Definition of mucho in English:

mucho

determiner

humorous, informal
  • Much or many.

    ‘that caused me mucho problems’
    • ‘During this White Hot Winter, I'll be trying to keep warm (a hard task when you're on a swim team), watching TV, drinking mucho hot chocolate, and making the most of my senior year of high school.’
    • ‘Plus, when you ask for more than you want, you're showing that you have mucho confidence in yourself - and that means they'll have more in you, too.’
    • ‘There are still mucho things that need to be done!’
    • ‘I look like I've been involved in a drunken fracas with a broken bottle around the nose area with mucho stitching and loads of dried blood smeared around my face.’
    • ‘Rud has spent mucho time in Edmonton but now resides in Vancouver.’
    • ‘Wednesday was my Dad's birthday - his 65th - and in the evening my parents had some friends over, mucho food, etc etc.’
    • ‘I've been mucho busy with little things like taxes.’
    • ‘ABC hopes to capture the Latino market and grab mucho dinero without changing the network's news programming.’
    • ‘They are all dazzled by the prospect of mucho petro-and-gas dollars, so why not act as though we are the ‘Sheikhs of the Caribbean’, import everything we eat?’
    • ‘There's still mucho controversy about the quality of the Matrix trilogy, but very few people will argue that the original Matrix isn't a great movie.’
    • ‘This week I have off, and it's my intention to spend mucho time with D, packing, and hanging out with whomever I can while I have the time.’
    • ‘With mucho dollars attesting to their greatness, brilliant tacticians of the business world were profiled in countless splashy news reports.’
    • ‘It will take many years and cost mucho money to get them all but I can't imagine it not being more than worth it.’
    • ‘I couldn't stay all afternoon because I had mucho stuff to do, and Mark was leaving early so I asked him drop me off somewhere I could catch a bus to the skytrain.’
    • ‘Never underestimate other peoples' sensitivities and touchiness; proceed, yes - but with mucho awareness.’
    • ‘The Ontario government takes them from their parents and turns them into a freakshow roadside attraction, bringing mucho tourist dollars to northern Ontario and into government coffers but not so much into la famille Dionne.’
    • ‘She dropped me off at Jordan's, and Jordan and I went out for coffee and then spent the rest of the night talking and listening to mucho good music.’
    • ‘Tijuana, the Mexican border town south of San Diego, isn't exactly known as an incubator for culture, other than the kind of culture gringos explore after downing mucho tequila.’
    • ‘Went out last night with workmates for mucho beers…’
    • ‘Given that one of them is a VP of development at Miramax and has mucho connections in the business, it might actually happen.’

adverb

humorous, informal
  • usually as submodifier Very.

    ‘he was being mucho macho’
    • ‘If you're a fan of French cinema, you should definitely check out mucho celebrated director Patrice Leconte's latest flick.’
    • ‘On top of that Andrew played two of my all-time favourites, so it was a mucho satisfying game.’
    • ‘I can't help but think he's mucho rich or something.’
    • ‘Thanks to Big Matt for filling in, mucho appreciated!’
    • ‘Ehm… It wasn't exactly soon… and I'm mucho sorry for that!’
    • ‘He changed the boat's name from the sweet-and-saucy Bouy Toy to the mucho macho Duke-Stir in December 2004, according to Coast Guard records.’
    • ‘Larentia - Thank you mucho for the three reviews you've given me.’
    • ‘I respect them mucho and would carefully ponder what they had to say.’
    • ‘I have tried to emulate his laconic, ‘devil-may-care’ charm, and I have certainly taken on board his capacity to say a flippant remark at times when the rest of the world is in mucho serious mode.’
    • ‘West's mucho hyped debut shows he's well on the way, although he still has some work to do.’
    • ‘I found a lovely bedspread in lilac and goldstrips, but it was mucho expensive.’
    very, extremely, exceedingly, exceptionally, especially, tremendously, immensely, vastly, hugely
    View synonyms

Origin

Spanish.

Pronunciation

mucho

/ˈmʌtʃəʊ//ˈmʊtʃəʊ/