Main definitions of nark in English

: nark1nark2

nark1

noun

informal
  • 1British A police informer:

    ‘I'm not a copper's nark’
    • ‘Not that the Chancellor is short of narks in this part of the world.’
    • ‘Most of the narks and whingers have actually left Sydney.’
    • ‘Reluctant nark Adriana is forced to turn to an FBI agent for company.’
    • ‘I wonder if the Canadian police could consider invoicing narks directly?’
    • ‘Dick Turpin is no coppers' nark so have the courage of your convictions to stand and deliver your reasons.’
    • ‘Then the copper whips off a little advert looking for narks to come forward over this purely political offence.’
    • ‘The opprobrium that once attached to informers, snitches, snouts, shoppers and narks in all walks of life no longer exists.’
    informant
    View synonyms
  • 2Australian NZ An annoying person or thing.

    • ‘He would have made his point, saved the pain of being painted a tax nark, while exploiting the Coalition's leadership tension.’
    • ‘I admit I can be a nark on the park sometimes but I hate seeing people losing and still looking happy.’
    irritant, source of irritation, source of vexation, annoyance, source of annoyance, thorn in someone's flesh, thorn in someone's side, pinprick, pest, bother, trial, torment, plague, inconvenience, nuisance, bugbear, menace
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • Cause annoyance to:

    ‘women like her nark me’
    • ‘There were still narked at what the weather had done to their tracks and overhead cables and were holding up the commuters.’
    • ‘After a few moments the problem was obvious and proved that the 1996 team hadn't been totally narked when they reported that the rigging was still upright and intact.’
    • ‘Reviewers, for instance, were narked that the special effects were not all that special.’
    • ‘Young lady also proceeded to nark me by fidgeting continuously.’
    • ‘At that point I had yet to meet an atheist who wasn't narked by the whole thing.’
    • ‘This accolade was accompanied by the wonderful spectacle of dweeby scientists getting narked because they invent everything yet remain unloved and unglamorous.’
    • ‘‘Well it's nothing I've cultivated,’ he says, a bit narked.’
    • ‘I'm a bit narked the Boro game was called off on Wednesday.’
    • ‘This lay-off still narks him, and he grumbles before saying it has been ‘forgotten’.’
    • ‘Now turned 70, he says he passes for mid-50s and is narked that I've pointed out a stiffness in his gait.’
    • ‘I'd put in eight weeks of training, but the controversy has narked me a bit.’
    • ‘So, well done, your girlfriend, for finding a humorous card that actually did the trick - and I'm not at all surprised that she's narked that you just chucked it out.’
    • ‘I was afraid they might have been a bit narked that we didn't tell them’
    • ‘Am most narked at lack of wireless stuff going on here.’
    • ‘I know what's ‘got into her’ - she's narked about what we said regarding Talos.’
    • ‘I've been narked off with studio trailers for years.’
    • ‘Divers even pick up these dozy little sharks, but if you do that you will find yourself with a suddenly alert fish that is probably a bit narked at being disturbed.’
    • ‘This narked a few people, including his apparently unpaid vet and a group who claimed that the animals on his ranch were being treated cruelly.’
    • ‘Also I am narked by the fact that they didn't seem to put too much effort into clearing out my room to make space for my stuff, so I have about half a wardrobe and just no space.’
    • ‘All this has got the genuine aromatherapists a bit narked.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Romany nāk nose.

Pronunciation

nark

/nɑːk/

Main definitions of nark in English

: nark1nark2

nark2

noun

  • another term for narc

Pronunciation

nark

/nɑːk/