Definition of mystique in English:

mystique

noun

mass noun
  • 1A quality of mystery, glamour, or power associated with someone or something.

    ‘the mystique surrounding the monarchy’
    • ‘Having retained its aura of mystique and history since time immemorial, it has become a restful corner in our hectic world.’
    • ‘This was the type of game that makes you believe in miracles and curses, mystique and aura, and destiny.’
    • ‘I guess that gave the day something of an air of mystique and charm to start with.’
    • ‘We are left with a line-up which is fresh, appealing and not without its fair share of mystique.’
    • ‘Do you ever sit back and laugh at the mystery or mystique that surrounds you?’
    • ‘There is a telling difference between a band that strives to be mysterious and one that achieves mystique.’
    • ‘Today, the difficulty we continue to have in sourcing many Portuguese wines adds to their mystique and allure.’
    • ‘As a child, there was some mystique associated with a power outage.’
    • ‘Perhaps it is a sign of the home team finally losing its mystique, and most importantly, its aura of invincibility.’
    • ‘His glamour and mystique remain as potent now as they were at their height in 1921.’
    • ‘Much mystery and mystique surrounds opinion polling and focus groups conducted for political parties.’
    • ‘Clearly the participating press participates in the inner workings of power and helps create its mystique.’
    • ‘Historical sites of revolutions are often imbued with an aura of romantic mystique.’
    • ‘No other sports come close to matching the martial arts for a sense of mystique and mystery.’
    • ‘It adds allure and mystique to cricket and is great for spectators.’
    • ‘He is still shrouded in mystique - but he is no longer quite such a mystery.’
    • ‘The monarchy has not been able to maintain its mystique.’
    • ‘Postal voting removes the aura and mystique of the democratic process.’
    • ‘Part of that is her womanly mystique, the undeniable eroticism of the unknown.’
    • ‘Its mystique and appeal will grow with the passage of time every time you see it.’
    charisma, glamour, romance, mystery, fascination, magic, spell, charm, appeal, allure, awe
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    1. 1.1 An air of secrecy surrounding a particular activity or subject that makes it impressive or baffling to those without specialized knowledge.
      ‘eliminating the mystique normally associated with computers’
      • ‘In this book they have captured the magic and mystique of bonefishing.’
      • ‘Unfortunately there is much mystique surrounding trade marks.’
      • ‘I suppose that it's because there's this mystique and marvel surrounding astronauts and trips into space, you know?’
      • ‘The main trainers seem to enjoy the air of mystique that surrounds a lot of it, and they want to take large amounts of your money from you for signing up to their courses.’
      • ‘The legal system's terms and mystique create an impression of complexity and unapproachability.’
      • ‘These products are surrounded by considerable mystique and are often outrageously expensive.’
      • ‘I mean that pretty much deflates the mystique that's surrounding it.’
      • ‘There was a kind of mystique about the Japanese art of Bonsai, which many thought could be mastered only with years of training.’
      • ‘There's too much mystique about writing and too many people never even try it because they assume it's too difficult.’
      • ‘Or perhaps it was the aura of alchemical mystique that surrounds the whole idea of breadmaking?’
      secrecy, darkness, obscurity, ambiguity, ambiguousness, uncertainty, impenetrability, vagueness, nebulousness
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Origin

Late 19th century: from French, from Old French (see mystic).

Pronunciation

mystique

/mɪˈstiːk/