Definition of natural philosophy in English:

natural philosophy

noun

archaic
  • [mass noun] Natural science, especially physical science.

    • ‘This relationship would prompt Descartes to make public his thoughts on natural philosophy (science).’
    • ‘They weren't physicists and chemists in those days, they were natural philosophers, and natural philosophy included mathematics.’
    • ‘When Muir entered the Wisconsin State University in 1861 he chose to follow the science curriculum, taking courses on natural philosophy and chemistry.’
    • ‘At his father's wish, in 1581 he enrolled at the University of Pisa to study medicine, but his first love was mathematics and natural philosophy.’
    • ‘But she also transgressed social norms by dedicating herself to Newtonian natural philosophy.’
    • ‘But they repudiated mechanistic natural philosophy in favour of the view that spirit is the fundamental causal principle in the operations of nature.’
    • ‘Partly it is because many Renaissance humanists for their part were indifferent to or even opposed the scholastic natural philosophy and medicine of their time.’
    • ‘Many mathematicians were interested in natural philosophy, and geology in particular.’
    • ‘Bacon's interest in mathematics and natural philosophy, probably aroused by Peregrinus, took over his life in Oxford after he returned there in 1247.’
    • ‘Within natural philosophy he gave new direction to optics, mechanics, and celestial dynamics.’
    • ‘The secularization of concepts of space was necessary to the new natural philosophy or science.’
    • ‘Academically, Cambridge was characterized by the growth of science, or natural philosophy as it was called, with Newton at Trinity its best-known exponent.’
    • ‘Another topic to which Aristotle made major contributions was natural philosophy or rather physics by today's terminology.’
    • ‘Robert Hamilton succeeded John Mair at the Perth Academy in 1769, later moving to university posts in natural philosophy and mathematics.’
    • ‘Before the book was published Sneddon had returned to Glasgow as a lecturer in physics, or rather natural philosophy as the subject was called in the ancient Scottish Universities at that time.’