Main definitions of mound in English

: mound1mound2

mound1

noun

  • 1A rounded mass projecting above a surface.

    ‘the bushes were little more than vague mounds beneath the snow’
    • ‘Skulls, clothing and limbs still protrude from the mound of sand, more than six months after the event.’
    • ‘Through the dust we saw the bricks in a mound upon the floor.’
    • ‘To make the base sift the flour and salt into a mound on a work surface and make a well in the centre.’
    • ‘The male gathers nesting material, and the female builds a shallow mound on a shoreline.’
    • ‘Homes atop the town's hills were reduced to mounds of shingles and splintered wood.’
    • ‘In early summer, foot-long flower stalks poke above the mounds of leaves.’
    • ‘The garden seemed to be doing fine, except for a foot-high mound of chewed-up dirt on the grass near the edge of the garden.’
    • ‘He protects the eggs from the hot summer sun by adding sand or soil to the mound as a shield.’
    • ‘We lunched on chicken drumsticks, sat on a mound of sand; shielding our faces from the wind in our floppy hoods before hunting for shells and stones.’
    • ‘The male appears to select the site, and both parents build the nest, a mound of muddy tundra vegetation with a depression at the center.’
    • ‘The first signs of growth are in late winter when tight buds of foliage make a neat mound on the surface of the soil.’
    • ‘The water current moves over the sand surface building up mounds of sand.’
    • ‘The same goes for soil mounds you may have placed over your older bushes last fall.’
    • ‘The faecal casts retained their original coiled form on the sediment surface for several days but then gradually collapsed into a featureless mound on the sediment surface.’
    • ‘These easy-to-grow plants form mounds of foliage studded with flowers, sometimes so tightly packed that the leaves are barely visible.’
    • ‘Despite their pleas to both the council's environmental and waste management departments to remove the unsightly mounds the group has been told nothing can be done because the litter is on private land.’
    1. 1.1 A small hill.
      ‘he built his castle high upon the mound’
      • ‘He noticed Hunter and Brandon heading up a slight incline to the peak of a small mound, and chased after them.’
      • ‘Within minutes you will see our first objective, Wath Hill, a grassy mound with a copse.’
      • ‘Their mountain is a rather humble affair - more of a mound than a mountain.’
      • ‘On the top of the mound was a worn down cottage of a house, made of wood and braced by a large tree.’
      • ‘We went up and over a rise, and I looked out upon a plain, with three high mounds green with grass before us.’
      • ‘It bored four holes from the top of the hill to its base to allow sensitive recording equipment to be lowered inside the mound to provide a 3D image of the hill.’
      • ‘From that time until he gave up painting in the mid-1990s, the volcanic mounds of Auckland and the blue Waitemata remained a central part of his iconography.’
      • ‘Jake flipped over and spread his arms across the grassy mound he lay upon.’
      • ‘I think it all goes back to growing up in Nigeria - one day in mid summer, I climbed up a little hillock, more of a mound, I suppose, to get a better view of a coming thunderstorm.’
      • ‘Chemrey Monastery, in Ladakh, perches at 3000m on a rocky mound among the arid mountain tops of the Himalayas.’
      • ‘Goff's Caye, a dark green mangrove island a quarter-mile to our south, is only a low mound rising up from the water.’
      • ‘We got out there in a boat and discovered that the fish were congregating in an area which had a large underwater feature, a rocky mound rising up some eight feet above an otherwise featureless lake bed.’
      hillock, hill, knoll, rise, hummock, hump, embankment, bank, ridge, dune, tor, elevation, acclivity, tump
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A raised mass of earth and stones created for purposes of defence or burial.
      ‘the dead were cremated, and then buried at the centre of a great mound’
      • ‘That's why they burned down their straw shelters and left no trace of their dwellings, only their sarcophagi and burial mounds.’
      • ‘Across Britain and Ireland there are thousands of Iron Age barrows and burial mounds, and hundreds of Iron Age hill forts.’
      • ‘The tenuous suggestion that Stonehenge may thus be a sepulchral monument, is perhaps strengthened by the large number of burial mounds in the surrounding landscape.’
      • ‘These societies are well known for their funerary ceremonialism, most notably the building of burial mounds.’
      • ‘Bishops Cannings farmer Bob Frearson is in the process of putting up fences to prevent 4x4 drivers getting on to his land and using ancient burial mounds, or tumuli, as an off-road assault course.’
      • ‘Some of the many points of interest include early features such as burial mounds, stone circles and cairns that mark areas of prehistoric cultivation.’
      • ‘Groups of round burial mounds known to archaeologists as barrow cemeteries, often aligned on contours below ridges, are common in Wessex and the Thames valley.’
      • ‘When people die, they leave signs of their presence in the world, in the form of their dwelling places, burial mounds, and artefacts, in a word, their archaeology.’
      • ‘As with so many Beaker burial sites of this date, the mound was not raised to commemorate a single grave.’
      • ‘The remains of several Neolithic passage graves and over thirty Iron Age burial mounds can also be seen.’
      • ‘The raiding party had taken with them only the simplest of tools: but as they dug into the mound over the sarcophagus they were soon stopped by the heavy stonework.’
      • ‘The new circle is bigger than Seahenge and has been interpreted as the remains of a Bronze Age burial mound.’
      • ‘Bronze Age burial mounds, Iron Age settlements and the remains of Roman villages could be lost forever unless prompt action is taken to stop our furry friends from wrecking this historic area.’
      • ‘It will include visiting ancient and powerful local places: ring forts, burial mounds, and megalithic tombs in Roscommon and Sligo.’
      • ‘English Heritage is developing a management strategy to restore Bronze Age burial mounds that have been damaged by burrowing badgers and to protect those that remain untouched.’
      • ‘These are burial mounds of Bronze Age date, many from about 2000 BC to 1500 BC and they cluster in their hundreds around the Stonehenge area.’
      • ‘The tumuli, or ancient burial mounds, are obvious enough and we have always been able to work around them.’
      • ‘They knew that a wooded mound nearby hid the legendary tomb of the great emperor and so they thought this, too, was a part of it.’
      • ‘The oldest known ancient monuments at Coate are the Neolithic Stone Circle and the Bronze age burial mound along Day House Lane.’
      • ‘Before you get carried away with mirth, this is actually a serious situation: the animals are wreaking havoc on Neolithic burial mounds around the famous site.’
      • ‘Much of the frontier became ‘civilized’ at the cost of shrinking Seminole lands and desecrating Indian burial mounds.’
      • ‘These bikes uproot heather and, if they run over Iron Age ancient burial mounds, the damage would be irreversible.’
      barrow, tumulus
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3Baseball A slight elevation from which the pitcher delivers the ball.
      • ‘Connie Mack signaled his pitcher off the mound and we all looked toward the bullpen to see who was coming in.’
      • ‘And, he also can take comfort in the fact he's got a pretty smart pitcher on the mound who thrives on mental challenges.’
      • ‘The rush I get whenever I step onto the pitcher's mound is just amazing.’
      • ‘The batter hits a ball toward the mound that the pitcher deflects toward the second baseman.’
      • ‘He walked right up to me on the pitcher's mound, interrupting a baseball game I was playing with some young boys.’
      • ‘Here's a rundown of some of the most glaring failures at bat, in the field, or on the mound in a single World Series.’
  • 2a mound of/mounds ofA large pile or quantity of something.

