Definition of mutable in English:

mutable

adjective

  • 1Liable to change.

    ‘the mutable nature of fashion’
    • ‘Their meaning seems overwhelmingly important but mutable, depending on the context.’
    • ‘His narratives, in which he translates current events, are too allegorical to be history, yet too mutable to be myth.’
    • ‘Daily life gets a different kind of soundtrack, endlessly mutable and instantly reconfigurable.’
    • ‘A website is a mutable message that maintains the same reference.’
    • ‘It is, without doubt, a very exciting, innovative, constantly changing, hugely mutable and malleable tool.’
    • ‘But all truth isn't mutable, because some things can't be changed.’
    • ‘Living in an ex-colony, I've discovered, means that place-names are highly mutable.’
    • ‘It also lines pop up with genetic engineering, the idea of the human form in the 21st Century becoming fascinatingly mutable.’
    • ‘In this fiction the main characters are mutable, changing with the environment.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, mutable interpretation and reaction will always be there.’
    • ‘The former is fluid, mutable, and, above all, contested.’
    • ‘That media is mutable and can shift around their environment to meet their wishes and needs.’
    • ‘Given this endlessly mutable document, how to tell when there's a useful revision and not an in-progress one?’
    • ‘My beliefs are mutable and transmittable and who I am is constantly changing.’
    • ‘It is, rather, simply a part of the personal developmental experience, formally mutable and changing frequently.’
    • ‘Because of its mutable, unstable, and floating quality, eroticism often turns up in places where it might be assumed to have been completely eradicated.’
    • ‘As the questioning continues, it becomes apparent that truth is slippery and mutable.’
    • ‘Everything was mutable: eye color, hair color, skin tone.’
    • ‘Flexible, adaptable and mutable are adjectives not normally applied to Capricorns.’
    • ‘However, the dynamic, mutable nature of open source often results in complexity.’
    changeable, variable, varying, fluctuating, shifting, inconsistent, unpredictable, inconstant, uncertain, fluid, erratic, irregular, uneven, unsettled, unstable, unsteady, protean, chameleon-like, chameleonic
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    1. 1.1literary Inconstant in one's affections.
      ‘youth is said to be fickle and mutable’
      undependable, untrustworthy, irresponsible, reckless, fickle, capricious, irregular, erratic, unpredictable, inconstant, faithless, untrue, flighty, slippery
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin mutabilis, from mutare ‘to change’.

Pronunciation

mutable

/ˈmjuːtəb(ə)l/