Definition of newly-wed in English:

newly-wed

noun

usually newly-weds
  • A recently married person.

    ‘the newly-weds shared a kiss’
    as modifier ‘a newly-wed couple’
    • ‘A couple of Canadian newly-weds opposite me had driven up here all the way from Tuscany for dinner; by the end of the meal, hubby was so fired up by the experience that he was even sniffing the coffee.’
    • ‘Newspapers splashed pictures of the newly-weds dressed in matching beige outfits across their front pages and national broadcasters led their news bulletins with the wedding.’
    • ‘The newly-weds spent the night in a honeymoon suite above the pub.’
    • ‘The newly-weds who asked guests to make donations to charity instead of buying wedding presents - fly to Mauritius later this week for their honeymoon.’
    • ‘Like many young couples, newly-weds Ingrid and Mark are struggling to get their feet on the first rung of the property ladder.’
    • ‘The newly-weds spent a week in the Stratosphere Tower Hotel - one of the tallest buildings in the city.’
    • ‘These two had been constant companions for two weeks, still newly-weds, recently ripped apart by the ravages of war.’
    • ‘This was the case even when both partners were in full-time employment, and most newly-weds already prioritized the husband's career and his role as provider.’
    • ‘Next morning I ride out with newly-weds Terry and Anne, and our wrangler Dan.’
    • ‘Last year, Married Life, a guide for newly-weds, was published by government-funded organisations and the Church of England to encourage more couples to jump over the broom.’
    • ‘The honeymoon is being spent in Florida and we wish the newly-weds every happiness.’
    • ‘So the British government promised to reunite all such newly-weds, and already hundreds of brides had been transported across the ocean to be greeted by husbands they barely knew.’
    • ‘The Carters were almost just the opposite: a pair of newly-weds who probably could not have children or have decided not to have children of their own.’
    • ‘Mourners and newly-weds could face parking fines under new proposals for Otley town centre.’
    • ‘Due to family commitments, the newly-weds didn't manage a honeymoon but Tom, now 73, and Doreen 75, plan on treating themselves this time around.’
    • ‘The newly-wed couple are wished every happiness and joy in their married lives.’
    • ‘So few newly-weds are buying dining-room suites that they are beginning to clog up furniture showrooms.’
    • ‘The two sets of newly-weds, who live on the same street in Tyersal, Bradford, decided to get married on the same day when they realised they were both planning an August service.’
    • ‘Congratulations and good wishes to the newly-weds.’
    • ‘The newly-weds of the title are a couple of unpleasant people, who have so little in common that their life together is likely to last as long as your memory of this movie.’
    husband and wife, twosome
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

newly-wed