Definition of mythology in English:

mythology

noun

mass noun
  • 1A collection of myths, especially one belonging to a particular religious or cultural tradition.

    ‘tales from Greek mythology’
    count noun ‘Jewish and Christian mythologies’
    • ‘For example, Artemis and Diana is the same goddess but are of two mythologies.’
    • ‘We can see its beginnings in Greek mythology with the story of Prometheus.’
    • ‘The idea that the universe had a beginning is common to various religions and mythologies.’
    • ‘The history of ancient Greece and Greek mythology that I studied in high school and college all came alive for me on this trip.’
    • ‘Tonight she will consider the differing beliefs and customs relating to death practices from a selection of cultures and mythologies.’
    • ‘In the mythologies that have come down to us, many cultures express this as a sexual union.’
    • ‘These books are the primary source for our knowledge of the most ancient Indian mythology, forming the basis for the development of Hinduism.’
    • ‘Many mythologies seem to feature an apocalyptic or transformational event that will occur at the ‘end of history’.’
    • ‘In ancient Greek mythology, images of snakes are generally evil and scary, like the Hydra, a large snake with nine heads.’
    • ‘After breakfast he strolls through deserted lanes before retiring to his drawing room to read about archaeology, Greek mythology, and biographies.’
    • ‘Ancient mythologies preserved this knowledge in story form.’
    • ‘I've always been interested in the ancient American mythologies of the Inca, Maya, and Aztec, and the ancient mythos of the Greeks and Egyptians.’
    • ‘One of the best known of the Greek mythologies is the tale of Icarus.’
    • ‘Sacrifice is a universal religious act, one closely associated with the mythologies of particular traditions.’
    • ‘There are numerous mythologies in which the God is sacrificed as grain or as vegetation in general to feed the people.’
    • ‘The legend of the lost continent or island of Atlantis occurs in the mythologies of many parts of Europe.’
    • ‘Pilgrims are treated to plays enacted from stories of Hindu mythology, featuring the well known adventures of gods and heroes.’
    • ‘Such views stem from the fact that some famous characters from Ancient Greek mythology have their origins in Thrace.’
    • ‘Dragons are winged beings portrayed in the ancient mythologies of most cultures.’
    • ‘Now in many other mythologies you can find gods that have parallels with Athena.’
    myth, myths, legend, legends, folklore, folk tales, folk stories, lore, tradition, stories, tales
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A set of stories or beliefs about a particular person, institution, or situation, especially when exaggerated or fictitious.
      ‘we look for change in our thirties, not in our forties, as popular mythology has it’
      • ‘His execution in 1725 was to ensure his place in popular mythology.’
      • ‘British trade union mythology is full of wonderfully stirring stories of doughty workers banding together to take on the government.’
      • ‘Next week, another bit of popular mythology comes under our close examination.’
      • ‘Thanks, Betty, for your stunning and original contribution to American popular mythology.’
      • ‘The popular mythology that the most crowded countries cremate the most is not born out by the facts.’
      • ‘Contrary to popular mythology, not every graduate of the Air Force Academy has a chance to become chief of staff of the Air Force.’
      • ‘Others will assign stories based on them and the false mythology will continue.’
      • ‘There is one other consideration that has led me to expose anti-nuclear mythology.’
      • ‘In popular mythology, kids used to run away from home to do just that.’
      • ‘The stag is not ‘torn to pieces’, as popular mythology would have it.’
      • ‘According to popular mythology, Mexicans don't do breakfast.’
      • ‘The whips have the task of mobilizing their party's backbenchers: popular mythology ascribes to them powers beyond their reach.’
      • ‘A beach, in the popular mythology, was a place of dissolution and wreckage and danger, a place only for the desperate and the scavanging poor.’
      • ‘Contrary to popular mythology, boys are just as anxious and confused about sex as the girls are.’
      • ‘It was, popular mythology tells us, one of the contributing factors to the American Revolution, and it might just lead to a revolution here.’
      • ‘Contrary to today's popular mythology about our past, slavery and exploitation were not taboo subjects then.’
      • ‘They provided indispensable services and became the subject of popular folklore and mythology.’
      • ‘According to popular mythology, this is how it happened.’
      • ‘You'd be pushed to find it in the popular mythology, though.’
      • ‘In the popular liberal mythology, the ad disgustingly questioned Cleland's patriotism.’
  • 2The study of myths.

    ‘this field includes archaeology, comparative mythology, and folklore’
    • ‘Schools replaced mythology and history with the more amorphous social studies.’
    • ‘The student of mythology may find some of this story interesting.’
    • ‘He devoted much attention to comparative mythology and the comparative study of religions.’
    • ‘It drew upon history, mythology and living memory of the Second World War.’
    • ‘I think this same analogy applies very accurately not only to the study of mythology, but to a variety of other fields of thought.’
    • ‘For the past eight years, she has been teaching comparative mythology, a subject in which she has earned a doctorate.’
    • ‘History and mythology have a symbiotic relationship and they reinforce each other to a large extent.’
    • ‘The walkers will enjoy their trek through landscapes filled with history, archaeology and mythology.’
    • ‘These stories reflect the children's ideas and interests and influences range from ancient mythology to television.’
    • ‘A perfect introduction to the history of mythology.’
    • ‘Under his influence her interest in Irish folklore revived, and she began to study Irish mythology, taking her research into the field.’
    • ‘I'm not a specialist in ancient mythology but like most lovers of history I enjoy seeing the vast and great tales of the past brought to life.’
    • ‘He had studied his mythology and knew how to construct an argument.’
    • ‘In general, he offers no support for the plausibility of his theory beyond an ingenious argument from comparative mythology.’
    • ‘They study mythology, gardening, cooking, foreign languages, history, botany and physics.’
    • ‘In the intervening time Rothko stopped painting, devoting himself instead to the study of philosophy and mythology.’
    • ‘His articles on folklore, art, mythology and short stories for children have been widely published.’
    • ‘She had broad-ranging interests, having studied mythology and psychology, in which she gained a PhD.’
    • ‘Baird who has studied mythology since she was a child equips every card with a musing short story on its back cover.’
    • ‘European history, geography and mythology is central to it.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French mythologie, or via late Latin from Greek muthologia, from muthos ‘myth’ + -logia (see -logy).

Pronunciation

mythology

/mɪˈθɒlədʒi/