Main definitions of nip in English

: nip1nip2Nip3

nip1

verb

  • 1with object Bite or pinch sharply.

    ‘one of the dogs nipped him on the leg’
    no object ‘his teeth nipped at her ear’
    • ‘The hyenas nipped at his bandaged arm, trying to rile him up.’
    • ‘I'd arrange for visitors over that weekend, and if he nipped at a visitor, I would make sure he understood I was very displeased.’
    • ‘He nipped gently at my ear, then took off, vanishing into the starlit sky.’
    • ‘The dogs nipped at her heels, the silver dusk rose up as her feet sped on.’
    • ‘His pet struggled in his grasp, nipping angrily at fingers.’
    • ‘I bared my teeth and nipped at his finger.’
    • ‘I picked Fidget up and he nipped at me but I ignored that.’
    • ‘Thundering Glory seemed to know what was wrong, because he nickered and nipped at the bottom of my shirt.’
    • ‘As I moved within her, Mina nipped at my ear, mewling softly.’
    • ‘They chase off clownfish that don't fit into the hierarchy and many scuba divers tell anecdotes of being nipped at if they venture too close.’
    • ‘They added he is low maintenance, but if he's upset he will hiss or nip at fingers.’
    • ‘A crab had nipped at my toe but it hadn't taken the whole thing off.’
    • ‘Alpha dogs nip subordinates under the chin as corrections.’
    • ‘He saw his rescuer standing just a few feet away from him a small dog nipping at her heels.’
    • ‘My dog recently bit / nipped me, should I be worried about rabies?’
    • ‘My son bites me when he's angry, he nips me when I wake up too slowly - at this point there aren't many times he won't bite me.’
    • ‘The gull waited until she had come close enough, and then nipped at her fingers.’
    • ‘The two enjoyed several awkward moments of guy-ness on opposite sides of the living room, while Shadow nipped at them both.’
    • ‘He nipped playfully at my ear, as he got the last of the blood off of my gleaning coat.’
    bite, nibble, peck, pinch, tweak, squeeze, grip
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of the cold or frost) damage or hurt.
      ‘the vegetable garden, nipped now by frost’
      • ‘She threw off her covers with much protest as the chilly California winter breeze nipped at her skin and tempted her to crawl back into her warm comforters and sleep the day away.’
      • ‘What has happened to Sheila's tree every year is that it has been nipped by a late frost.’
      • ‘Elaine shivered as the winter winds nipped at her nose, hair rising on the back of her neck.’
      • ‘Groaning, I could only squirm as more winds of biting cold nipped at my body.’
      • ‘I want to run into the surf and away again screaming as the waves coldly nip at my ankles.’
      • ‘Winter is here, temperatures are dropping, and whether you like it or not, Jack Frost will soon be nipping not only your nose, but the rest of your body as well!’
      • ‘The bitter wind rustled the leaves and nipped at her fragile bones.’
      • ‘The cold winds were nipping at him badly, but Peter did not care.’
      • ‘Jake quickly crossed the street in front of the small run-down 7-11 on Main Street and ran in before the cold air had the chance to nip at his nose.’
      • ‘It was so cold that the frost nipped at your nose while wrapped in a scarf.’
      • ‘The cold air nipped at my delicate skin, making me shiver.’
      • ‘But they did and because the weather has been mild, Jane hasn't had to worry about new leaves being nipped by late frosts.’
      • ‘Havelock North topped the list with a 6-degree freeze, while Dannevirke was nipped by a 5.2-degree frost.’
      • ‘When the first heavy frost of the fall nips the local golf course I am out there trying to make ski tracks.’
    2. 1.2nip something off Remove something by pinching or squeezing sharply.
      ‘he nipped off a length of wire with the cutters’
      • ‘The one thing to remember is not to eat the head, so the grub is held by that end and the remainder is nipped off.’
      • ‘They'll be powdered over and I won't be able to nip them off as conveniently as now.’
      • ‘We have infestations at different times of things like Spider Crabs and Spider Crabs are very fond of nipping the ends off the arms and sucking the gonads out from inside.’
      • ‘Tree seedlings, wildflowers, and shrubs were nipped off as soon as they germinated.’
      • ‘The patient observer may see it trying to nip feeding arms off unfortunate barnacles.’
      cut off, snip, snip off, trim, clip, prune, hack off, chop off, saw off, lop, lop off, dock, crop, sever, separate, detach, remove, take off
      View synonyms
  • 2British informal no object, with adverbial of direction Go quickly.

