Definition of name in English:

name

noun

  • 1A word or set of words by which a person or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.

    ‘my name is John Parsons’
    ‘Köln is the German name for Cologne’
    • ‘At age ten I refused to take a saint's name as part of my name for the holy confirmation ceremony.’
    • ‘My maiden name has been my name for my whole life and I saw no reason to change it.’
    • ‘We'd love your ideas on content, presentation and a final name for the show.’
    • ‘The word Hutu is the name for the majority of people who live in the countries of Rwanda and Burundi.’
    • ‘Well, it's just a fancy name for one of the most ancient toys known to mankind: the spinning top.’
    • ‘Meg was a name for a little girl, while Maggie was a name for a teenager.’
    • ‘A couple ended up in the Shenzhen divorce courts after failing to agree on a name for their child.’
    • ‘No matter how confusing the English road names are, the Chinese name for the roads are unique.’
    • ‘The first two letters in this word refers to the names of the four lecturers.’
    • ‘And Frank would love to hear from any of you who can come up with a good name, or a better name for the series.’
    • ‘From the root word Hri meaning imperishable, comes Hiranya the ancient name for gold.’
    • ‘CIA officers have a name for intelligence or military operations that rebound on those prosecuting them.’
    • ‘Carey's relatives call her by her second name and use the French form of my name for me.’
    • ‘However, the children still haven't come up with a name for their new pet.’
    • ‘A ‘sea fret’ is the local name for the thick fogs that occasionally sweep in off the North Sea.’
    • ‘Urticaria is the medical name for red small raised welts which arise from release of histamine in the skin.’
    • ‘Every family had their own name for the plastic wedges you get as rewards.’
    • ‘She always thought it was a funny name for a dad, but it was a comfortable name, a familiar name.’
    • ‘Before he could escort Hazel to the hospital ball, she had to submit his name for Matron's approval.’
    • ‘The botanical name for fennel - Foeniculum vulgare - comes from the Latin word foenum meaning hay.’
    title, denomination, designation, honorific, tag, epithet, label
    View synonyms
  • 2A famous person.

    ‘the big race will lure the top names’
    • ‘The other stories in the collection are jointly authored with other famous sci-fi names and are quite different from the others.’
    • ‘She was actually a bit surprised when a familiar screen name popped up in a private window.’
    • ‘It became his anthem song and made him one of Australia's most famous names.’
    • ‘They may just be eight years old, but their paintings are to hang alongside those of the most famous names in modern art.’
    • ‘I went wherever the food sounded good and then whacked three famous names at the top of the copy, willy-nilly, to keep the editor happy.’
    • ‘Familiar names appear in the credits as they do in many a Wellington release.’
    • ‘One of the most famous names in snooker will be giving a new club in York a big boost later this month.’
    • ‘In fact, if one looks back over the many years of the event, some famous names crop up.’
    • ‘It started life in 1929 as a casino and art gallery, exhibiting the works of such famous names as Toulouse-Lautrec, Rodin and Léger.’
    • ‘The Olympic lightweight class, nevertheless, has produced some big household names.’
    • ‘There are simply no bigger names in the robot acting community than C3P0 and R2D2.’
    • ‘All of the famous names in Bulgarian art can be seen until the end of January.’
    • ‘They went on to become some of the most famous names in postmodern art.’
    • ‘Famous names and faces grace the pages, but this is also a catalogue of America's social change.’
    • ‘College football was bigger then, and the famous names as coaches were college guys.’
    • ‘I picked the wrong one, based on the idea that it had been voiced by a famous name.’
    • ‘The show will also feature a very special celebrity Sports Day with some very famous names.’
    • ‘A famous name might get your foot in the door, but you'd better expect to do all the hard work yourself.’
    • ‘There are famous names, and some unexpected ones too, giving their revealing choices.’
    • ‘Obviously, famous household names can disappoint over time.’
    celebrity, star, superstar, vip, famous person, important person, leading light, celebutante, big name, luminary, mogul, person of note, dignitary, personage, worthy
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1in singular A reputation, especially a good one.
      ‘the school has gained a name for excellence’
      • ‘She's got a family and she works and she's made a good name for herself.’
      • ‘Different salons have acquired a name for a particular service, says a beautician.’
      • ‘Hitherto hopeless footballing nations suddenly emerged from obscurity and started to make a bit of a name for themselves.’
      reputation, character, repute, standing, stature, honour, esteem, prestige, cachet, kudos
      vilify, disparage, denigrate, defame, cast aspersions on, run down, impugn, revile, belittle, abuse, insult, slight, attack, speak badly of, speak ill of, speak evil of, pour scorn on, criticize, censure, condemn, decry, denounce, pillory
      View synonyms
  • 3(in the UK) an insurance underwriter belonging to a Lloyd's syndicate.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Give a name to.

