Definition of nester in English:



  • [usually with adjective or noun modifier] A bird that nests in a specified manner or place.

    ‘a scarce nester in Britain’
    See also empty nester
    • ‘Two species are subterranean nesters, namely the Atlantic Puffin (family Alcidae) and Leach's Storm-Petrel (family Procellariidae).’
    • ‘These birds are common nesters at airfields and airports throughout their range.’
    • ‘House wrens are secondary cavity nesters and readily use nest boxes in forests and at forest edges.’
    • ‘Colony nesters, Pink-footed Shearwaters nest only on islands far off the coast of Chile.’
    • ‘European Starlings are cavity nesters, and nests are generally located in natural hollows, old woodpecker holes, birdhouses, or building eaves and crevices.’
    • ‘A late nester, the female Gadwall picks the nest site, which is usually near water and surrounded by dense weeds or grass.’
    • ‘Brandt's Cormorants, like other cormorants, are colonial nesters.’
    • ‘Colonial nesters, young common terns have been ringed in considerable numbers in Norfolk for many years.’
    • ‘Colony nesters, Flesh-footed Shearwaters nest on islands off the coast of Australia and New Zealand.’
    • ‘Western Screech-Owls are secondary cavity nesters, making use of natural cavities, old Pileated Woodpecker or Northern Flicker holes, and nest boxes.’
    • ‘It is also unlikely that the same set of conditions applies to all of the joint nesters, given that they differ greatly in mating systems and critical aspects of their breeding biology.’
    • ‘The hooded warbler is one of the less common nesters in southern New England, but every year I meet a few.’
    • ‘Ground nesters, California Quail usually find a spot under a shrub or brush-pile or next to a log or other cover where they build a shallow depression lined with grasses and leaves.’
    • ‘Not surprisingly the grey wagtail is a scarce nester in Norfolk.’
    • ‘Bluebirds are early nesters, so right now is the time to get your box in place.’
    • ‘Since most alpine and arctic birds are ground nesters, they require some snow-free ground to initiate laying, and thus must be flexible in reproductive timing.’
    • ‘Great Horned Owls are early nesters and begin calling in courtship in early winter.’
    • ‘Like many riparian obligate breeders, they are open-cup nesters that nest in forest understory, and are therefore subject to similar microclimatic factors, as well as predation from a similar suite of predators.’
    • ‘They are cavity nesters that historically nested in tree cavities, old woodpecker holes, rotted pilings, and other natural cavities.’
    • ‘Most larks are ground nesters and build open-cup nests in small, excavated hollows in the ground.’