Main definitions of murid in English

: murid1murid2

murid1

noun

Zoology
  • A rodent of a very large family ("Muridae" ) which includes most kinds of rats, mice, and voles.

    • ‘Two prime examples of this are the murid rodents (Chinese vole, Norway rat, and house mouse) and the lagomorphs (rabbit, European hare, and pika).’
    • ‘Within rodents, relations are similar to those obtained and discussed previously, notably without any resolution of the relations between four main rodent lineages: murids, sciurids, glirids, and hystricognaths.’
    • ‘Around 1150 living species of murid rodents have been described, but surely many more remain to be discovered.’
    • ‘This work shows that five marsupials, two hedgehogs, a shrew, a mole, four mongoose, a raccoon, two mtistelids, and 15 rodents (including three sciurid and eight murid rodents) have some form of resistance to venom toxins.’
    • ‘These include the shrews, some moles, some bats, the striped skunk, the pinniped carnivores, toothed whales, the aardvark, and murid rodents.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from modern Latin Muridae (plural), based on Latin mus, mur- ‘mouse’.

Pronunciation

murid

/ˈmjʊərɪd/

Main definitions of murid in English

: murid1murid2

murid2

noun

  • 1A follower of a Muslim saint, especially a Sufi disciple.

    • ‘With the devotee - master or disciple, shaykh or murid - we are made aware of a new and culturally salient perspective on music.’
    1. 1.1 A member of any of several Muslim movements, especially one which advocated rebellion against the Russians in the Caucasus in the late 19th century.
      • ‘The Murid Islamic Community in America held their annual Celebration of Sheikh Ahmadou Bamba Friday, July 28, 2000.’
      • ‘The Czar moved quickly to quell any other uprising, officially annexing the tribal heartlands and forcing thousands of murids, as well as entire clans, to flee to the Ottoman Empire.’
      • ‘As Shamil's murids [adherents or partisans] continued to resist, Russian forces poured into the region, eventually capturing Shamil in 1859.’

Origin

From Arabic murīd, literally ‘he who desires’.

Pronunciation

murid

/mʊˈriːd//mjʊˈriːd/