    ‘a mound of dirty crockery’
    • ‘Massive mounds of garbage are piling up along the beaches and roadsides.’
    • ‘The volunteers piled up mounds of rubbish, including old prams, gates and fences and hoped the Council would remove it.’
    • ‘It's quite alarming to discover a mound of dirty washing strewn over your kitchen floor when you're least expecting it.’
    • ‘Plus, there's a mound of leftover gravel from our deck landscaping project.’
    • ‘At the morning meal the girls consume a slim helping of porridge before the camera moves behind the screen that separates them from the nuns to reveal the sisters tucking in to slabs of bread and jam, mountains of sausages and mounds of bacon.’
    • ‘The cops fill out a mound of paperwork and call a tow truck.’
    • ‘I was sitting in my office, surrounded by a mound of paperwork.’
    • ‘And who are the people most responsible for the mounds of garbage in town?’
    • ‘People came and went, and a mound of gifts was slowly piling higher in the halls of the castle.’
    • ‘Heavy rain had churned the camp's dirt roads to mud, but failed to drown the smell of rotting corpses that still lie beneath mounds of masonry.’
    • ‘Mike looked at the mounds of snow he and his father had shoveled.’
    • ‘He and his colleagues in the Tadcaster Fraud Squad were confronted with a mound of paperwork, huge piles of loose papers, all of which had to be read and understood.’
    • ‘There was a toppling pile of presents on the dining room table and a mound of pancakes waiting for her.’
    • ‘Various studies say that cities will have dogs so long as they continue to pile up mounds of garbage.’
    • ‘Search teams, who had shovels and a few bulldozers, were joined by survivors using their bare hands to tear at the mounds of rubble in the hope of finding anyone alive beneath the ruins.’
    • ‘In one corner, underneath a mound of empty cardboard boxes I found a large pile of the exquisite light fittings from the Chinese Room.’
    • ‘The thief smiled at the small mound of diamonds piled inside.’
    • ‘He runs down, only to discover it's a mound of garbage.’
    • ‘The mound of dirty clothing just keeps piling up until your hamper is overflowing and a sea of denim, cotton and corduroy forms a carpet on the floor of your bedroom.’
    • ‘The streets of Bam are still filled with mounds of rubble.’
    • ‘One day they came upon a mound of millet, along with stores of barley, wheat, and other seeds.’
    • ‘I heard her filling the stove with wood as I shook with cold beneath the mound of blankets.’
    • ‘I wondered if they recognized me as the one who is always putting out nuts for them on her bedroom window sill or if they were just chirping at the odd humans moving large mounds of snow?’
    • ‘Well, try painstaking research, lots of waiting around, mounds of paperwork.’
    heap, pile, stack
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Heap up into a rounded pile.

