Definition of mucky in English:

mucky

adjective

  • 1Covered with dirt or filth:

    ‘he took off his mucky boots’
    • ‘The ground looked good from the beginning though and even on the mucky entrance to the course carloads of immaculately-dressed beauties were everywhere.’
    • ‘Muttering and cursing to herself she pulls herself upright and finds that her trousers are covered in mucky water from a bowl that has been left on the floor.’
    • ‘Across the mucky yard what can only be described as a run down shed, with a tarpaulin roof and a piece of pallet for a gate, was home to four Alsatians.’
    • ‘I don't know what I'd do without mine, as my back window gets terribly mucky in rainy weather.’
    • ‘Show officials, stewards, judges and workers were in abundance and the hands-on people could easily be recognised by their mucky boots and ill-fitting, handed down bowler hats.’
    • ‘I was walking down the main street and I saw a duck eating a dirty, mucky wet leaf - the poor things are not finding food.’
    • ‘A number of elderly supporters failed to hold their footing and had to be assisted back up off the mucky ground with their clothing clearly soiled.’
    • ‘A million pot-holes, mucky streets, traffic jams topped by heavy showers ensure a two-hour drive to the nearest mall.’
    • ‘The bus hurtled by, spraying a mucky puddle over my shoes.’
    • ‘Sunlight swarms through and over the pale-green saw grass, plays along the surface, dives down to the dark, mucky bottom, and spreads back up to engulf our little group.’
    • ‘Tash had been right; they were unlikely to come across anyone in these deserted side-ways, yet they weren't dirty or mucky like the alleys of the city.’
    • ‘The driver's side window opened, which allowed more water to pour into the car and also make it sink further into the mucky bottom of the ditch.’
    • ‘There was a field beside the road, half mucky dirt and clods, and half graying grass struggling for vitality.’
    • ‘She is fascinated, for example, by the smell of men - ‘their work clothes and tools and tobacco and mucky boots and sour-cheese socks.’’
    • ‘In mucky work boots and jeans he marched across the carpet of York model agency, sat down in front of the stunning blonde who ran the show and said defiantly: ‘I want you to turn me into a male model.’’
    • ‘The morning light was diffused to a mucky orange by the pollution of the shuddering city.’
    • ‘We crawled forward through the slimy, mucky, mass.’
    • ‘As a child, we had them for particularly rainy days walking to school when, because of their nature, we could splash in puddles with impunity and squelch our way through mucky grass verges.’
    • ‘Whether going forward or in defence these three were everywhere, covering every mucky blade of grass.’
    • ‘I stood up and kicked some dirt, it formed a mucky cloud.’
    dirty, filthy, grimy, muddy, mud-caked, grubby, messy, soiled, stained, smeared, smeary, scummy, slimy, sticky, sooty, dusty, unclean, foul, begrimed, bespattered, befouled, polluted, squalid, insanitary
    cruddy, grungy, yucky, icky, gloopy, crummy
    manky, gungy, grotty
    bogging
    scungy
    besmirched
    feculent
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal Corrupt or sordid:
      ‘a mucky mix of political wheeler-dealing and multinational corruption’
      • ‘Still, at least we can rely on Richard Curtis to sparkle fairy dust on the mucky world of politics - he's writing a screenplay about the G8 summit.’
      • ‘Daily life and work is becoming ensnared in the undercurrents of mucky politics that pervades almost every aspect of work life.’
      • ‘Through it all, there have been two constants: the Queen is pragmatic and restrained, and the media is all over every mucky story.’
      • ‘Let us escape from the mucky world of politics for a day and enjoy the cleaner healthier world of heavy engineering.’
      dirty, filthy, grimy, muddy, grubby, shabby, messy, soiled, stained, smeared, smeary, scummy, slimy, sticky, sooty, dusty, unclean, foul, squalid, flea-bitten, slummy
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British informal Mildly pornographic:
      ‘mucky books’
      • ‘Xinhua, China's official news agency, reports that one of its staffers was offered mucky clips as a purchase incentive when he asked for a demo of the video.’
      • ‘However, last week an ecclesiastical court gave the go-ahead - just as long as the masts met safety guidelines and weren't used to carry mucky material.’
      • ‘Angel told the Greenock Telegraph that she had already had some enquiries, although a number were a bit mucky.’
      • ‘A Californian pornographer is suing Google for copyright infringement alleging the search engine's image search is giving people free peeks at its mucky pictures.’
      • ‘During that time it attracted some 16,000 hits as punters paid to watch mucky movies.’
      • ‘He was accused of accessing mucky pictures and the website of a Las Vegas escort agency.’
      • ‘On Fox, which liked to test the limits of acceptability on mainstream US TV, the series was permitted to poke about in mucky areas from which other networks would have shied away.’
      • ‘He has announced that the company wants the public to send in its homemade videos - and he doesn't mind how mucky they are.’
      • ‘Can we expect any more mucky animal porn tasks in this new series?’
      • ‘On the first page of Allison's Awakening, one of the mucky books on my bedside shelf, the publishers warn that ‘this book is a work of fiction.’’
      • ‘There, 5.3 million home Net users spent more than an hour visiting hot sites, while the research found that 40 per cent of Spanish home Net users visited a mucky site in June.’

Pronunciation:

mucky

/ˈmʌki/