    ‘I'm just nipping down to the Post Office’
    • ‘I quickly nip back in my room to put on my sneakers when the Scottish roommate informs me that the girlfriend has locked herself in his room.’
    • ‘I was nipping off to the loo to inject myself during surgery.’
    • ‘And so, sensitive observers were suddenly noticing the ambulances nipping through the traffic, presumably rushing to deal with the latest sighting of SARS.’
    • ‘One can no longer nip into town to pay a two-minute visit to the bank without having to pay a minimum of 70p for the privilege.’
    • ‘What if it has been left there by someone who's nipped to the loo?’
    • ‘He can't nip off to the pub without someone demolishing first his house and then his planet.’
    • ‘So I nipped into the museum and after a quick look round, high tailed out the back door and found a bus.’
    • ‘You might conceivably nip out to the concessions stand, visit the loo and still come back to the same scene.’
    • ‘I had to nip over to the nursery and drop the company car back, but no trains were running, so I had to take a bus.’
    • ‘You might then want to nip quickly outside to see how the people of Leystonstone see the mosaics from various entrances.’
    • ‘However, it lacks one thing - the ability to nip on and off between bus stops.’
    • ‘So, I nipped out to the shops again and bought myself a Dyson.’
    • ‘While Will and the others are buying their first drink, I nip to the loo.’
    • ‘Bo managed to get past the bar without succumbing to nipping quickly through it's heavy wood doors.’
    • ‘I stayed about an hour just enjoying the activity, then nipped back to the car park between showers.’
    • ‘There doesn't seem to be much on TV this evening so I may nip into town and see Millions.’
    • ‘Having rushed around all day, we nipped out for a takeaway, mixed kebab meat, sausage and chips with garlic mayo and it was delicious.’
    • ‘He's just nipped out to the shops with his dad.’
    • ‘As I couldn't see them I decided I would quickly nip to the loo to touch up my make up, try to do something with my hair and… well you know.’
    • ‘At that point Harry Cat decided to make a dash for freedom and nipped between our legs like a little bit of furry lightning.’
    go, rush, dash, dart, hurry, scurry, scamper
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  • 3US informal with object Steal or snatch (something).

    • ‘Ever nipped a spoon or a napkin from a restaurant?’

noun

  • 1A sharp bite or pinch.