    ‘hundreds of diseases had not yet been isolated or named’
    with object and complement ‘she decided to name the child Edward’
    • ‘Trinidad was named by Christopher Columbus on his third voyage to the New World.’
    • ‘Following South Africa's two wins, the selectors named an unchanged squad of 14 for the final three encounters.’
    • ‘It would be another year before I'd identified it, named it, catalogued it, and was ready to get the hell out.’
    • ‘The title is basically named after that column so obviously it has some importance.’
    • ‘So you can tell without empirical investigation that you're naming the same thing twice; the conditions are satisfied.’
    • ‘I saw her moments after her birth and she was named in my honour.’
    • ‘Our next sets of twins were a boy and a girl, and we named them Christopher Aaron and Charity Ann - Marie.’
    • ‘That posed a challenge in naming the institution.’
    • ‘The puppy was named after the post, so Das refused to tell me its name.’
    • ‘My name wasn't always Noli you know, the people at the orphanage named me Jessica.’
    • ‘For example, some structures are named according to their position with respect to the glenoid for purposes of orientation.’
    • ‘Some are named, the identifying labels of others have been effaced.’
    • ‘The company decided to honor the grandson of their long time employee by naming their newest vessel for him.’
    • ‘A lot of people think that I named her Jacqueline after Jacqueline Kennedy.’
    • ‘Athens is protected by Athene, and the city is named in her honor.’
    • ‘With special consideration, she names her zodiac sign, the Neman Lion.’
    • ‘Subsequently, a new institute was opened for him in Berlin, which was later named the Robert Koch Institute.’
    • ‘When I heard it was going to be correctly named after the book, I was slightly more impressed.’
    • ‘The new myosins were named according to their chromosome position.’
    • ‘This is because a strangely named religious institution was at the heart of the scandal.’
    • ‘Though I do admit that what people are naming their kids these days can be strange.’
    • ‘The third Chakkri ruler established a system of royal titles, and named himself Rama III.’
    • ‘It's now named after the title of one of my all time favourite songs.’
    • ‘People are naming their children Persian names.’
    called, by the name of, baptized, christened, known as, under the name of
    call, give a name to, dub
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Identify correctly by name.
      ‘the dead man has been named as John Mackintosh’
      • ‘Only those that are named in the lawsuits could face bankruptcy.’
      • ‘No schools have been named but a more detailed report containing a break down of pupil numbers and unfilled places is set to be published by September.’
      • ‘The couple, who cannot be named to protect the identity of the boys, had pleaded guilty in January to the three charges.’
      • ‘The stench has become a simple fact of life for those who work here in eight-hour shifts as they carry out their grim task of naming the victims.’
      • ‘The man, who has not been named, was employed at a High School in Warrington.’
      • ‘The ninth victim has not been named but police have identified the eight others.’
      • ‘The single mum, who cannot be named as an order was made preventing the identification of her son, admitted one charge of failing to make sure her child went to school.’
      • ‘A relative, who to protect the surviving girl's identity could not be named, said she felt deeply pained by the incident.’
      • ‘They are formally named as defendants, but nothing turns on that.’
      • ‘The trust, based in England, is not willing to be named until agreements are signed later this week.’
      • ‘The boy, who cannot be identified, has named others in the gang.’
      • ‘And we already have a couple of the suspects already named officially.’
      • ‘At the start of the meeting organisers asked that no-one was named for fear of reprisals.’
      • ‘The boy has not yet been named and a post-mortem is due to be carried out today.’
      • ‘The local sheikh, who has not been named, has been enlisted by the Allies to select committee members.’
      • ‘Police arrived and arrested the teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons.’
      • ‘The worker, who would not be named, said employees had been told by management not to speak to press.’
      • ‘The victim has been identified by Gardaí, but has not been named as all relatives have yet to be informed.’
      • ‘A mother, who would not be named for fear of identifying her two young children, said she was frightened.’
      • ‘The priest, who cannot be named for legal reasons, admitted writing it.’
      • ‘The Report on the running of the Nursery, which can't be named to protect the identity of the young victims, highlights several key points.’
      specified, designated, identified, cited, given, mentioned, selected, nominated, chosen, singled out
      identify, specify, cite, give, mention
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    2. 1.2 Give a particular title or epithet to.
      ‘she was named as Student of the Year’
      • ‘Lido Place was named Chile's Horse of the Year after winning the Chilean Triple Crown in 2001.’
      • ‘The institution was named the Best Bank of Central and Eastern Europe in July this year.’
      • ‘First of all, in the history of naming a Person of the Year we've only had five women.’
      • ‘The college is named Institute of Technology of the Year.’
      • ‘An awards ceremony will be held in January, when one individual will be named Employee of the Year and receive the Achiever of the Year Award.’
      • ‘He was named defensive player of the game at that position in the Senior Bowl.’
      • ‘During the 1994-95 Ashes, he picked up 32 wickets and was named man of the series.’
      • ‘In May, the hotel was named the hottest downtown party scene.’
      • ‘She has been named Employee of the Year by the education catering specialist.’
    3. 1.3 Mention by name.
      ‘the sea is as crystal clear as any spot in the Caribbean you might care to name’
      • ‘Leicestershire have named an unchanged 12-man squad for the Championship match against Somerset.’
      • ‘Other nations bring youngsters to the tournament without naming them in the squad itself.’
      • ‘They have again named an unchanged side, albeit one with a few chinks in the armour which West Indies could exploit.’
      • ‘England's cause this summer has been supremely aided by being able to name an unchanged side.’
      • ‘Colne are likely to name an unchanged side from the one that scored a derby victory at Padiham last Saturday.’
      • ‘Sussex have named an unchanged 12-man squad from the side that defeated Warwickshire to face Middlesex at Hove.’
      • ‘Having praised the performance at Anfield, Allardyce will be tempted to name an unchanged side.’
      • ‘He dates a pretty dancer on the squad named Laila, who honestly cares for him.’
      • ‘Deans has named an unchanged side from the one which beat the Otago Highlanders in last week's semi-final.’
      • ‘Most of us have played in other local bands but nothing worth mentioning to name here.’
      • ‘The extra additions means Crooks, who names an unchanged starting line-up, will not be forced to continue his playing comeback.’
      • ‘Ireland have named an unchanged side from the one that clinched the Triple Crown against Scotland in their last test.’
      mention, make mention of, make reference to, allude to, touch on, speak about, speak of, talk about, talk of, write about, cite, comment on, deal with, go into, treat, treat of, note, point out, call attention to, bring up, raise, broach, introduce
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Appoint (someone) to a particular position or task.
      ‘he was named to head a joint UN–OAS diplomatic effort’
      • ‘Australia names its team to play Ireland on Wednesday with the task of whittling down a side which ran in a record 22 tries on Saturday.’
      • ‘He was just named to the position, returning to the race school where he began his career in 1993.’
      • ‘He was recently named vice chairman of the Presidential Commission to investigate the security leaks.’
      • ‘He has been named in the squad and the coaches are keeping their fingers crossed.’
      • ‘The council has some executive powers, like nominating ministers, changing laws, helping in naming a committee to draft a new constitution and preparing for free elections.’
      • ‘Newly named CEOs are guaranteed a trough of money before they've done any work.’
      • ‘They also had the player of the year, and four players were named to various all-American teams.’
      • ‘He won, was re-elected and was named to the post of mayor in October.’
      • ‘He was named interim dean of the college in September 1994 and appointed dean in May 1995.’
      • ‘The group named him president of the new organization, a position he held for five years.’
      • ‘He was among the first eight players named to the Russian Olympic team last March.’
      • ‘He has not been named for any post in the interim government, and many analysts believe his political influence and power are destined to wane.’
    5. 1.5British (of the Speaker) mention (a Member of Parliament) by name as disobedient to the chair and thereby subject to a ban from the House.
      • ‘The MP said: ‘I had a political point to make by naming him in parliament.’’
      • ‘More exactly relevant here is the fact that Parliament has always been jealous of its privileges, to the point that even naming a member of Parliament in print was a breach of privilege.’
  • 2Specify (a sum, time, or place) as something desired, suggested, or decided on.

