Definition of multifactorial in English:

multifactorial

adjective

  • Involving or dependent on a number of factors, especially genetic or environmental factors.

    • ‘The authors of this study suggest that the etiology of the syndrome is multifactorial, including anxiety and, possibly, asthma.’
    • ‘Furthermore, consumers recognize the importance of overall diet and the multifactorial nature of diet-related diseases.’
    • ‘Usually, delirium is multifactorial, and other causes should be identified.’
    • ‘The etiology of reduced diaphragm strength is potentially multifactorial.’
    • ‘The aetiology of obstetric cholestasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, with genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors having important roles.’
    • ‘Because of the many etiological factors involved, multifactorial diseases are not, strictly speaking, the sole result of hereditary transmission.’
    • ‘Potentially this may indeed lead to new diagnostics, new ways of conducting clinical trials, and conceivably a more rational approach to therapy in common multifactorial diseases.’
    • ‘Conduct disorder has a multifactorial etiology that includes biologic, psychosocial and familial factors.’
    • ‘International clinical guidelines now include exercise as an important component of an effective multifactorial intervention for the prevention of falls.’
    • ‘Oral disease, especially dental caries, is complicated and multifactorial, and it often begins to develop during infancy.’
    • ‘As they state, fracture prevention is a multifactorial problem.’
    • ‘Non-compliance is a multifactorial problem and requires multifactorial responses.’
    • ‘Rheumatoid arthritis is a multifactorial disease determined by both genetic and environmental factors’
    • ‘The ones that every physician sees are multifactorial and very hard to deal with.’
    • ‘Clubfoot is a complex, multifactorial deformity with genetic and intrauterine factors.’
    • ‘The decline in the use of obstetric forceps is multifactorial although many of the factors are inter-related.’
    • ‘Age, sex, and the presence or level of relevant factors are used in multifactorial or global estimates of real risk to see whether the risk threshold for intervention has been crossed.’
    • ‘Some of the most common chronic diseases are multifactorial genetic disorders.’
    • ‘This book starts with a basic discussion about genetic diseases and multifactorial disorders.’
    • ‘The risk of developing hip osteoarthritis is likely to be multifactorial, depending on individual genetic susceptibility and local mechanical risk factors’

Pronunciation:

multifactorial

/mʌltɪfakˈtɔːrɪəl/