    ‘a strong beak which can deliver a serious nip’
    • ‘He gave me a nasty nip to the ear and I leaped away.’
    • ‘Herding the neighborhood kids and giving an occasional light nip to a rear end or ankle might seem like a funny game in the beginning.’
    • ‘His fair hand made a gesture to touch the dog's face but was rewarded by a painful nip from her sharp fangs.’
    • ‘She sighed and looked on dreamily, before receiving a sharp nip on the ear.’
    • ‘Our largest native flying bird can deliver a nasty nip and the males know no fear when it comes to the defence of their mates and nestlings.’
    • ‘Before I walk away I take a quick nip at his ear.’
    • ‘Sora bit his lip as he felt the sharp nip set his nerves a ringing.’
    • ‘He's got me twice now and a young woman who passed me on Sunday afternoon told me that only a fortuitously placed handbag had spared her an embarrassing and painful nip.’
    • ‘I jumped suddenly as I felt a sharp nip given to my shoulder.’
    • ‘Of which one comment stuck in my mind, this was that as soon as a fox was caught above ground, the top dog out of the pack would administer a sharp nip to the foxes neck, killing it outright.’
    • ‘I am also fairly concerned about running into one of these little bastards, who look as if they give a nasty nip.’
    • ‘He continued to suck my throat and after he gave me one last nip on my shoulder, he straightened out.’
    • ‘He remained, wallet intact, unharmed by so much as a single scratch or nip.’
    bite, nibble, peck, pinch, tweak, squeeze, grip
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A feeling of biting cold.
      ‘a keen nip in the air’
      • ‘Your garden - like ours - can weather autumn's nightly nip in the air and can even breeze through those first fleeting frosts.’
      • ‘There is a nip in the air and a chill in the bone.’
      • ‘Right on schedule, there's a bracing nip in the air these days, and the Montreal live-music scene is shaking off its end-of-summer sluggishness.’
      • ‘With winter coming on, a nip of whiskey helps keep you from feeling the nip of the cold.’
      • ‘Winter is round the corner and there is a nip in the morning air.’
      • ‘There seems to be a slight nip in the air.’
      • ‘She came into the barn from the field, her face flush with the nip of the cold.’
      • ‘Sometimes fall is just glimpsed from behind a car window; it's cold and wet, and while the colors are nice the nip in the air feels like a chain around your neck yanking you towards winter.’
      • ‘There's a nip in the air, but, it's nice to have the sun back and no clouds in the sky after a pretty miserable few days’
      • ‘The air was that perfect refreshing nip of cold, just enough to tint the cheeks pink, and the topaz sky was cloudless and cheery, even in the late morning.’
      • ‘A sharpening nip to the wind made me look south, where a familiar pearling of the sky and darkening of sea showed that the ferryman's prophecy was set to come true.’
      • ‘And later still, when I ambled with Faraday around the estates, listening to the sweet tweet of the birds and the occasional joy-rider, there was no nip in the air.’
      • ‘But every morning now there is a sharp nip in the air, and at night you need to wrap up.’
      • ‘She barely noticed the season's first nip of cold on her cheeks as she strode confidently through the dark streets, lit with nothing but the scarce streetlights.’
      • ‘The nip in the air tells us that summer is drawing to a close and autumn is getting ready make its entrance.’
      • ‘Probably the best time to visit is spring or autumn when the sharp nip in the air is still a welcome novelty and makes sight-seeing on foot more pleasant.’
      • ‘Fall arrived almost exactly on cue last week, the temperature suddenly cooling so that New Yorkers awoke the morning after Labour Day to a slight nip in the air, and a distinct sense of seasonal change.’
      • ‘With summer drawn to a close and a definite feeling of that autumn nip in the air, one can't help but miss the lazy, hazy days of July and August.’
      • ‘See how I have swapped from cold white wine to red now that there is a nip in the air.’
      • ‘With a nip in the air and holiday's on the doorstep, customers often like nothing better than warming their hands and their insides with a hot drink.’

Phrases

  • in the nip

    • informal In the nude; naked.

      ‘they were running round in the nip’
      • ‘When he said there's a woman who sometimes walks about in the nip in the flats across the way, Leanne instantly commandeered his set and wouldn't let anybody else get a look in, not for hell or high water.’
      • ‘They're in calendars naked and when they're not photographed sitting on the back of quad bikes in the nip then they're posing around in Gucci and Armani and Hugo Boss.’
      • ‘Hayley admits to Kim that she is attracted to him - catching him in the nip at the Beach House sorted that out - but she's not sure if she's ready to make that step.’
      • ‘If you see a muscle-bound Austrian man wandering around in the nip, assume he knows what he's doing and just run.’
      • ‘It climaxed with two guys standing gyrating on the stage in the nip.’
      • ‘The Killorglin-based Gulliver company was contacted by potential holidaymakers who are interested in discarding their clothes and taking a dip in the nip in places like Rossbeigh, Inch or Ballybunion.’
  • nip something in the bud

    • Suppress or destroy something at an early stage.