    ‘the club have asked United to name their price for the striker’
    • ‘Only 9.4 percent of CPAs from local firms named recruitment and retention as a major problem.’
    • ‘I think I should take further advice before naming a sum.’
    • ‘She had become one of a handful of UK women fund managers whose track records mean they can virtually name their price.’
    • ‘He is thought to favour the retention of the current system, whereby donors of substantial sums are named.’
    • ‘Householders can, in effect, name their own sum assured, and hence dictate the level of premium they are asked to pay.’
    • ‘We really are creatures of habit: The disruption of daily routines was named as the most common daily source of stress.’
    • ‘Isaac names a sum, and all deem it fair but the Prior, who must now name the price of Isaac's freedom.’
    • ‘She seldom knows, before the act, how much money she can expect from a client; by naming a price, she says, you can lose out, as he might want to show his appreciation.’
    • ‘Once I had explained the situation to him, speaking with only a small strain in my voice, Deron named a place that we could meet.’
    • ‘Ossie says the process allows employees to name what's most important to them.’
    • ‘When he was elected mayor, he named East Austin his first priority.’

adjective

  • attributive (of a person or product) having a well-known name.

    ‘specialized name brands geared to niche markets’
    • ‘He had two fights against name opponents where a win would have propelled him into the limelight.’
    • ‘His big decision is whether to go for the kind of player he has brought in so far or chase some bigger name players.’

Phrases

  • by name

    • Using the name of someone or something.

      ‘ask for the street by name’
      • ‘The Full Court in the present case did so by naming the applicant by identifiers and not by name.’
      • ‘Yet in every time, there were men and women who clearly saw this sin and called it by name.’
      • ‘The girl who lapsed into a fit, repeatedly called on a woman by name to come and appease the ghosts she said were strangling her.’
      • ‘We took are places near the coach who had begun to call the rest of the team name by name.’
      • ‘We also made it clear that we would not be mentioning the artists by name and only used pseudonyms when dealing with the press.’
      • ‘She does not want to mention anyone by name, but says she had support in everything she had to deal with.’
      • ‘He admitted he would have had to remember the man by name while dealing with up to 600 referrals a year.’
      • ‘Familiar faces hove into view and the barman greets me by name even though I've not been here for eight months.’
      • ‘Write the name down so you can thank the person by name at the conclusion of the interview.’
      • ‘Finally, Mr. Ghost, are you afraid to identify yourself by name in a letter to the editor?’
      • ‘When she talks about him in a political context, and much later, long after the affair is over, she refers to him by name.’
      • ‘The head of state has called for me by name, but I don't have time for him.’
      • ‘Two men drove up, called her by name and dragged her into their car, witnesses told police.’
      • ‘In a crime which has baffled police, his wife opened the door to a man with an envelope who asked for her husband by name.’
      • ‘They were in the schoolroom scenes, and both are referred to by name.’
      • ‘She sat propped up in bed, bristling with tubes, and called to each of us by name.’
      • ‘The White House did not mention him by name, but they says he certainly had him in mind.’
      • ‘As you may have noticed, I did not mention by name the venue in question for fear of legal action.’
      • ‘Must have been rather noisy if they all greeted each other by name.’
      • ‘Significantly it is undated and Jekyll and Hyde is not mentioned by name.’
  • by (or of) the name of

    • Called.

