Definition of nervous wreck in English:

nervous wreck

noun

informal
  • A person suffering from stress or emotional exhaustion.

    ‘by the end of the day I was a nervous wreck’
    • ‘But these workers are also nervous wrecks, for they know that Americans are very angry about the offshoring of middle-class jobs - and American callers often take out their anger on them, using creative combinations of four-letter words.’
    • ‘But how can they learn respect when their parents are paying outlandish prices for them to witness these once mighty animals reduced to nervous wrecks?’
    • ‘I'm actually a complete nervous wreck and shake continuously.’
    • ‘Pregnant women do get given a lot of advice and if you try to follow it all you will end up a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘I never had much confidence in those exit poll numbers though I was prepared to be a nervous wreck over them.’
    • ‘She becomes a nervous wreck and suffers from ghastly nightmares.’
    • ‘You look around and say you'd be a nervous wreck trying to speak here.’
    • ‘But their emotional trip wasn't all sentiment because the very sight of his opponent across the ring was enough to turn any fan, who truly cared, into a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘As the day of the actual test, in the presence of a large and somewhat legendary Texas Department of Public Safety trooper, neared, I was a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘In real life, if you or I found ourselves near a person waving a loaded weapon, we'd be nervous wrecks, our hearts beating so hard as to make us physically ill.’
    • ‘I was 7 months pregnant, I was an absolute nervous wreck because I thought, this is pretty much a lose-lose situation.’
    • ‘In the meantime, I would respectfully suggest to the above named authors that they find some new subject matter, before they turn everyone in the 27-33 age range into nervous wrecks.’
    • ‘Of course, I'm a nervous wreck most of the time [and it's getting worse, which isn't good], and I was not impressed.’
    • ‘Last May, his brother Mohammed was a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘The victim is scared to leave her home because of the threats and is genuinely a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘Oh, but until that second acceptance arrived, I remained a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘Of course, it was not my thing and so I was a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘I will most likely continue to be a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘But these days, the unrelenting interjection of thunderous tanks and the crackle of gunfire, day and night, have turned the mother into a nervous wreck.’
    • ‘Mike was up next and he was, essentially, a nervous wreck but a brave one.’