      ‘the idea has been nipped in the bud by the local council’
      • ‘Apparently there have even been discussions of this being tapped as a renewable energy source, but those darn lobbyists soon nipped that idea in the bud.’
      • ‘But moves to regulate the market at this stage could have presumably nipped incipient problems in the bud.’
      • ‘Some attempted thefts by insiders were nipped in the bud, others beat the security and accounting systems, but were caught trying to sell the material.’
      • ‘Fortunately, though through no action of yourself, the plot was nipped in the bud.’
      • ‘If customers are to feel confident about patronising those places they need to know that any trouble will be nipped in the bud.’
      • ‘And I predict, unless this ghastly trend is nipped in the bud, big time political consultants will be forced to report that when stuff goes bad, taxpayers actually prefer someone to take responsibility and request forgiveness.’
      • ‘It's about identifying problems early and nipping them in the bud.’
      • ‘I want to nip it in the bud at an early age and make them realise what pain it causes not just the victims but their families as well.’
      • ‘Fear of revealing ideas early was also cited as a cause of delay, as the potential users do not get a chance to nip bad ideas in the bud early in the design phase.’
      • ‘I hope this thing is nipped in the bud and does not happen to any other councillor.’
      curtail, cut short, strangle at birth, check, cut off, thwart, beat, frustrate, curb, stop, halt, arrest, stifle, obstruct, impede, block, squash, quash, subdue, quell, crack down on, stamp out
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: probably of Low German or Dutch origin.

Pronunciation

nip

/nɪp/

Main definitions of nip in English

: nip1nip2Nip3

nip2

noun

  • A small quantity or sip of spirits.

    ‘a nip of brandy’
    • ‘We jovially washed down the meal with a few nips of Irish Cream.’
    • ‘Try a nip of Nelson's Blood, a specially blended spirit.’
    • ‘To finish off the day we each had two small nips of Drambuie.’
    • ‘It gives the LP editor no pleasure to report that staff had taken to sneaking nips of Jameson from the prize and then, as if such larceny were not bad enough, topping up the bottle with water.’
    • ‘What I do miss are the few glasses of red in the evening, the odd pint out in the pub with the lads, or a hot chocolate with a nip of rum in it before bed.’
    • ‘British soldiers campaigning in the Low Countries in the 16th century were so impressed by the effects of a nip of genever as to coin the expression ‘Dutch courage’.’
    • ‘We finished the meal with some of Brian's brewed coffee and a couple of nips of whisky each.’
    • ‘For a squeamish diary writer it was enough to send me to the editor's well-stocked drinks cabinet for a nip of his favourite barley wine.’
    • ‘However I only drank very rarely and as such wasn't used to more than the occasional nip.’
    • ‘But even with the comfort of a fully underwritten share offer, Allan would be forgiven for reaching for a nip of Armenian brandy himself in the next few days.’
    • ‘There, that should make memorable the deeper lesson of the wedding at Cana: Be tolerant of those who take a nip from time to time.’
    • ‘Coax her into splashing just a nip of Bailey's into your coffee (it'll look like cream) or maybe just a sip of Absolut into your Evian bottle.’
    • ‘One young lady advised a nip of Cointreau liqueur just prior to starting as it coated the throat and calmed her nerves.’
    • ‘With every handshake my glass was topped up with a nip of whisky and by 1am I was feeling rather wobbly.’
    • ‘To honor the festival's origins, locals concoct fiery brews, which they carry in flasks for warming nips.’
    • ‘Ray wanted to explain that a quick nip after breakfast and before lunch made the mind-numbing labor of sticking letters in their appropriate boxes go by a little smoother.’
    • ‘Visitors won't be able to fend off the chill with a nip from a flask - you can't drink in public - although hospitality suites serve free alcohol.’
    • ‘The first few nights Mom slipped me half a Vicodin and a nip of Benedictine brandy.’
    • ‘Keith used to get up quite early, long before Jan, and have a couple of cups of tea with a nip of rum in them.’
    • ‘For Heaven's sake, have a nip of whiskey.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Take a sip or sips of spirits.

    ‘the men nipped from the bottle’
    • ‘He had obviously been on the plane from a previous leg, nipping at those little bottles of Jack Daniel's.’

Origin

Late 18th century (originally denoting a half-pint of ale): probably an abbreviation of the rare term nipperkin ‘small measure’; compare with Low German and Dutch nippen ‘to sip’.

Pronunciation

nip

/nɪp/

Main definitions of nip in English

: nip1nip2Nip3

Nip3

noun

offensive, informal
  • A Japanese person.

Origin

1940s: abbreviation of Nipponese.

Pronunciation

Nip

/nɪp/