      ‘a woman by the name of Smeeton’
      • ‘He had no family connections in the area and was thought to have lived in the Workington area of Cumbria and to have gone by the name of Stig.’
      • ‘This was followed by another lad going by the name of Thanksgiving, who wore his jumper artistically inside out.’
      • ‘But the day before, a man by the name of Ah Qiang was arrested when he set off to sell vegetables.’
      • ‘Council officials said they would inform the Councillor of the name of the worker they were dealing with so that the committee members could get in contact with him.’
      • ‘Well, if you live in a South African city by the name of Port Elizabeth, you don't have to imagine.’
      • ‘A Jerusalem newspaper vendor, who goes by the name of Nava, immigrated to Israel from Morocco as a child.’
      • ‘Finally something gave way, and a woman by the name of Brenda tackled the guy and order was restored.’
      • ‘I used to know a publican in Bristol by the name of George, who always built the most splendid of fires.’
      • ‘It demands nothing of its audience and offers only a self-flattery that goes by the name of self-esteem.’
      • ‘The Act of Succession of 1801 bars people by the name of Christopher from ascending the throne.’
      called, by the name of, baptized, christened, known as, under the name of
      View synonyms
  • give someone/something a bad name

    • Damage the reputation of someone or something.

      ‘the gas guzzling machinery that gives the country such a bad name’
      • ‘For others, his failures began to give democracy a bad name.’
      • ‘The words "organised chaos" would have been giving chaos a bad name!’
      • ‘By giving anti-communism a bad name, McCarthy did communism a huge service.’
      • ‘By the 1970s, the sheer quantity of mediocre boxy office buildings had given the style a bad name.’
      • ‘Thank goodness they claim to be non-political otherwise they would be giving politics a bad name!’
      • ‘The characters could give stereotypes a bad name; the dialogue is laboriously unfunny, the plot woefully laughable.’
      • ‘The first phase of financial crisis gave capitalism a bad name.’
      • ‘The attempt to put a positive spin on negative statistics is an insult to common sense which gives politicians a bad name.’
      • ‘The ending of the film is exactly the kind of thing which gives art house a bad name.’
      • ‘However, there are always going to be the stupid minority who give the rest a bad name.’
      vilify, disparage, denigrate, defame, cast aspersions on, run down, impugn, revile, belittle, abuse, insult, slight, attack, speak badly of, speak ill of, speak evil of, pour scorn on, criticize, censure, condemn, decry, denounce, pillory
      View synonyms
  • give one's name to

    • Invent, discover, or be the source of something which then becomes known by one's name.

      ‘the company's founder, Henry Ford, gave his name to Fordism’
      • ‘Other celebrities giving their name to video games.’
      • ‘He gives his name to Leeman Road, the site of the National Railway Museum.’
      • ‘Cities, islands, waterfalls, lakes, rivers, universities, museums, and architecture, just to name a few, are all named for the Queen who gave her name to an era.’
      • ‘In the Roman calendar she gives her name to ‘days of chastity’, puri dies, with which we may perhaps compare the Ember Days of the Christian Church.’
      • ‘The god Hermes who gives his name to ‘hermeneutics’ was not only a thief, but also a mover, a shifter, of border and boundary markers - a warning to all interpreters!’
      • ‘The History begins with the settlement in Britain of a great-grandson of the Trojan hero Aeneas, whose name was Brutus and who purportedly gave his name to the island.’
      • ‘Although he only gave his name to the windscale because he popularised it, rather than invented it, he called himself a ‘meteorological philosopher’.’
  • have someone's name on it

    • Be destined or particularly suited for a particular person.

      ‘the bomb probably had my name on it’
      • ‘We're a hell of a moving target every time we go to sea and who's to say that a torpedo doesn't have our name on it and we end up at the bottom of the Pacific.’
      • ‘Nearly every plan and dream had Helen 's name on it.’
      • ‘But, like the barrier, neither bullet had my name on it and I managed to get away.’
      • ‘He has been running well in defeat this summer and this £10,000 prize could well have his name on it.’
      • ‘Any senior official suggesting events were inevitable, that the next bomb could have your name on it, would probably have been sacked for undermining public confidence.’
      • ‘One of those instant decisions - this is where I want to live. This place has my name on it.’
      • ‘It's the only job I've ever been at all Machiavellian about because, as far as I was concerned, it had my name on it.’
      • ‘The disappointed visitors were applauded off by relieved Everton fans who must surely now feel that the cup has their name on it.’
      • ‘That bomb in distant Jakarta had your name on it.’
      • ‘Yet it is for hitting form so spectacularly in Japan and Korea in the summer, that the award really must have his name on it.’
  • have to one's name

    • often with negativeHave in one's possession.

      ‘Jimmy hadn't a bean to his name’
      • ‘The only money you have to your name belongs to a diamond and a lady.’
      • ‘We can attract students from all over the world because they want a piece of the tradition of great success that we now have to our name.’
      • ‘Now all I have to my name is an overstuffed backpack.’
      • ‘He has to his name over 20 scholarly publications that appeared in this country and abroad.’
      • ‘The jury felt differently, and awarded a judgment that amounted to just about every dime I had to my name.’
      • ‘He was a highly paid hacker for the government and that was all he had to his name.’
      • ‘Drawing was the one thing I had to my name, but hardly a soul knew it.’
      • ‘He prefers to keep going, not dwelling too long on the achievements he already has to his name.’
      • ‘Water will be rushing all around you along with floating bodies, furniture, cars… everything you have to your name is lost under that water.’
      • ‘One pair of faded jeans and purple boxer shorts were all he had to his name - he didn't even have shoes.’
      possess, own, be in possession of, be the owner of, be the possessor of, be the proud possessor of, have in one's possession, have to one's name, count among one's possessions, be blessed with, boast, enjoy
      View synonyms
  • in all but name

    • Existing in a particular state but not formally recognized as such.

