Definition of nauseate in English:

nauseate

verb

[with object]
  • 1Affect with nausea.

    ‘the thought of food nauseated her’
    • ‘But on the plane back home, I was nauseated and freezing cold.’
    • ‘We had a special yearning to give them something precious, even though, looking back, it must have been one nauseating meal.’
    • ‘Rims was nauseated and ready to fall over and sleep.’
    • ‘The sick smell emanating from his cigar nauseated Hannah.’
    • ‘It doesn't hurt but you feel nauseated the week after so that even cranberry juice makes you feel sick because it's the same colour as the medication.’
    • ‘Of course, quit exercising if you're dizzy or nauseated, start sweating heavily, or feel so weak and wobbly that you can't maintain your form.’
    • ‘Throughout the next day, Olivia was still nauseated and hurting, and she received another shot of meperidine.’
    • ‘David had to look away from the screen to pacify the faint nauseating feeling that was rising from his stomach.’
    • ‘I wanted to get up and go for a run, but I had a faint headache that was nonetheless making me feel fairly queasy and nauseated.’
    • ‘He had shaggy black hair, yellowed teeth and foul, nauseating breath.’
    • ‘Delores herself won't eat it, because she's a vegetarian, and the minute the bacon finishes burning, she will become instantly nauseated by the sight of it.’
    • ‘When I wake up I'm slightly nauseated, my toes are numb, and I have no idea what day it is.’
    • ‘They had to weave their way carefully through fragrant, stained, whimpering partygoers and paramedics who were beginning to look a bit nauseated themselves.’
    • ‘My gut was aching, I was nauseated and I felt feverish last night… couldn't you tell?’
    • ‘He was nauseated, short of breath, dizzy and drenched in perspiration.’
    • ‘At once they were nauseated and began vomiting, and they retched the whole day’.’
    • ‘We have our food packs, but the sight of food nauseated me and I could not force myself to put it in my mouth.’
    • ‘We had headaches from the smell, and I was so nauseated the last night that I couldn't even eat my dinner.’
    • ‘Imagine the most nauseating roller coaster on earth.’
    • ‘Dustin's pulse roared through his ears and nauseating spurts of adrenaline coursed through his veins.’
    sickening, stomach-turning, stomach-churning, nauseous, emetic, sickly
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Fill (someone) with disgust.
      ‘they were nauseated by the jingoism’
      • ‘One of the most nauseating sights in sport is when a politician suddenly appears on the scene and basks in the limelight of a victorious team.’
      • ‘‘Good morning Thomas,’ she said with a flirtatious overtone that both surprised and nauseated Esther.’
      • ‘Little kids will enjoy the pretty pictures and chortle over the cute Terk - actually a pretty nauseating character.’
      • ‘More nauseating statistics can be found at the Boston Globe.’
      • ‘They have a nearly perfect relationship, which often nauseates their friends, and they are also deeply religious.’
      • ‘Do you have any idea how nauseating your ‘fashion statement’ is?’
      • ‘The play is just a painful series of really nauseating tuneless songs, one after the other.’
      • ‘It nauseates me to see people running after magic pills, worthless dietary supplements, and fad diets.’
      • ‘They are also portrayed as stupidly happy, unaware of how absolutely nauseating their viewpoints are.’
      • ‘Should we be nauseated by people of the older generation expressing their affection?’
      • ‘The modern fashion for celebrities ‘having a go’ at other activities is one of the more nauseating developments of the television age.’
      • ‘I want to be informed, entertained and thrilled by these pioneers, not bored and nauseated by mawkish and self-regarding metaphors.’
      • ‘The idea that you go to heaven if you blow up innocent people is nauseating.’
      • ‘I can't help but feel nauseated by this latest piece of pre-election marketing.’
      • ‘The born-again Christian experience and the corporate experience both nauseate me.’
      • ‘The level of ignorance and intolerance that I saw expressed by my own classmates was enough for me to be nauseated.’
      • ‘I watched a man in tight leather shorts slapping his backside to the cheering crowds and felt nauseated by the sleaziness of it all.’
      • ‘The secret bombing raids were given nauseating code names like ‘Operation Breakfast’.’
      • ‘Rarely has there been a more nauseating sight in a Scottish newspaper.’
      • ‘Politicians and papers responded to the documentary with nauseating hypocrisy.’
      make someone feel nauseous, make someone sick, turn someone's stomach, make someone's gorge rise, make someone's stomach rise, revolt, disgust, appal, repel, repulse, be repugnant to, offend
      sickening, stomach-turning, stomach-churning, nauseous, emetic, sickly
      sicken, make sick, turn someone's stomach, make someone's gorge rise, make someone's stomach rise, revolt, disgust, repel, repulse, be repugnant to, offend
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin nauseat- ‘made to feel sick’, from the verb nauseare, from nausea (see nausea).

Pronunciation

nauseate

/ˈnɔːsɪeɪt//ˈnɔːzɪeɪt/