Main definitions of mummy in English

: mummy1mummy2

mummy1

noun

  • (especially in ancient Egypt) a body of a human being or animal that has been ceremonially preserved by removal of the internal organs, treatment with natron and resin, and wrapping in bandages:

    ‘the mummy of Tutankhamen’
    • ‘Lizard, fish, and even beetle mummies from ancient Egypt have been unearthed.’
    • ‘The team examined samples from four animal mummies - two hawks, a cat, and an ibis - dating from 818 B.C. to 343 B.C.’
    • ‘Who doesn't love a good mummy - those lumbering creatures that will chase you tirelessly?’
    • ‘Medical care in ancient Egypt was advanced: mummies have been found which have artificial teeth and well-set fractures.’
    • ‘During her studies she worked with the British Museum examining the paints used on the sarcophagus of an Egyptian mummy to find out how the ancients had created a new colour.’
    • ‘I learn that one ice cream ingredient, locust bean gum, was used in ancient Egypt to seal the wrappings on mummies.’
    • ‘Above all, thousands of mummies found all over Egypt bear witness to how they believed, more than any other culture in history, that the human body played a part in the continued survival of the spirit.’
    • ‘He accused the team of being unethical in implementing their forensic examination, as well as disregarding the use of scientific procedures while removing the fragile mummy from its golden sarcophagus.’
    • ‘The Tutankhamun CT scan project was only the first step in a five-year endeavor to scan and preserve the ancient mummies of Egypt, many of which are crumbling.’
    • ‘One theory suggests that examination of his mummy revealed a wound near his left ear, which would have caused a cerebral haemorrhage.’
    • ‘The ceremony ‘opening of the mouth’ was carried out by priests on both the mummy and the mummy case in order to prepare the deceased for the journey to the afterworld.’
    • ‘Nothing has more capacity to astonish, when the wrappings of a mummy have been removed, than the state of preservation of the forms of the face.’
    • ‘This all results from my fascination with mummies and other bodies preserved from ancient times.’
    • ‘In this study, we describe an infant mummy from ancient Egypt that showed macromorphologic signs of chronic anemia and vitamin C deficiency.’
    • ‘From ancient Egyptian mummies to Iron Age bog bodies found in northern Europe, human remains reveal much about past cultures.’
    • ‘The whole topic of investigating human remains is hugely popular with the general public, which adores the ghoulish and grisly: mummies are always big attractions in museums.’
    • ‘It has already been used to scan historical artefacts, including Egyptian mummies, and body organs and bones for teaching medical students.’
    • ‘Such jars were used in ancient Egyptian burials to store the internal organs of mummies but the jar is the only example in the Harrogate collection to contain a residue.’
    • ‘The skeleton turned out to be a composite of three individuals, the head and lower jaw having been replaced during the mummy's long history.’
    • ‘The mummy is associated with the legends of Egypt, but archaeologists have excavated preserved human remains the world over.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a substance taken from embalmed bodies and used in medicines): from French momie, from medieval Latin mumia and Arabic mūmiyā embalmed body, perhaps from Persian mūm wax.

Pronunciation:

mummy

/ˈmʌmi/

Main definitions of mummy in English

: mummy1mummy2

mummy2

noun

British
informal
  • One's mother:

    ‘he loves his mummy’
    [as name] ‘here's Mummy’
    • ‘One of my greatest memories is when a four-year-old autistic child who had only ever uttered isolated words suddenly said ‘I love you mummy, I love you daddy’.’
    • ‘My little boy knows that he has a mummy and a daddy who love him very much and love each other very much and that's what counts.’
    • ‘‘I loved being a mummy but that has been taken away from me,’ she said.’
    • ‘Grace had once been a kind, sweet child who loved her mummy and daddy and couldn't stand to be away from them for more than a day.’
    • ‘A message, one of many at the roadside shrine, read: ‘We miss you lots, we will love you for ever, love mummy and daddy.’’
    • ‘We asked them to draw a picture of their mummy for a Mother's Day card.’
    • ‘‘I know she's not my real mummy,’ Gully says, ‘but she loves me and I love her, and isn't that what matters?’’
    • ‘It is in one sense anthropomorphic to believe that fish love their mummies and daddies and go to school under the river and grow up to be good little fish.’
    • ‘Is she suggesting that ALL mothers should not work but be mummies full time?’
    • ‘May your mummy still love you when you dye your hair green.’

Origin

Late 18th century: perhaps an alteration of earlier mammy.

Pronunciation:

mummy

/ˈmʌmi/