      ‘these polytechnics had been universities in all but name for many years’
      • ‘First, the old polytechnics were rebranded as universities - a process of levelling-down that has really meant many old universities becoming polys in all but name.’
      • ‘After the Revolution of 1905, law faculties were founded at women's higher courses that had become universities in all but name.’
      • ‘It's quite clear what they're doing: this is basically gay marriage in all but name.’
      • ‘True, it had now rebelled against the mother country and was a pariah state: but it was still recognizably British in all but name.’
      • ‘Sometimes you know you are running a murder investigation in all but name.’
      • ‘The report accused the bank of a cover-up in all but name and the bank faces a bill of over €34m for overcharging clients and related interest due.’
      • ‘While it isn't being called marriage, it is the creation of a relationship that is marriage in all but name.’
      • ‘That's why the civil unions law in Connecticut has them so hyper - they recognize it as the equivalent of marriage in all but name.’
      • ‘The authority to award degrees makes the institution a university in all but name, he said.’
      • ‘It's a brownfield site in all but name, even though there are plans to demolish some buildings to try and make it look more like green belt.’
      in effect, effectively, all but, more or less, practically, almost, nearly, close to, approaching, not far from, nearing, verging on, bordering on, well nigh, nigh on, just about, as good as, essentially, in essence, in practical terms, for all practical purposes, to all intents and purposes, in all but name, as near as dammit
      View synonyms
  • in someone's name

    • 1Formally registered as belonging to or reserved for someone.

      ‘the house was in her name’
      • ‘Guns may be held only by people deemed competent by police, and the firearm must be registered in the holder 's name.’
      • ‘Mayo County Council claims that the land is registered in their name and has been since November, 2000.’
      • ‘These applicants can now proceed with their application without having to fully register the land in their name.’
      • ‘Your legal team will check that the property is registered in the seller 's name at the Spanish Land Registry and that there are no charges against it.’
      • ‘Houses in urban areas, they said, were inherited by individuals and could be disposed of as the heir saw fit since it would be registered in the heir 's name.’
      • ‘Her attorney told the court on Monday that a property belonging to her husband and registered in his name would be put up as surety for the amount.’
      • ‘But she did not know that a friend had given him a mobile phone and the phone company gave him £7 credit when he registered it in his name.’
      • ‘A general principle of trust law is that the beneficial ownership of a property remains with the person who paid for it, even if a property is registered in another person 's name.’
      • ‘I have multiple domain names registered in my name and e-mails associated with that.’
    • 2On behalf of someone.

      ‘he began to question what had been done in his name’
      • ‘A union has the power to repudiate action purportedly done in its name and on its behalf, but there are stringent conditions.’
      • ‘Maalouf has also noted that the sultana ruled as Umm Khalil, minted coins in her own name and had the Friday sermon pronounced in her name.’
      • ‘It is one thing to be held responsible for what you do when alive but another to be vilified for things done in your name 1800 years after your death.’
      • ‘I'm sure this is a failing on my part, but I'm an educated sort of person and, when living in the UK, could have a decent stab at naming and shaming those who ruled in my name.’
      • ‘The way that anyone can change foreign policy is to get elected to office, so you've no one to blame for making poor decisions in your name.’
      • ‘Do not allow yourself to be spoken to as if you were a child or an idiot by the people you chose to govern you unless you're prepared to have them make terrible decisions in your name.’
      • ‘You have to stand up, look your government in the eye and hold them to account for what they do in your name.’
      • ‘The site is the best place to get the unadulterated lowdown on what your MP has said and done in your name.’
      • ‘Because one of citizenship's burdens is the obligation to stop national leaders doing terrible things in your name.’
      • ‘It is possible if not probable that if you receive spam (junk email) that it has also been sent out in your name.’
  • in the name of

    • 1Bearing or using the name of a specified person or organization.

