Definition of naturalism in English:



  • 1(in art and literature) a style and theory of representation based on the accurate depiction of detail.

    ‘his attack on naturalism in TV drama’
    • ‘He lived in Paris 1910-14 and was influenced by the Expressionistic naturalism of Rodin.’
    • ‘At first sight, the painting seems a piece of outright naturalism but detail indicates all is not what it seems.’
    • ‘It represents a rustic vision of Jacob wrestling with the Angel, but the real struggle fought out on canvas is between naturalism and symbolism in art.’
    • ‘The painterly naturalism that we see in these early genre scenes was indeed motivated by a vision of nature - that is, by a vision of human nature conceived in terms both biological and social.’
    • ‘Works on view chart the artist's shift from naturalism to an exploration of existential themes.’
    • ‘The film's authentic feel derives not from naturalism, nor even from realism in any ordinary sense.’
    • ‘It's just an amazing range - from Greek-like naturalism to total abstraction.’
    • ‘This is a magical piece of theatre, with a streak of engaging, sly humour and playfulness that takes you into a theatrical world where naturalism and expressionism, realism and surrealism sit side by side.’
    • ‘These artists advocated a move away from modernist styles to a more straightforward naturalism.’
    • ‘The play calls on the actors to explore different acting styles in scenes that range from kitchen-sink naturalism to loopy surrealism.’
    • ‘He consequently links early photography with the Realist project, tying it to an urge for naturalism in both the arts and sciences.’
    • ‘Gritty realism, social realism, naturalism are among the tags applied to Loach's work.’
    • ‘The script does wobble - we lurch from naturalism to cinematic surrealism, with apparently little to justify it.’
    • ‘The laurel tree, which Correggio renders with great naturalism, simultaneously evokes notions of fidelity, chastity, and poetic attainment.’
    • ‘He combined elements of naturalism and romanticism to create a portrait of Napoleon which was both more physically accurate and more emotionally probing than the work of any of his rivals.’
    • ‘Certainly social realism, naturalism and similar conceptions can and have produced great art and literature.’
    • ‘There's a mix of naturalism and stylization that is not, but almost, perfectly achieved in his images of animals on the cover.’
    • ‘Art nouveau naturalism tends to he expressive.’
    accuracy, exactness, exactitude, precision, preciseness, correctness, scrupulousness
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  • 2The philosophical belief that everything arises from natural properties and causes, and supernatural or spiritual explanations are excluded or discounted.

    ‘this romanticized attitude to the world did conflict with his avowed naturalism’
    • ‘He riles theistic evolutionists, because he exposes their surrender to Darwinian naturalism.’
    • ‘Most of the chapter consists of criticisms of Johnson's writings on naturalism and the philosophy of science.’
    • ‘First, he presents atheism as a form of naturalism - the belief that the natural world is the only world there is.’
    • ‘A supernatural metaphysics has nothing to fear from methodological naturalism.’
    • ‘Similarly, according to many defenders of naturalism, philosophy is not discontinuous with science.’
    • ‘For contrary to what is commonly believed, modern evolutionary theory and philosophical naturalism are quite clearly incompatible.’
    • ‘Methodological naturalism is nothing more than a description of how science is currently practiced.’
    • ‘In brief, the message of this government-promoted television series was that philosophical naturalism and science are one and the same.’
    • ‘Modern scientists have confused these two and believe that science requires philosophical naturalism.’
    • ‘I had always been opposed to naturalism as an explanation of human existence.’
    • ‘Evolutionary theory is no more tied to metaphysical naturalism or atheism than is meteorology or medical science.’
    • ‘The frenzied opposition to Darwinism today is clearly based upon fear that scientific naturalism will undermine religious faith.’
    • ‘As he demonstrates, scientific naturalism has gradually undermined theological explanations of the world.’
    • ‘Substantive epistemological naturalism is the view that all epistemic facts are natural facts.’
    • ‘Nord apparently does not understand that justification for methodological naturalism is purely pragmatic.’
    • ‘The second is philosophical naturalism, which says that everything in the universe is governed by natural law and nothing ever circumvents that law.’
    • ‘A closely related feature of Quine's philosophy is a deep naturalism, which was also inherited from Mill.’
    • ‘When facing the challenge of Darwinian naturalism, three mistakes must be avoided.’
    • ‘Most atheists and other advocates of philosophical naturalism also believe in materialism, the idea that everything that actually exists is material or physical.’
    • ‘In other words, materialistic naturalism says that there is nothing more to me outside of my physical body.’
    authenticity, fidelity, verisimilitude, truthfulness, faithfulness, naturalism
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  • 3(in moral philosophy) the theory that ethical statements can be derived from non-ethical ones.

    • ‘As is well known, he was a powerful critic of ethical naturalism, holding that goodness is a ‘simple’ and ‘nonnatural’ property.’
    • ‘But recent discussions of naturalism in ethics and philosophy of mind return to issues he addressed and this has led to a new appreciation of his position.’
    • ‘I have therefore put up a very brief essay setting out my version of ethical naturalism and showing that ethical naturalism does NOT lead to the abandonment of standards that Leftists pretend it does.’
    • ‘One objection against it is one directed against all forms of ethical naturalism: namely that the biological origins of a sentiment have no obvious bearing on its ethical value.’
    • ‘Like classical naturalism, Finnis's naturalism is both an ethical theory and a theory of law.’