Definition of newspaper in English:

newspaper

noun

  • 1A printed publication (usually issued daily or weekly) consisting of folded unstapled sheets and containing news, articles, advertisements, and correspondence.

    ‘all the newspapers carried the story’
    as modifier ‘a newspaper article’
    mass noun ‘she left her muddy boots on a piece of newspaper’
    • ‘We should have more proper news in newspapers, or am I asking too much from the daily tabloid press?’
    • ‘Wendy had left newspapers folded to inside pages all over the dining table.’
    • ‘Of these, the first two are genuine and the latter three are being used by the Daily Mail to sell newspapers.’
    • ‘No doubt newspapers and TV news bulletins are also banned in this medieval hamlet.’
    • ‘Just how hard can it be to get a really exciting science story into a daily newspaper?’
    • ‘Most daily newspapers are available online and, for the most part, you can read them for free.’
    • ‘The space in newspapers given to foreign news had similarly declined over roughly the same period.’
    • ‘These daily newspapers were the staple of the lower middle class and much of the working class.’
    • ‘For the first time in at least a decade, those areas wouldn't have their weekly newspaper.’
    • ‘Coutts has already questioned the legality of the design in a column he wrote for a daily newspaper.’
    • ‘An article in a newspaper or professional journal may suggest an issue for research.’
    • ‘The Times newspaper also ran articles about a report of a massacre seven months earlier.’
    • ‘Our newspapers even print sample test papers so our pupils can study round the clock.’
    • ‘Apparently they were not in a position where they had seen the news or newspapers.’
    • ‘A few weeks ago your newspaper reported in an article that my bicycle had been stolen.’
    • ‘The contents were so harrowing that even tabloid newspapers declined to print the full details.’
    • ‘On display in the shop opposite was a blown up article from an international newspaper.’
    • ‘Nor is it a photograph, or one of those images printed in the newspapers after his death.’
    • ‘For the first time newspapers are carrying articles which ask openly about the future of the regime.’
    • ‘Italy is the only country in the world to have three daily newspapers devoted to sport.’
    1. 1.1 The organization responsible for producing a particular newspaper.
      ‘Ms Henry joined the newspaper 10 months ago’
      • ‘The whole corporate structure of the newspapers involved is incredibly complex.’
      • ‘We don't have to be neutral - we are not a public service broadcaster or even a newspaper.’
      • ‘He kept quiet on this for months, and it took a leak to a newspaper to flush him out.’
      • ‘It owns three daily newspapers as well as the main commercial TV and radio stations.’
      • ‘The newspaper is to submit the investigation as evidence for next month's inquiry.’
      • ‘Taylor likes to tell the story about how he once invited newspapers to join him on the Net.’
      • ‘If a newspaper wants to publish photos of our pupils then I will use my own judgement.’
      • ‘You might add that newspapers and broadcasters will need to raise their game, as well.’
      • ‘It is no surprise that the newspaper group they manage is loath to challenge this same system.’
      • ‘The couple have already turned down an offer from a daily newspaper to do it all again and get paid.’
      • ‘It also reminds us of a time when newspapers and periodicals really did wield power.’
      • ‘A responsible newspaper would not reduce this to a cheap campaign to get more readers.’
      • ‘Indeed, some modern newspapers and book publishers could do with harder editors.’
      • ‘Several newspapers produce rankings using a variety of sources for their data.’
      • ‘It has also won a number of awards and plaudits from trade magazines and national newspapers.’
      • ‘Magazines and newspapers have caught on to the idea of celebrity like never before.’
      • ‘The newspaper has been seen to drift for three months at a time when it cannot afford to do so.’
      • ‘The votes have been subjected to several recounts by newspapers and other organizations.’
      • ‘Stories at newspapers go through the hands of different editors before they are printed on paper.’
      • ‘Evans had attracted the headlines when he declared he wanted to buy the Daily Star newspaper.’

Pronunciation

newspaper

/ˈnjuːspeɪpə//ˈnjuːzpeɪpə/