noun

  • A navigational device in an aircraft, ship, or other vehicle.

    • ‘The pilots mulled over the pros and cons of landing at either field, considering distance, available navaids, ground services, and the weather.’
    • ‘I haven't owned an airplane with a navaid in it for over 30 years now.’
    • ‘We had a very experienced flight crew who, whether through unfamiliarity or lack of approach plate review, dialed up the incorrect navaids.’
    • ‘Decades ago, lighthouses evolved into scenic anachronisms as the U.S. Coast Guard converted the sites still in use into fully automated navaids.’
    • ‘The system can also provide information on weather, runways out of service or navaids that are down, among other things, all without talking to any controllers.’
    • ‘If you turn to speak to a passenger or look down to set a navaid while rolling, for example, a swerve is a distinct possibility.’
    • ‘It will use its beep to call you when it receives a message warning of a problem with navaids, severe weather or search and rescue activities.’
    • ‘The second scenario assumes that all conventional navaids are still operating but that 80 percent of aircraft will be GPS equipped.’
    • ‘But we see a very large and continuing international market for traditional navaids.’
    • ‘The defining GPS waypoints have satellite-derived coordinates that are co-located with the ground navaids for that approach.’
    • ‘We rarely fly along the northern edge of the Olympic Peninsula because of its proximity to Canadian airspace and lack of suitable navaids.’
    • ‘The runway will be of asphalt with navaids and adequate lighting for night landing to be provided.’
    • ‘I instantly reached down and dialed in the navaid channel.’
    • ‘We had lost radio contact with ATC because of the mountains, and we had no navaids.’

Origin

1950s: from navigational aid.

Pronunciation:

navaid

/ˈnaveɪd/