Definition of neighbour in English:

neighbour

(US neighbor)

noun

  • 1A person living next door to or very near to the speaker or person referred to:

    ‘our garden was the envy of the neighbours’
    • ‘There is lots of petty theft and my neighbour next door was burgled.’
    • ‘Their next door neighbours, also a squatting family, were evicted a few days later.’
    • ‘You can tell that you've got scumbags for neighbours when the people next door fulfil the following criteria.’
    • ‘The neighbours living directly next door would play loud music and party into the early hours of the morning.’
    • ‘Next door, her neighbours have decided to sell their apartment and move out of the city altogether.’
    • ‘All of this is told in the aggrieved, obsessed, slightly compassionate tone of a next-door neighbour.’
    • ‘We have a neighbour next door and I just want her to read this rant.’
    • ‘A mere six weeks later I was told my next door neighbours wanted to add an extension to the front of their house.’
    • ‘He woke his younger sister and brother and got them and their mum out of the house before rousing the next door neighbours.’
    • ‘Perhaps it's even arguable whether their next door neighbours should.’
    • ‘Living next to nightmare neighbours can turn your life upside down.’
    • ‘When she was nearly 80, my dear old mum would skip down the garden, jump on to a bench and hop over the wall to check on her next-door neighbour.’
    • ‘Just before four our next door neighbours started up the car engine, revved it and kept it running.’
    • ‘A fireman raced to the aid of his new next door neighbours after they spotted smoke.’
    • ‘Most Australians don't know their next-door neighbours or care what becomes of them.’
    • ‘We did speak with one of his next-door neighbours who claims to be a family friend as well who kind of defended the doctors.’
    • ‘My next door neighbours argue passionately, ferociously and with much slamming of doors.’
    • ‘Don't dogs realise that the next-door neighbours provide their lawns for this purpose?’
    • ‘But I'd sometimes go to the next-door neighbours who had a cow called Buttercup.’
    • ‘The next door neighbours are setting off their fireworks as I type this.’
    1. 1.1 A person or place in relation to others next or near to it:
      ‘I chatted with my neighbour on the flight to New York’
      ‘matching our investment levels with those of our European neighbours’
      • ‘The visit aggravated Japan's already strained relations with its Asian neighbors.’
      • ‘A new government in Iraq raises questions about its relationship to its neighbors.’
      • ‘Proponents say the deal makes sense given America's unique relationship with its southern neighbor.’
      • ‘That is the only choice for Japan to take in order to win back trust from its Asian neighbors and expand relations with them a step further.’
      • ‘Australia has refused to apologize, creating strained relations with its northern neighbor.’
      • ‘Maintaining friendly relations with neighbours and calm within the country are the big tasks ahead.’
      • ‘Each frame is rotated by three degrees in relation to its neighbour and is slightly different in height.’
      • ‘It had good relations with its neighbors and other countries, and the people were largely contented.’
      • ‘The future of our country depends on the level of relations with our neighbors.’
      • ‘Equally important for the new president will be forging stronger relations with Korea's neighbors.’
      • ‘Given your recent history, do you see a future of economic relations with your enormous neighbor?’
      • ‘It is good politics for any country to have friendly relations with its neighbours.’
      • ‘The game in each plant changed from making improvements to making the plant look good in relation to its neighbors.’
      • ‘There are many other areas of international relations with our Asian neighbours that we also need to get right.’
    2. 1.2 Any person in need of one's help or kindness (after biblical use):
      ‘love thy neighbour as thyself’
      • ‘All we can do is, to do right and love thy neighbor.’
      • ‘It went totally against Jesus' commandment love thy neighbour as much as yourself.’
      • ‘To thy neighbours owest thou thine heart, thine self, and all that thy hast and can do.’
      • ‘Jesus preached love thy neighbour and told people not to take an eye for an eye.’
      • ‘Also the things that religion teaches us: love thy neighbour, do not kill and so on, are just ignored.’
      • ‘I'm hoping, however, that it's less of a sin to covet thy neighbor's minivan.’
      • ‘How can one turn the other cheek and love thy neighbor at the same time you are being urged to conquer by the sign of the cross?’
      • ‘Even in the Commandments, it says to love thy neighbor as thyself, not to love thy neighbor more than thyself.’
      • ‘To love thy neighbour as thyself is also a common teaching to many religions.’
      • ‘I mean, these aren't people that are going to turn around and love thy neighbor tomorrow.’
      • ‘If only we kept the commandment, ‘thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself,’ but God forgive us for the way we keep it.’
      • ‘We are trying to realize the core essence of Judaism: to love thy neighbor as thy self.’
      • ‘Humanism promoted the spirit of oneness, ‘Love thy neighbor as thyself’.’
      • ‘The Bible teaches us to love thy neighbor and advocates social responsibility.’
      • ‘Love thy neighbor as one loves thyself is still good advice.’
      • ‘The New Testament injunctions to turn the other cheek and love thy neighbour were a great advance in civilisation.’
      • ‘He believed more in loving thy neighbour than defending his country.’
      • ‘I always thought IX was something about not bearing false witness against thy neighbor.’
      • ‘What Jesus does say repeatedly is to love thy neighbor as thyself.’
      • ‘And Matthew said most important of all, is love, love thy neighbor as thyself.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (of a place or object) be situated next to or very near (another):

    ‘the square neighbours the old quarter of the town’
    • ‘Even in Europe, pensions are uprated in France but not in neighbouring Andorra or Monaco.’
    • ‘A jukebox stood near the end of the bar, neighboured by a golf machine.’
    • ‘Ron and Ken are first cousins who grew up on neighboring farms near Harlan in western Iowa.’
    • ‘He urged the needy to visit offices in neighbouring areas to see if they could be helped.’
    • ‘Isn't it great to be on a par with neighbouring towns with the place full of life and lights.’
    • ‘The region neighboring the telomeres also appears to be rich in duplicated regions.’
    • ‘Petrus and Sandra decided to elope, leaving for neighbouring Swaziland to get married.’
    • ‘It has pressured neighboring countries to shut down their casinos at the border.’
    • ‘Residents from four neighbouring houses spent a night away from their homes as the house was sealed off.’
    • ‘The dead included six from neighbouring Afghanistan and two Pakistani children.’
    • ‘Some of the refugees have fled to nearby islands in neighboring provinces.’
    • ‘The site is in an area neighboring a residential part of the city, north of Harbin.’
    • ‘The store and neighbouring areas were blocked off but no bombs were found on the site.’
    • ‘Parades run over several weekends, so as not to clash with other parades in neighbouring areas.’
    • ‘One has already been set up in neighbouring Castle Road which suffered from the same problems.’
    • ‘Anyone planning a firework display in a rural area should warn neighbouring farmers in advance.’
    • ‘Our soldiers are sent to the south to patrol an area neighboring Chechnya.’
    • ‘When he runs out of his own trees, he will buy in supplies from neighbouring estates.’
    • ‘He heard an elderly woman and a child were among residents in neighbouring flats when the fire started.’
    adjacent, nearest, closest, next-door, next, adjoining, bordering, connecting, abutting, contiguous, proximate
    nearby, near, very near, close at hand, near at hand, not far away, in the vicinity, in close proximity, surrounding
    conjoining, approximate, vicinal
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English nēahgebūr, from nēah ‘nigh, near’ + gebūr ‘inhabitant, peasant, farmer’(compare with boor).

Pronunciation:

neighbour

/ˈneɪbə/