    ‘basmati rice was mounded on our plates’
    • ‘You see, to maximize the stalk size they're grown either in trenches or with soil mounded around each plant.’
    • ‘A white-jacketed waiter brought plates mounded with chicken and rice cooked over a fire.’
    • ‘The graves were so close together that people attending my relative's funeral were stumbling over the soil mounded on the grave next door.’
    • ‘See how I mounded the salad in the middle and created a border of dill with the goat cheese layered on top?’
    • ‘Another charming idea comes from the 19th Century gardens when seats were created by mounding the soil and planting chamomile thickly over the entire mound, or seat.’
    • ‘I saved the soil from the excavation and mounded it on the north side for insulation.’
    • ‘Beyond, the huge jutting tower, crumbled walls and mounded stones of the ruined castle resembled some massive mythical beast dozing at the river's edge.’
    • ‘It was a simple rectangle of crudely mounded basalt rocks, a distinctive arrangement reminiscent of the way Samoans and other Polynesians marked their dead in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.’
    • ‘With clean hands, mound the rice into a cone shape about four inches in diameter and about five inches high.’
    • ‘Make a home for insects to breed and shelter by creating a log pile of dead or rotting wood, or mound up rocks or stones in a quiet shady area of the garden.’
    • ‘This soil should be mounded up around the base of the canes to a height of 10 to 12 inches.’
    • ‘The pines are now taller and blacker and the glossy mounded foliage of native shrubs covers the banks of cuttings more densely.’
    • ‘Toss the vegetables and cilantro with the noodles, and mound the mixture on a platter.’
    • ‘She mounded the soil so the center of the bed was the highest point and firmed the soil by tamping it down with her feet to prevent it from flattening over time.’
    • ‘The traditional way to blanch asparagus is to mound mulch or sand around the spears as they emerge.’
    • ‘Cover the plastic with a thin layer of fir bark or similar mulch, taking care not to mound it around plant crowns.’
    • ‘Tip the mixture into an ovenproof dish, mounding it up in the middle.’
    • ‘Temporarily store plants in a V-shaped trench mounded with soil.’
    • ‘This is especially important when dining at restaurants that mound enough for two on a plate for one.’
    • ‘For miniature roses mounding the soil up around the rose as it remains upright may also be an option.’
    • ‘If you put the tub above ground, you can build a waterfall but you will have to mound dirt around it to help conceal it.’
    • ‘If you don't have a pastry bag, use a spoon to mound the meringue on the wax paper and make a well in the middle, creating a bowl-shaped shell.’
    pile, pile up, heap, heap up
    View synonyms
  • 2archaic Enclose or fortify with an embankment.

    ‘a sand-built ridge Of heaped hills that mound the sea’

Phrases

  • take the mound

    • (of a pitcher) have a turn at pitching.

      ‘he took the mound yesterday for the first in time in over a year’
      • ‘In one game against the St. Louis Cardinals, he took the mound in the first inning and went the rest of the way for a victory.’
      • ‘When he takes the mound, the team behind him knows they have a chance, and that's probably the biggest compliment you can give somebody.’
      • ‘On July 9, 1948, baseball's oldest rookie took the mound for the Cleveland Indians.’
      • ‘Yesterday, two Cuban pitchers took the mound in front of Major League scouts in an attempt to attract a large offer.’
      • ‘When Clemens took the mound in Game Four, he became the third oldest pitcher ever to start a World Series game.’

Origin

Early 16th century (as a verb in the sense ‘enclose with a fence or hedge’): of obscure origin. An early sense of the noun was ‘boundary hedge or fence’.

Pronunciation

mound

/maʊnd/

Main definitions of mound in English

: mound1mound2

mound2

noun

archaic
  • A ball representing the earth, used as part of royal regalia, e.g. on top of a crown, typically of gold and surmounted by a cross.

    • ‘The importance of this conclusion to Brook was that it seemed to supply evidence that there had been a mound and cross above the arches of the crown before the present ones, which he felt sure were of French workmanship and dated from the 1540 reconstruction of the crown.’
    • ‘The diamond mound is topped by a diamond ‘cross pattee’ with a sapphire in the center of the cross.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting the world): from Old French monde, from Latin mundus ‘world’.

Pronunciation

mound

/maʊnd/