Minister was not corrupt, nor was he stupid.’
    • ‘At present there is no queuing system, nor indication of the waiting time to be seen.’
    • ‘There is no shortage of work for Lalonde, nor does he expect one any time soon.’
    • ‘I just cannot imagine him saying anything as crass as the paper implied, nor is it likely that he would have lied about it.’
    • ‘I have no qualms about my devotion to my work, nor have I suffered a second's guilt.’
    • ‘You cannot say that they are totally positive nor can you say that they are totally negative.’
    • ‘He did not speak, nor give any indication that he was conscious of their presence.’
  • 3archaic, dialect conjunction or preposition Than.

    ‘she thinks she knows better nor me’

Origin

Middle English: contraction of Old English nother ‘neither’.

Pronunciation

nor

/nɔː//nə/