Definition of naphtha in English:

naphtha

noun

Chemistry
  • [mass noun] A flammable oil containing various hydrocarbons, obtained by the dry distillation of organic substances such as coal, shale, or petroleum.

    • ‘To avoid having sodium react with oxygen or water vapor in the air, it is usually stored under kerosene, naphtha, or some other organic liquid with which it does not react.’
    • ‘Use a good grade of naphtha, isopropyl alcohol, or butyl cellosolve on polycarbonate domes.’
    • ‘Hancock and Charles Macintosh solved that problem in the early 1820s by dissolving rubber in naphtha instead.’
    • ‘The temblor and subsequent aftershocks are believed to have dislodged the cover of the tank, which was filled with 26,000 kiloliters of naphtha - a highly flammable petroleum byproduct.’
    • ‘They are, however, susceptible to shrinkage from exposure to solvents containing naphtha or turpentine.’

Origin

Late Middle English napte, from Latin naphtha from Greek, of oriental origin; the Latin spelling was introduced in the late 16th century.

Pronunciation:

naphtha

/ˈnafθə/