      ‘a driving licence in the name of William Sanders’
      • ‘The trust gets together every year to organise commemorative ceremonies and to give away an award in the name of the actor.’
      • ‘Another time a building society withdrew cash from a child's account because it was in the name of his parents, who owed them money.’
      • ‘However, a non-trivial number of aircraft continue to fly in the name of firms named by the UN.’
      • ‘In 1649 they officially claimed the island in the name of the king and named it Bourbon.’
      • ‘This is usually a passport or driving licence and a utility bill in the name of the individual applying for credit.’
      • ‘This was paid out in the name of the person appearing on the package as the addressee and for his account.’
      • ‘The offer was made in the name of the family, but title was actually taken in the name of the company.’
      • ‘One account was maintained in the name of the first clerk and the other account in the name of the second clerk's wife.’
      • ‘The first three properties are said to stand in the name of his wife, and the fourth in the name of his son.’
      • ‘More pages of text have been preserved in Archytas' name than in the name of any other Pythagorean.’
      1. 1.1For the sake of.
        ‘he withdrew his candidacy for the post in the name of party unity’
        • ‘A lot of war has been done in the name of freedom, in the name of many principles that we have.’
        • ‘If the man from the Labour Party says no, he appears ungracious and unwilling to put aside political differences in the name of unity.’
        • ‘It only represents a small number of people who enjoy killing animals in the name of sport.’
        • ‘We have abandoned representative democracy in this country in the name of participatory democracy.’
        • ‘Let's bring in a company who's sole focus appears to be putting the little guys out of business in the name of making more money.’
        • ‘In the name of democracy, in the name of liberty, in the name of fraternity, we kill so many people.’
        • ‘The king, like most autocrats, appears to believe that he speaks in the name of the people.’
        • ‘Some die in the name of, or for the sake of trying to attain, a much much worse life for others.’
        • ‘Benedictine spirituality does not set out to burden some of the sake of others in the name of community.’
        • ‘We are here today in the name of Jesus, in the name of our children.’
        as a representative of, as a spokesperson for, for, in the name of, with power of attorney for, in place of, on the authority of, at the behest of
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2By the authority of.
        ‘crimes committed in the name of religion’
        • ‘These acts of barbarism were committed in the name of official military policy.’
        • ‘If Islam has thrown up its extremists, we can recall the excesses committed over centuries in the name of Christianity.’
        • ‘The time is overdue for public outrage at the crimes being committed in the name of criminal justice.’
        • ‘Religious hypocrisy and atrocities committed in the name of faiths underlie much of the history of the world.’
        • ‘I think that fraud and forgery offences were committed in the name of the prime minister.’
        • ‘Execution is committed by the state in the name of the people.’
        • ‘Thus it is that some of the gravest crimes against humanity are committed in the name of religion.’
        • ‘But the sad truth is that the worst atrocities continue to be committed in the name of national security.’
        • ‘I was told that whatever problems I had could be solved by taking authority over them in the name of Jesus.’
        • ‘Some of our leaders want to remove things biblical for the sake of being fair to other faiths in the name of human rights.’
      3. 1.3Used for emphasis.
        ‘what in the name of God do you think you're doing?’
        • ‘Who in the name of God would call a bishop ‘bish’?’
        • ‘How in the name of whichever gods did they ever pass their driving tests?’
        • ‘What in the name of God would bring to this place?’
        • ‘What, in the name of God, were we supposed to do with several thousand almost-but-not-quite out-of-date cream crackers?’
        • ‘‘Look, the chaps were wrong but in the name of God can you tell me how it took three weeks to sort it out, and it's still not sorted out,’ he said.’
  • in name only

    • By description but not in reality.

      ‘a college in name only’
      • ‘Well, first of all, he is a Democrat in name only.’
      • ‘Government defendants can be defendants in name only.’
      • ‘As his presidency progressed he came to distance himself more and more from the High Federalists; by the time he retired he was a Federalist in name only.’
      • ‘The letter was signed: ‘Your wife in name only, Lil’.’
      • ‘The new rich capitalist elite have begun building themselves fantastic palaces with turrets, swimming pools and helicopter pads deep in the woods which are dachas in name only.’
      • ‘Illegal logging activities continue in both protected and unprotected areas, and its status as a biosphere reserve and national park is effectively in name only.’
      • ‘Many people are members of God's Church in name only; they are not really interested in going forward, whilst others are satisfied with the way things are and see no reason for any change.’
      • ‘When I arrived, Indonesia was full of players who were professional in name only.’
      • ‘A national park in name only, this 33-million-acre preserve is pretty much left alone by the Brazilian park service.’
      • ‘The teaching ‘profession’ should not be a profession in name only.’
      fake, faked, affected, assumed, professed, purported, spurious, ostensible, quasi-, contrived, in name only
      View synonyms
  • make a name for oneself

    • Become famous.

      ‘by the time he was thirty-five, he had made a name for himself as a successful railway contractor’
      • ‘If you want to carve your name in stone and really make a name for yourself, America is a place that you have to conquer.’
      • ‘All you budding song writers out there here's your chance of making a name for yourself.’
      • ‘With their distinct north African accent, both bands are making a name for themselves with their unmistakable blend of drum and bass, jazz, funk and electronica.’
      • ‘You can make a decent living, but you have a hard road ahead of you to make a name for yourself.’
      • ‘If the pranksters' aim is to make a name for themselves, they are succeeding.’
      • ‘The pressure's on you to succeed, to make a name for yourself.’
      • ‘During your 40-year teaching career you trained thousands of young writers, many of whom have gone on to make a name for themselves as distinguished authors.’
      • ‘A lot of restaurants, hotels, and bars make a name for themselves when a famous guest stops by and signs a photo.’
      • ‘Now, she's got a familiar name, but she made a name for herself by being an author and columnist.’
      • ‘When is it time to start making a name for yourself?’
      succeed, achieve success, be successful, be a success, do well, get ahead, reach the top, become famous, achieve recognition, distinguish oneself, set the world on fire
      View synonyms
  • name the day

    • Arrange a date for a specific occasion, especially a wedding.

      ‘we knew in our hearts they were ready to name the day’
      • ‘The Government have given one sweetener and are hopeful of giving another before it names the day, but in politics you never know.’
      • ‘There ought to be a divide between what may be considered ideal time for elections, considering this is rain season and the legal provisions and powers of the President to name the day.’
      • ‘To be honest we've been so busy that we never really got round to naming the day before.’
      • ‘The couple have yet to name the day, but they are looking at some time in April and the service will most likely take place in Belgium where her parents live.’
      • ‘He always wanted to marry her but was too busy racing to name the day.’
      • ‘I call it the Wedding Theory - surely, once she names the day he can't back out?’
      • ‘The Labour Government though isn't buying into all the speculation, saying it's the incumbent's prerogative to name the day New Zealanders will go to the polls.’
      • ‘The gaffer has left it with me to name the day, so I need to have a good think about it over the next few months.’
      • ‘The Prime Minister has named the day as September the 17th - just a week shy of the last possible election date.’
      • ‘But the broadcaster stopped short of naming the day its service will launch and how much it will charge.’
  • name names

    • Mention specific names, especially of people accused of wrongdoing.

