Definition of mystic in English:

mystic

noun

  • A person who seeks by contemplation and self-surrender to obtain unity with or absorption into the Deity or the absolute, or who believes in the spiritual apprehension of truths that are beyond the intellect:

    ‘the poetry of the 16th-century Spanish mystic, St John of the Cross’
    • ‘Most women writers were dismissed as mystics or visionaries, and some as mentally ill.’
    • ‘Like the monastics and mystics at their best, Bondi has a gift for seeing God everywhere.’
    • ‘But although such imagery is offered in scripture and probed by mystics, it is seldom celebrated in church tradition.’
    • ‘Your positions on religion, mystics, psychics, new age medicine, etc. are a breath of fresh air.’
    • ‘On the other hand, Indian sages, philosophers and mystics have held out a shining vision that has inspired the world.’
    • ‘Through the ages Christian mystics have also pursued joy through ascetic, rather than ecstatic, disciplines.’
    • ‘Probably not a direct relationship, but it's interesting to look at some of the great contemporary mystics.’
    • ‘The great mystics and saints have told us that the spiritual journey does include a kind of retreat from the world.’
    • ‘Jung's experience was similar to that undergone by shamans and religious mystics, as well as some artists, writers, and philosophers.’
    • ‘In this view, many religious magicians are not mystics.’
    • ‘Are they behind the mysterious powers of fortune-tellers, mystics, clairvoyants, and palm readers?’
    • ‘Remember, these were humble tradesmen, not high-powered rabbis or mystics.’
    • ‘College undergraduates are not the only people who respond to Christian women mystics in this way.’
    • ‘The words of later Hebrew mystics capture accurately prophetic consciousness.’
    • ‘To be sure, no priest with a decent theological training would want to suggest that any or all his parishioners can become mystics or visionaries.’
    • ‘Freeman, like numerous mystics and contemplatives before him, shows us that our main problem is ourselves.’
    • ‘Christian mystics warn that one has to be ready to let go of everything, even oneself.’
    • ‘He quotes abundantly from Scripture, medieval mystics and gifted contemporary writers.’
    • ‘After all, I had learned from hard experience that there are few bona fide mystics in the world today.’
    • ‘Some Christian mystics champion this view, but orthodox theologians rejected it early on.’

adjective

  • another term for mystical
    • ‘It was at once the most sacrilegious and yet mystic moment many of them had ever experienced.’
    • ‘In fact, there are many mystic traditions that consider dancing as the roadway to God.’
    • ‘It is also an astonishingly powerful, elemental and mystic structure.’
    • ‘Do we need to invoke some sort of mystic intuition?’
    • ‘Their religious rituals shroud themselves in mystic diversity.’
    cryptic, concealed, hidden, abstruse, arcane, esoteric, recondite, inscrutable, inexplicable, unfathomable, mysterious, secret, enigmatic, occult, cabbalistic, obscure, unrevealed
    spiritual, religious, transcendental, transcendent, paranormal, other-worldly, supernatural, preternatural, non-rational, occult, metaphysical, ineffable
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘mystical meaning’): from Old French mystique, or via Latin from Greek mustikos, from mustēs initiated person from muein close the eyes or lips, also initiate. The current sense of the noun dates from the late 17th century.

Pronunciation:

mystic

/ˈmɪstɪk/