Definition of multiform in English:



  • Existing in many forms or kinds.

    ‘a very complex, multiform illness like cancer’
    • ‘Rembrandt's many and multiform self-portraits, unprecedented in their time and virtually unparalleled until the twentieth century, must be central to any consideration of his view of himself and his artistry.’
    • ‘She was a multiform deity; sometimes depicted as human with a bovine head, other times as a pregnant cow.’
    • ‘And grand are their laws, so multiform, puzzling, evolutionary,’
    • ‘Her use of the word is idiosyncratic, and while some may object that its elasticity and multiform character makes it suspect, others may find it a helpful way of conceiving of historical inquiry.’
    • ‘Lovers of freedom, lovers of social justice, disarmers, peacekeepers, civil disobeyers, democrats, civil rights activists, and defenders of the environment are legions in a single multiform cause.’
    • ‘In fact, it is widely understood that property is multiform.’
    • ‘Infrequent and uniform extra beats or ectopics are of no significance, unless they are multiform in nature, are repeated in succession and occur frequently.’
    • ‘Their gibbering hybrid of beer-hall chants, dramatic pseudo-emoting, spooky synths, throbbing rhythms, and tortured, swirling arrangements remained multiform and strange, but were internally consistent.’
    • ‘Cricket, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, is more than any other, the most common ground for all the multiform and opposing elements of the global Indian nation.’
    • ‘Here, it is crucial that there is no formula that connects them, that our experience is irreducibly multiform.’
    • ‘It seems to me that it is innovative, though - after all, it's multiform, it's transgressive (most notably of personal boundaries), and it enacts some of the wilder aspects of textual theory in a rather uncontrived way.’
    • ‘It is a multiform creature, bound to transform at each new appearance and new issue.’
    • ‘If these functions and actions lead to a definite end, making folktales uniform and identifiable, the characters and their attributes change, making the tales multiform.’