      ‘if you're convinced my staff are part of this operation, then name names’
      • ‘It would have been good if the commission had named names and offered some specific proposals for persuading these ‘friends’ to change.’
      • ‘Without naming names, he said: ‘Over the last few weeks, a small group of my parliamentary colleagues have decided consciously to undermine my leadership.’’
      • ‘He named names and even linked to me and called me by name.’
      • ‘I don't know if it's necessarily productive to start naming names, but that's why going to places like England and Scotland and Ireland, I think, is necessary.’
      • ‘‘This invasion was perpetrated by Republican employees both on and off the committee,’ he said without naming names.’
      • ‘‘Exploring a topic’ does not necessarily involve naming names.’
      • ‘Some people I know, and I don't plan on naming names here, seem to think my attachment to her is dangerous for my own being, considering the fact I've never met her in person.’
      • ‘And I promise I'll do my best to not just name numbers, but name names as we continue to lose so many brave men and women overseas.’
      • ‘Without naming names, there are a few bad apples, who the public knows are bad apples, who are still on the force, and that's where this perception comes from.’
      • ‘To be more specific and name names just might be a tinge unfair and might lead to accusations of bias for or against certain outgoing councillors.’
  • the name of the game

    • informal The main purpose or most important aspect of a situation.

      ‘the name of the game is short-term gain’
      • ‘They discovered that multiplication was the name of the game because the school struggled to accommodate all the baby gerbils produced.’
      • ‘If familiarity breeds contempt, and change is the name of the game, then how to turn the anti-incumbency in its face?’
      • ‘For the thrifty, there are smaller lanes branching off, where no goods carry price tags and bargaining is the name of the game.’
      • ‘Power is pandered to and pragmatism becomes the name of the game.’
      • ‘The lesson is clear - don't take your seats for granted, especially in a province where swing is the name of the game.’
      • ‘Innovation is the name of the game and so you have jewellery designers coming up with newer designs, albeit based on old styles.’
      • ‘Limits, bans and prohibitions are the name of the game in construction and transport, just as they are in matters to do with smoking and obesity.’
      • ‘‘I know it puts pressure on them saying it publicly but pressure is the name of the game,’ he said.’
      • ‘His idea of ridding the streets of crime involves killing criminals who get in his way - shoot and ask questions later seems to be the name of the game.’
      • ‘Designs may then be further refined to optimize how much product can fit on a pallet, flat pack being the name of the game.’
  • put down (or enter) one's (or someone's) name

    • Apply to enter an educational institution, course, competition, etc.

      ‘I put my name down for the course’
      • ‘Call for the amendments to the treaty, and I'll put down my name and seal to the document.’
      • ‘Just have an open day up at the Aras and anyone that wants to run goes up and puts down their name.’
      • ‘Tina was signing the board, putting down Chase 's name as well.’
      • ‘Almost nine months before, I had put down my name and my deposit on the wait list for a hybrid car.’
      • ‘I have already entered his name in the register.’
      • ‘On December 10, 2001, I signed up the project and entered my name into it.’
      • ‘If you can guess which member of staff read which book you can enter your name in the competition for a delicious Easter Egg.’
      • ‘I wasn't sure what details she wanted to know about so I put down my name and address, age and height and the word weight with a question mark after it (well I didn't know).’
      • ‘I didn't enter my name into the nearly 600-person competition until 10 minutes before the deadline.’
      • ‘‘My mum spotted details in the United magazine and entered my name,’ added Katie.’
  • put a name to

    • Remember or report what someone or something is called.

      ‘viewers were asked if they could put a name to the voice of the kidnapper’
      • ‘He watched TV for a while - a seventies science fiction film featuring a blonde actress he recognised from an American detective series but could not put a name to.’
      • ‘We will keep a close watch on this one and remember the next time you can't put a name to that face you half recognise - we know a man who can!’
      • ‘It was nice to finally be able to put a name to how I felt and what I believed in.’
      • ‘‘I don't care to put a name to what I do,’ he continued.’
      • ‘The antique store was lined with strange, animal masks that seemed alive in the swimming shadows, oddly styled, decorative lamps, and many other items she couldn't put a name to.’
      • ‘The grown-ups were arguing with some old guy I recognise, but can't put a name to.’
      • ‘The human brain has an uncanny ability to distinguish facial features and put a name to them, even when it's someone you've not seen for years or never seen in the flesh before.’
      • ‘Olivia was practicing some nice, fairly hard moves which consisted in cantering in place and some other moves Kathryn couldn't put a name to.’
      • ‘Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London published a paper in the journal Nature last January which puts a name to all this activity.’
      • ‘There were other faces that I couldn't put a name to.’
  • to name (but) a few

    • Giving only these as examples, even though more could be cited.

      ‘the ingredients used are drawn from nature—avocado, lemongrass, and camomile to name a few’
      • ‘The floorboards of the Linenhall hall gently rocked as the both the audience and musicians tapped the various rhythms of jigs, reels, polkas, to name but a few!’
      • ‘I met a girl named Lisa, another named Jane, and yet another named Maryanne, just to name a few.’
      • ‘True, there may be a great many cuter animals - koalas, chinchillas, moomins and ewoks to name but a few, but guinea pigs reap extra appeal due to their peculiar nature.’
      • ‘After being pursued by England, Newcastle and Middlesbrough, to name but a few, he has surprisingly settled for the managerial graveyard that is Aston Villa.’
      • ‘Guests include a podiatrist, a sports masseur, a foot scanner technician for determining the ideal running shoe, personal trainers, dieticians to name but a few.’
      • ‘Some of the past categories have included heritage, youth, environment, culture, sport, community and charity to name but a few.’
      • ‘The show is packed with well-known numbers - Deadwood Stage, Secret Love, Windy City, The Black Hills of Dakota to name but a few.’
      • ‘The dinner menu is more elaborate, offering lobster, bigger than average prawns and monkfish to name but a few, and while filling you up, it won't leave a gaping hole in the wallet.’
      • ‘These include the attractive, symmetrical sandstone facade, well proportion rooms, working shutters and astragal windows, to name but a few.’
      • ‘You can finally appreciate many famous sights in their natural glory: Red Square, St Basil's Cathedral and Bolshoi Theatre to name but a few.’
  • under the name (of)

    • Using the assumed name or designation.

