Definition of neonate in English:

neonate

noun

  • 1A newborn child (or other mammal).

    • ‘Complication of mechanical ventilation in neonates with respiratory distress.’
    • ‘However, efficacy data on these two therapies in neonates is lacking.’
    • ‘Both low and high birth weight term neonates have high fasting and post-glucose insulin levels.’
    • ‘In the vitamin group, 12.5 per cent neonates had birth weight below 2.5 kg compared to 15.6 per cent in the placebo group.’
    • ‘They have the opportunity to work with multiple age groups from neonates to geriatrics.’
    • ‘Well established, scientifically founded criteria for the diagnosis of anemia in the neonate are not available at present.’
    • ‘Radiography is recommended for intensive care patients or neonates but should not be used routinely.’
    • ‘However, there is limited evidence of the safety of antiviral therapy in pregnant women and neonates.’
    • ‘We therefore explain heterogeneity between trials mainly by changes in the conventional treatment of respiratory distress in premature neonates over time.’
    • ‘For neonates we must ensure that all newborn babies have access to the most appropriate care where and when they need it.’
    • ‘Many neonates are diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound, which allows parents to meet with craniofacial team members before the birth of their infant.’
    • ‘The primary reason for treating jaundice in neonates is to prevent neurologic damage.’
    • ‘Although only two trials provided data on requirement of nalaxone by neonates, it was lower in neonates whose mothers had had epidural analgesia.’
    • ‘Clavicular fractures are the most common broken bones in newborns, especially large neonates.’
    • ‘Oxygen therapy is an important but problematic issue in the treatment of prematurely born neonates and in the respiratory insufficiency associated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome.’
    • ‘Passive antibodies transferred across the placenta during pregnancy provide protection for neonates, but this protection is lost fairly soon.’
    • ‘The perinatal characteristics of neonates not included in the study were similar to those included.’
    • ‘Apnea of prematurity is one of the most common and frustrating conditions that nurses, physicians and neonates face in the intensive care unit.’
    • ‘The last four items, however, are not relevant to our review because they refer to delivery of neonates (preterm or term births).’
    • ‘The issue of optimum oxygen concentration for neonates in intensive care remains, even now, unsettled.’
    youngster, young one, little one, boy, girl
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    1. 1.1Medicine An infant less than four weeks old.
      • ‘It is possible that studies of acute respiratory failure may need to analyze infants and neonates as a separate subgroup.’
      • ‘It is usually not significant in immunocompetent individuals, but can be of serious consequence, and sometimes fatal, in neonates, infants, and immunosuppressed patients.’
      • ‘Administration of surfactant in neonates with infant respiratory distress syndrome has led to improved survival rates.’
      • ‘In the absence of vaccination (which can usually prevent neonatal infection) most exposed neonates and young children will be infected and become lifelong carriers.’
      • ‘Fatal complications and outcomes (neonatal death and intracranial haemorrhage) were similar between neonates and infants from two large birth cohorts in the United States after delivery by forceps or vacuum extraction.’
      baby, newborn, young child, little child, little one
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Origin

1930s: from modern Latin neonatus, from Greek neos ‘new’ + Latin nat- ‘born’ (from the verb nasci).

Pronunciation

neonate

/ˈniːə(ʊ)neɪt/