      ‘he wrote under the name of Bowman’
      ‘he initially played under the name of Larry Walker’
      • ‘The nightclub formerly known as Desperados is scheduled to reopen under the name Coyotes Bar and Dance Saloon.’
      • ‘These new high-quality sparkling wines are sold under the name of a region and vineyard of origin, bearing a vintage and almost always the name of a vine variety.’
      • ‘Five non-crime novels by her appeared under the name of Mary Westmacott.’
      • ‘In 1932, under the name of John Lund Ltd, the company turned to the manufacture of precision grinding machines.’
      • ‘Her latest article is published under the name Bethany.’
      • ‘The "group" first came to popularity with a series of 1950s novelty recordings under the name David Seville and the Chipmunks.’
      • ‘The British gag-cartoonist worked under the name "Larry".’
      • ‘In the middle of 1983 Mr Lee formed his own firm in partnership with another solicitor under the name Lee & Thompson.’
      • ‘This demo caused Decca Records to sign him under the name Cat Stevens.’
  • what's in a name?

    • Used to say that names are arbitrary labels.

      ‘‘But was it still an opera?’ ‘What's in a name?’ he replied’
      • ‘Some people will probably mourn the name changing and already there have been murmurings, but my message to them would be ‘what's in a name?’’
      • ‘Not being, nor wishing to be thought racist, I would hate to think there is some truth in the saying, ‘what's in a name?’’
  • you name it

    • informal Whatever you can think of (used to express the extent or variety of something)

      ‘easy-to-assemble kits of cars, lorries, ships … you name it’
      • ‘There was senators and his cabinet people, you name it, they were there.’
      • ‘The total number of indoor shows - ranging from comedy to dance to opera to burlesque to you name it - is 97.’
      • ‘I watched as grandmas walked through fire, grandpas, priests, truck drivers, young mothers, rockers, you name it.’
      • ‘I tried every diet going - you name it - but nothing seemed to work.’
      • ‘Now back to the future: there are lots of carnivals now, for medical blogs, for recipes, for you name it.’
      • ‘Race car, clubhouse, pirate ship, you name it, nothing beats the plain old cardboard box.’
      • ‘Underlings, superiors, competition among contemporaries, you name it, this has it.’
      • ‘Hats, towels, polo shirts: you name it, he was signing it, while also endeavouring to flick away the fag ash he was depositing on the goods.’
      • ‘There's food - rotis, pretty much jerk everything - chicken, goat, cow, you name it.’
      • ‘Whatever the issue of the day - you name it - one would find a few days later that his picture would appear in the paper with a story.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • name someone/something after

    • Call someone or something by the same name as.

      ‘Nathaniel was named after his maternal grandfather’
      • ‘Tamara says she's thinking of naming her new baby after her dead father.’
      • ‘The local village was named Bexar after a Spanish nobleman.’
      • ‘Seattle Weekly music editor Michaelangelo Matos joked that they named the record after their audience.’
      • ‘The hotel chef named the dressing for English actor George Arliss, who stayed there while performing in the play called The Green Goddess.’
      • ‘The protesters claim they found naming his pet after their country derogatory.’
      • ‘San Jose named a street after Steve Wozniack, cofounder of Apple.’
      • ‘Seriously, who names their daughter after a piece of fruit?’
      • ‘Instead, Bruce was accompanied by Roscoe Conkling of New York; the two became fast friends, and Bruce later named his only child after Conkling.’
      • ‘Now, Madison, as you know, for whom this square garden is named after, was our shortest president at 5 feet, 4 inches tall.’
      • ‘Since we're talking about President's Day, I shouldn't neglect to mention the man the big bridge to Jersey is named after.’
      • ‘How about naming some theater for George S. Kaufman?’
      • ‘I would not have, for instance, named an award after her - but others obviously disagree, as the mass e-mail that I reproduce below shows.’
      • ‘I've even gone so far as to reaffirm my father's life by naming my son after him.’
      • ‘Greenpeace named this forest after the region that spans the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau to where it meets the great Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts.’
      • ‘It's kind of like the way neuroscientists have a penchant for naming neurotransmitters after video-game characters.’
      • ‘I don't mean to diminish those other nominees, though I would question the worth of naming a school after a leftist city councilwoman.’
      • ‘They paid the land owner for the fossil and got it out of the ground in days, and as is the custom, they named the dinosaur for its discoverer, Sue.’
      • ‘The family has extensive Scottish holdings and likes to celebrate its Scottish ties - down to naming tankers for sections of their Scottish estate.’
      • ‘Everyone knows Neil Simon, they named a theater after him.’
      • ‘The guy the prize was named after may ring a bell from high school civics, if you're old enough to have had such a class.’

Origin

Old English nama, noma (noun), (ge)namian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch naam and German Name, from a root shared by Latin nomen and Greek onoma.

Pronunciation

name

/neɪm/